Teak oil not dry after a month - Woodworking Talk - Woodworkers Forum
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post #1 of 12 Old 05-26-2020, 01:40 PM Thread Starter
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Question Teak oil not dry after a month

I have a 3 in thick slab of black walnut made into a coffee table that over the course of a week and dozens of coats soaked up two quarts worth of Watco Teak oil into the grain before showing a sheen on the surface. I left it to dry for month (indoors @ 70'F) before returning to sand it. The coat was still a little bit sticky so i applied mineral spirits and sanded it down a few times expecting it to dry. The surface is still ever so slightly tacky after another day. Is there a solution to get this Teak oil to fully dry out if a month didn't do the trick?

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post #2 of 12 Old 05-26-2020, 01:46 PM
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welcome to the forum:

Quote:
Originally Posted by stevet View Post
over the course of a week and dozens of coats soaked up two quarts worth of Teak oil into the grain before showing a sheen on the surface.
not knowing what brand or type of teak oil you used, what do the directions
say on the can for application instructions ??

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post #3 of 12 Old 05-26-2020, 05:59 PM Thread Starter
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The Watco Teak oil says to flood the surface, let it sit for 30 minutes, then wipe it dry. Reapply and soak for another 15 minutes and wipe it dry. Ready to use in 8 - 10 hours.
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post #4 of 12 Old 05-26-2020, 06:29 PM
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I thought someone would answer you before now.
Quote:
The Watco Teak oil says to flood the surface, let it sit for 30 minutes, then wipe it dry.
Reapply and soak for another 15 minutes and wipe it dry.
Ready to use in 8 - 10 hours.
that is only two coats:

I should also have asked; how old is the wood slab and how long
has it been processed into a slab. (is the moisture content known).

here is my concern:
over the course of a week, you applied dozens of coats which soaked up two quarts
worth of Watco Teak oil. the instructions state 2-3 coats "should be" sufficient.
if the wood is in extreme distress, 4-6 coats may be required, 12 hours apart.
in my uneducated guess, you have flooded the wood to the point that the inside
will not dry or cure. it is sort of like you have created a skin in a paint can.
the floating skin appears to be solid. but underneath, it is still liquid.

if you google: "teak oil won't dry" you will find all kinds documentations of the
same issue. and most are different with the type of wood they used.

not to drag this out, but, I think you applied way too many coats in too short
of a time period. continually wiping the surface with a solvent such as mineral spirits,
naphtha or xylene "could" remove the surface oil and let more fresh oil rise to the
surface. but, I have no idea how long it would take before it is "dry to the touch".
I would suggest you call the Watco help line listed on the can for assistance
right from the source. and explain in detail, the type of wood, moisture content,
the climatic conditions of when you applied it.
years ago, I had a very similar issue with varnish. I called the help desk.
the technician said I had "vehicle entrapment". which is what I explained up top.
the skin dries, trapping the fluid inside the wood. I used some pretty extreme
measures with hot solvents to get the project back on track.
maybe one of the Chemical Engineers will be along soon to provide more
possibilities of how to correct your issues.

.

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Last edited by John Smith_inFL; 05-26-2020 at 06:34 PM.
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post #5 of 12 Old 05-26-2020, 08:29 PM Thread Starter
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I've sanded it down to 80 grit and back up to 320, with two washes of mineral spirits between each grit. It appears to by drying out as the sticky has bonded onto the discs I've discarded. I'll continue to wash it with mineral spirits. Is there something that might be stronger than MS?
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post #6 of 12 Old 05-26-2020, 08:39 PM
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acetone & lacquer thinner is much stronger than mineral spirits.
MUST BE USED OUTSIDE with adequate ventilation.
read the dangers of spontaneous combustion of rags, paint,
oils, thinners and cleaners and follow the warnings carefully.

looking forward to seeing your completed project.

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post #7 of 12 Old 05-26-2020, 11:51 PM
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Here he was talking about un-boiled linseed oil.

"Apply once a day for a week, once a week for a month, once a month for a year, and once a year for the rest of your life! Following this method (which canít be rushed) it takes about 6 months to get a piece looking good."

George Utley


I've never been a fan of Tung or Watco for exactly the problems that you are experiencing. I think that the problem is that the thinners or flash off components tend to change or seep out as the product ages.

My advice is to remove as much as you can with naphtha. And then try a fresh can of Watco or Tung. Or my favorite, MinWax Antique Oil Finish. Generally I'll apply two or three coats of MAOF with a day or two between coats. Then allow the piece to out-gas in an area that won't offend the boss of the house. When the out-gas process is done, wax with a good paste wax. You don't say where you are, geographically, but from Southern California you may have to take you piece to Nevada or Arizona to finish it.

Rich
In furniture 1/32" is a Grand Canyon
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post #8 of 12 Old 05-27-2020, 02:30 AM
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How big is the slab and is it end grain on the surface?
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post #9 of 12 Old 05-27-2020, 09:41 AM Thread Starter
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The slab is 2' x 5' x 3", live edges and face grain.

After bringing the piece up to 1000 grit with a dozen mineral spirit washes and two very thin applications with Watco Teak I've noticed an uneven sheen that has occurred on the walnut, which I noticed on previous applications. The majority of it is matte but on a few lines along the grain and on a knot it is shiny, which was not the case back down at 240, I presume it is the residual Watco Teak.
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post #10 of 12 Old 05-27-2020, 05:40 PM Thread Starter
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I have stripped the remaining finish off effectively. In the future I will use a pore filler for the live edges of wood as they continue to seep small amounts of soaked teak oil after stripping. I will be refinishing with Tung oil finish after the piece dries.
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post #11 of 12 Old 05-27-2020, 05:44 PM
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Steve - what is the history of the wood ?
when was the tree cut down, how old is the slab, how was it dried.
when was it dried, for how long did it dry, yada yada yada.
this info could also play a part in your issues.

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post #12 of 12 Old 05-28-2020, 02:41 AM Thread Starter
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Slab was cut 10 years ago, sat in the mill for 2 years outdoors in CA, kiln dried for 1 month, finished, furniture stored indoors for 3 years, resurfaced for edge warping, stored indoor two more years, moisture content of <1%.
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