Will Natural aged Cherry Veneer look the same as naturally aged solid cherry? - Woodworking Talk - Woodworkers Forum
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
post #1 of 16 Old 05-29-2010, 10:25 AM Thread Starter
Junior Member
 
Join Date: May 2010
Posts: 6
View bloodsweatandtears's Photo Album My Photos
Will Natural aged Cherry Veneer look the same as naturally aged solid cherry?

I am finishing the cherry casement window trim myself. Upstairs, instead of staining, I decided to leave the cherry trim its natural color and just apply 3 coats of minwax poly (sills will get more poly). I am using cherry veneer for the inside side pieces and the inside top peice of each window. I am concerned that perhaps the solid cherry will age differenty than the veneer pieces? (windows are 360 all around the house so some are southern exposure, some north,etc.). Anyone have any experience with how the cherry veneer ages and if it will look drastically different from the solid cherry or will everything darken and redden at about the same pace and final result?

Thanks!
bloodsweatandtears is offline  
Sponsored Links
Advertisement
 
post #2 of 16 Old 05-29-2010, 02:32 PM
Senior Member
 
phinds's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2009
Location: Central New York
Posts: 3,248
View phinds's Photo Album My Photos
I know nothing about the timing, but I have seen a lot of cherry veneer that has aged in the same way that solid cherry ages.

You can never have too much pepperoni on your pizza or own too many clamps.
www.hobbithouseinc.com/personal/woodpics/
phinds is offline  
post #3 of 16 Old 05-29-2010, 03:51 PM
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Nov 2009
Posts: 868
View Colt W. Knight's Photo Album My Photos
Cherry veneer is actually cherry, so I don't see why it wouldn't. Its thinner, so it would probaby age quicker, although the glue or paper backing might hinder it a tad.
Colt W. Knight is offline  
Sponsored Links
Advertisement
 
post #4 of 16 Old 05-29-2010, 04:11 PM
Old School
 
cabinetman's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2007
Location: So. Florida
Posts: 24,027
View cabinetman's Photo Album My Photos
With the same exposure the aging would be the same. As for color variance, two different pieces (either solid or veneer) can look different over time.






cabinetman is offline  
post #5 of 16 Old 05-29-2010, 10:26 PM
Old Methane Gas Cloud
 
Join Date: Jun 2009
Location: Huntington Beach, California
Posts: 3,500
View rrich's Photo Album My Photos
Just leave a piece of each in the sun light for a day or two. Cover half of each with something like aluminum foil. In a day you'll start to see the diference. That will give you an idea of the change that you can expect.

BTW - I think that the poly contains UV inhibitors and may slow the natural aging effect. I would use something like Minwax Antique Oil Finish.

Use the right tool for the job.

Rich (Tilting right)
Huntington Beach, California
Remember that when we have the "BIG ONE" everything east of the Rockies falls into the ocean.
rrich is offline  
post #6 of 16 Old 05-30-2010, 01:11 AM
Senior Member
 
phinds's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2009
Location: Central New York
Posts: 3,248
View phinds's Photo Album My Photos
Quote:
Originally Posted by rrich View Post
Just leave a piece of each in the sun light for a day or two. Cover half of each with something like aluminum foil. In a day you'll start to see the diference. That will give you an idea of the change that you can expect.

BTW - I think that the poly contains UV inhibitors and may slow the natural aging effect. I would use something like Minwax Antique Oil Finish.

I think only SPAR poly has UV protection, not regular poly

You can never have too much pepperoni on your pizza or own too many clamps.
www.hobbithouseinc.com/personal/woodpics/
phinds is offline  
post #7 of 16 Old 05-30-2010, 07:14 AM
Old School
 
cabinetman's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2007
Location: So. Florida
Posts: 24,027
View cabinetman's Photo Album My Photos
Quote:
Originally Posted by rrich
Just leave a piece of each in the sun light for a day or two. Cover half of each with something like aluminum foil. In a day you'll start to see the diference. That will give you an idea of the change that you can expect.

BTW - I think that the poly contains UV inhibitors and may slow the natural aging effect. I would use something like Minwax Antique Oil Finish.
Quote:
Originally Posted by phinds View Post
I think only SPAR poly has UV protection, not regular poly

That's true. Finishes intended for interior use don't usually have UV inhibitors. The Minwax Antique Oil is just an elaborate wax type product. It offers not more than a visual enhancement that would need repeated applications over time. It would do little if anything to aid or slow the aging process. The question in the OP seemed to ask if the veneer and the solid wood will appear similar, or age equally over time.

There are many conditions affecting the look and color of wood used indoors. In the same casement, there could be veneer and solid wood. For trim, there could be periods of natural light from outdoors, with long or short periods of sunlight. There could be areas where the only exposure to light would be artificial light, from incandescent, halogen, or flourescent lighting.

Two different selections of veneer (different flitches), and random solid wood selections for trim, each may take a different look. There is no control to keep one wood surface uniform to another in the same proximity.

IMO, the beauty of wood is the overall look. Trying to keep a piece of furniture with a combination of veneers and solids uniform in color seems to me to defeat the reason to use real wood and real veneer. Differences in grain and colors is the natural beauty of the material.

If the look wanted is a uniform grain and color, there are composites available with vinyl covering, Formica finishes, and photo finishes, that look like wood.






cabinetman is offline  
post #8 of 16 Old 06-06-2010, 11:12 AM Thread Starter
Junior Member
 
Join Date: May 2010
Posts: 6
View bloodsweatandtears's Photo Album My Photos
Thanks everyone, this sets my mind at ease. Appreciate all the responses!
bloodsweatandtears is offline  
post #9 of 16 Old 06-06-2010, 04:02 PM
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Mar 2010
Location: Sioux Falls, South Dakota
Posts: 282
View ash123's Photo Album My Photos
You wrote: "Will Natural aged Cherry Veneer look the same as naturally aged solid cherry?"

Mine does not.
ash123 is offline  
post #10 of 16 Old 06-07-2010, 11:28 AM Thread Starter
Junior Member
 
Join Date: May 2010
Posts: 6
View bloodsweatandtears's Photo Album My Photos
Ash123 - can you elaborate? Does yours look different because of the natural variation of the cherry grain or is it that the veneer takes on a different color type all together?

I just don't want the window to screem "you used veneer!" because of some obvious difference in how it looks from the solid peices once everything is assembled.
bloodsweatandtears is offline  
post #11 of 16 Old 06-07-2010, 10:01 PM
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Mar 2010
Location: Sioux Falls, South Dakota
Posts: 282
View ash123's Photo Album My Photos
Quote:
Originally Posted by bloodsweatandtears View Post
Ash123 - can you elaborate? Does yours look different because of the natural variation of the cherry grain or is it that the veneer takes on a different color type all together?

I just don't want the window to screem "you used veneer!" because of some obvious difference in how it looks from the solid peices once everything is assembled.
Two solid boards don't age out the same. I stain everything. I like to lay down a base of NGR. MLC has a pretty good cookbook on how to finish cherry.

I don't want to build anything memorable. If you come in my house and remember any piece I built when you're driving down the driveway back to the highway, I failed. I don't do any contrasts, no salt and pepper, no exotic veneers, no fiddleback, and no mixed woods. The reason I don't like natural is I can't control it. My home is a collection I've made over the last 30 years, all stained, and it all matches today.

I don't like cherry furniture as a product. I like the wood to work with but not the pieces. My sons like cherry. The pieces I've made for them I've laid down a NGR base, used a lacquer wiping stain over that, followed by vinyl sealer and pre-cat lacquer. For my own pieces, I stay away from shading lacquers, and glazes. Those tend to make a piece pop and that's what I'm avoiding.
ash123 is offline  
post #12 of 16 Old 06-08-2010, 08:11 AM Thread Starter
Junior Member
 
Join Date: May 2010
Posts: 6
View bloodsweatandtears's Photo Album My Photos
Ok, thanks I see what you mean. We are going with unstained cherry, left to age naturally. The cherry floor in the same room is also unstained cherry so there will be a great deal of variation accross the floor boards. But our house is a timberframe hybrid and we want to allow for the natural variations in the wood. My hesitation was that the veneer would go one way and the solid peices another (like the veneer going universally darker and showing as a distinct line within the rest of the window casing). If it is really just the natural grain variation in the veneer that will show up just like that from the solid booards, I'm ok with that.
bloodsweatandtears is offline  
post #13 of 16 Old 10-20-2014, 06:19 PM
Junior Member
 
mroughan's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2014
Location: hopkinton ma.
Posts: 6
View mroughan's Photo Album My Photos
I have cherry heartwood, veneer and sapwood. Unlike ASH123, I used the sapwood to accent several symmetrical pieces. I am assuming the sapwood does not darken with time as the heartwood does. Is that true?

I used a natural Danish oil finish.
mroughan is offline  
post #14 of 16 Old 10-20-2014, 07:45 PM
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Sep 2011
Posts: 25,995
View Steve Neul's Photo Album My Photos
The sapwood will darken too however it will have more of a yellow appearance to it. If you need to you can color the sapwood with dyes so it nearly matches the heartwood. The dye is similar to ink so you could use Danish oil over the top.
Steve Neul is offline  
post #15 of 16 Old 10-20-2014, 10:38 PM
Senior Member
 
RandyReed's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2014
Posts: 1,311
View RandyReed's Photo Album My Photos
"Cherry sap stain"
RandyReed is offline  
post #16 of 16 Old 10-21-2014, 03:18 PM
Junior Member
 
mroughan's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2014
Location: hopkinton ma.
Posts: 6
View mroughan's Photo Album My Photos
Thanks for the feedback. I want to keep the variation but relieved to hear that both the heartwood and sapwood will darken. Since I've oiled it already, I'll probably let it go for a couple of years and then if the contrast is too dramatic go to the "sap stain" approach.
mroughan is offline  
Reply

Quick Reply
Message:
Options

Register Now



In order to be able to post messages on the Woodworking Talk - Woodworkers Forum forums, you must first register.
Please enter your desired user name, your email address and other required details in the form below.

User Name:
Password
Please enter a password for your user account. Note that passwords are case-sensitive.

Password:


Confirm Password:
Email Address
Please enter a valid email address for yourself.

Email Address:
OR

Log-in










Thread Tools
Show Printable Version Show Printable Version
Email this Page Email this Page
Display Modes
Linear Mode Linear Mode



Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Aged Walnut joetonka515 General Woodworking Discussion 6 12-29-2013 07:19 PM
Solid Cherry Door, with a Bronze Relief twoartistic Project Showcase 3 02-15-2010 10:22 AM
aged look for new oak donxoh Wood Finishing 8 02-03-2010 03:30 PM
removing the aged look of pine plywood beerdog Wood Finishing 3 01-23-2010 09:36 PM
Aged/seasoned (old) lumber Daren Forestry & Milling 17 09-20-2008 05:29 PM

Posting Rules  
You may post new threads
You may post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off

 
For the best viewing experience please update your browser to Google Chrome