Trouble Stripping a Mahogany Table - Woodworking Talk - Woodworkers Forum
 
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post #1 of 9 Old 11-26-2017, 10:50 AM Thread Starter
GAF
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Trouble Stripping a Mahogany Table

I am using Clean Strip STRIP-X Stripper on a small mahogany table. After more than 30 minutes the stripper has hardly moved the top coat as you can see from the picture provided. On the flat surfaces I am also able to scrap off some of the finish with a razor blade scrapper. On the curved surfaces I am not sure what I will be able to do.

The top coat is high gloss and looks very thick. Is it possible that this is a pour on epoxy coating?

Any suggestions on how to proceed would be appreciated.

Thank you.

Gary
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post #2 of 9 Old 11-26-2017, 11:17 AM
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Stripping furniture isn't a winter sport. Even professional removers don't do well at all below 70 degrees. I shut down the refinishing part of my business on Oct 1 and I'm in Texas.

Somehow you would have to heat your shop very hot getting the table and chemicals to summerlike conditions and then shut the heat off to strip the table. The real problem is you would need an air supplied respirator to be able to stay in there with it.
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post #3 of 9 Old 11-26-2017, 12:27 PM Thread Starter
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Originally Posted by Steve Neul View Post
Stripping furniture isn't a winter sport. Even professional removers don't do well at all below 70 degrees. I shut down the refinishing part of my business on Oct 1 and I'm in Texas.

Somehow you would have to heat your shop very hot getting the table and chemicals to summerlike conditions and then shut the heat off to strip the table. The real problem is you would need an air supplied respirator to be able to stay in there with it.
Steve, I do the stripping indoors in my workshop which I know is not a great idea but as a hobbyist I don't do a ton of it. The workshop is above 70 at all times.

So I am not sure what my next move is.

Gary
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post #4 of 9 Old 11-26-2017, 12:37 PM
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It looks too thin to be an epoxy finish. It maybe is conversion varnish I don't know. If you can rig up a double boiler you might try heating the remover up to about 120 degrees and try it. If that doesn't work you might try strypeeze remover. Usually what one remover doesn't work the other will.

You're going to end up giving yourself cancer stripping furniture enclosed inside with the fumes. I know they are really expensive but you need to find an air supplied respirator. It has an air compressor rated for breathable air you put someplace where the air is clean and it pumps a continuous supply of clean air to the mask.
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post #5 of 9 Old 11-26-2017, 01:00 PM
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Apply the stripper and cover it with plastic and let it sit. Sometimes 30 minutes isn't enough. We'll heavy coat table tops at the end of the day, wrap them up in plastic, and then get after it the next morning. Usually the next day we'll brush on a light coat and then it scrapes right off.
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post #6 of 9 Old 11-26-2017, 01:19 PM Thread Starter
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Steve Neul View Post
It looks too thin to be an epoxy finish. It maybe is conversion varnish I don't know. If you can rig up a double boiler you might try heating the remover up to about 120 degrees and try it. If that doesn't work you might try strypeeze remover. Usually what one remover doesn't work the other will.

You're going to end up giving yourself cancer stripping furniture enclosed inside with the fumes. I know they are really expensive but you need to find an air supplied respirator. It has an air compressor rated for breathable air you put someplace where the air is clean and it pumps a continuous supply of clean air to the mask.
Steve nice ideas about the stripping.

I appreciate the heads up about the fumes. What shocks me is that strippers could be sold that are carcinogenic like that. With all the tough environmental and health regulations how can this stuff be sold. I guess I better do more research to see if things are different in Canada.

Gary
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post #7 of 9 Old 11-26-2017, 01:46 PM
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Steve nice ideas about the stripping.

I appreciate the heads up about the fumes. What shocks me is that strippers could be sold that are carcinogenic like that. With all the tough environmental and health regulations how can this stuff be sold. I guess I better do more research to see if things are different in Canada.

Gary
You probably have to live in California to run into that roadblock.

When I started buying remover in 55 gallon drums from Kwick Kleen a representative from the company came out to my shop to kinda instructed me on the safe handling of it. At the time I was wearing a common paint spray respirator when stripping furniture and he told me I would be better off not using the respirator because the respirator would capture and hold the methylene chloride and any time I wore the respirator I would be exposing myself to it. He had me move the strip tank next to the back door where most days the natural air flow through the building would pull the chemical fumes out. That was ages before I ever heard of a air supplied respirator. I didn't find out about that until I started using automotive urethane paint which had isocyanate hardeners in it which is really terrible stuff. I cheaped out and painted a tractor onetime with it using a cartridge respirator outdoors and held my breath when downwind from the paint. After just using a couple gallons of that paint I coughed for six months. I never even smelled the paint and it got me.
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post #8 of 9 Old 11-26-2017, 04:03 PM Thread Starter
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Originally Posted by J_L View Post
Apply the stripper and cover it with plastic and let it sit. Sometimes 30 minutes isn't enough. We'll heavy coat table tops at the end of the day, wrap them up in plastic, and then get after it the next morning. Usually the next day we'll brush on a light coat and then it scrapes right off.
Thanks.

I am having laptop issues because I already commented on your idea but I don't see my reply.

I will give this a try overnight tonight.

Gary
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post #9 of 9 Old 11-26-2017, 04:05 PM Thread Starter
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Steve Neul View Post
You probably have to live in California to run into that roadblock.

When I started buying remover in 55 gallon drums from Kwick Kleen a representative from the company came out to my shop to kinda instructed me on the safe handling of it. At the time I was wearing a common paint spray respirator when stripping furniture and he told me I would be better off not using the respirator because the respirator would capture and hold the methylene chloride and any time I wore the respirator I would be exposing myself to it. He had me move the strip tank next to the back door where most days the natural air flow through the building would pull the chemical fumes out. That was ages before I ever heard of a air supplied respirator. I didn't find out about that until I started using automotive urethane paint which had isocyanate hardeners in it which is really terrible stuff. I cheaped out and painted a tractor onetime with it using a cartridge respirator outdoors and held my breath when downwind from the paint. After just using a couple gallons of that paint I coughed for six months. I never even smelled the paint and it got me.
Steve, this is a scary story. I will surely start doing less or none of this indoors. That is tough with the few months of winter that we get here.

Gary
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