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post #1 of 10 Old 05-05-2012, 12:10 PM Thread Starter
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What grit?

Getting ready to do the final sanding post stain on my bookcase. Mom always used 00 steel wool so thats what I bought. However, on these large surfaces its kind of a pain as it wants to ball up etc. I would rather use sandpaper. I have scoured the net to no avail to find the equivalent grit sandpaper to 00 steel wool. Anyone know? Or better yet, what grit sandpaper do you use post stain? Thank you in advance. I did search the forum before posting as well but I cannot find a related link.
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post #2 of 10 Old 05-05-2012, 02:46 PM
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I never use steel wool until after the final coat of finish. Then, it's Liberon 400. And then only to take away some of the gloss.
What species of wood are you using? What was your final sanding grit BEFORE staining? Was your stain water based or oil. If oil, has it cured sufficiently?
Depending on the wood species, it should have been sanded to at least 180 before staining. Any higher grit will affect the way the stain soaks in.
If you used water based stain, the grain will have raised and you'll need to knock down the nibs with a light sanding with 220...assuming you went to at least 180 prior to staining.
A light touch is needed in order not to sand through the stain. Use a soft foam pad and wrap the 220 around it. Be extra careful on the corners and edges.

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post #3 of 10 Old 05-05-2012, 02:51 PM
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It would help if we knew what kind of wood you are sanding and what color and type of finish you are going to finish with. If you are going to finish with a light color and use an oil finish you would sand the wood much finer than if you were going to go dark with a chemical coating.
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post #4 of 10 Old 05-05-2012, 03:07 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Gene Howe View Post
I never use steel wool until after the final coat of finish. Then, it's Liberon 400. And then only to take away some of the gloss.
What species of wood are you using? What was your final sanding grit BEFORE staining? Was your stain water based or oil. If oil, has it cured sufficiently?
Depending on the wood species, it should have been sanded to at least 180 before staining. Any higher grit will affect the way the stain soaks in.
If you used water based stain, the grain will have raised and you'll need to knock down the nibs with a light sanding with 220...assuming you went to at least 180 prior to staining.
A light touch is needed in order not to sand through the stain. Use a soft foam pad and wrap the 220 around it. Be extra careful on the corners and edges.
+1.




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post #5 of 10 Old 05-05-2012, 08:07 PM Thread Starter
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Sorry guys, It is a pine bookcase(I'm still new and making mistakes so pine is best for me for now) and I sanded it to 220. Wet everything, sanded 220 again then stained a dark chesnut oil based. Its been sitting for about five days now so I would think its cured. I plan on putting gloss poly. I was going to do a light sanding before poly though.
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post #6 of 10 Old 05-05-2012, 08:27 PM
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You don't want to do any sanding after the stain is on or you will just remove it. Don't use steel wool on raw or stained wood. Small shards of the wool will embed in the surface and you will be depositing the oil that is present in the wool on your surface, which can cause adhesion problems for your top coat. Steel wool is often used after a top coat but not before. Do all your sanding before staining and don't do any more until you have a couple of coats of finish on, otherwise, you will rub through both top coat and stain.
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post #7 of 10 Old 05-05-2012, 08:34 PM
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I agree with sanding prior to staining, and not sanding the stain. Instead of steel wool, there are other "wools", like bronze, and synthetic wools. ScotchBrite pads make good abrasion mediums.





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post #8 of 10 Old 05-05-2012, 09:35 PM
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>>>> Wet everything, sanded 220 again

There is no need to pre-raise the grain prior to using a oil based stain. Raising the grain is only used when you plan to use a waterbased stain.

Howie..........
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post #9 of 10 Old 05-05-2012, 09:37 PM
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Here is a chart of grit equivilents for sandpaper, steel wool and non-woven abrasive material (Scotchbrite)

http://academic.evergreen.edu/projec...ric/finish.pdf

Howie..........
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post #10 of 10 Old 05-06-2012, 11:08 PM Thread Starter
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Thanks howard, thats perfect.
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