Staining Color Error - Woodworking Talk - Woodworkers Forum
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
post #1 of 12 Old 10-13-2014, 02:06 PM Thread Starter
Member
 
Join Date: Jan 2013
Posts: 88
View JoeMemphis's Photo Album My Photos
Staining Color Error

Ok, I spent a day trying to regain my composure after realizing I stained my end tables the wrong color to match the coffee table I made last year...

I actually even made a sample to check and it seemed off but I referred back to my notes and went with what I wrote...well my notes were wrong....

Anyways how much of a problem is it to strip and restain something? Note: I put a coat of polyurethane on as well (I'm not winning) Any instruction on how to go about fixing my bone head mistake would be greatly appreciated...

Thanks,
The color blind woodworker...
JoeMemphis is offline  
Sponsored Links
Advertisement
 
post #2 of 12 Old 10-13-2014, 03:13 PM
Senior Member
 
RandyReed's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2014
Posts: 1,311
View RandyReed's Photo Album My Photos
Quote:
Originally Posted by JoeMemphis View Post
Ok, I spent a day trying to regain my composure after realizing I stained my end tables the wrong color to match the coffee table I made last year...

I actually even made a sample to check and it seemed off but I referred back to my notes and went with what I wrote...well my notes were wrong....

Anyways how much of a problem is it to strip and restain something? Note: I put a coat of polyurethane on as well (I'm not winning) Any instruction on how to go about fixing my bone head mistake would be greatly appreciated...

Thanks,
The color blind woodworker...
You might can simply sand it down with 180 grit to the bare wood. If not, you will have to strip it, then sand it down with 180 grit and start over.
RandyReed is offline  
post #3 of 12 Old 10-13-2014, 03:26 PM
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Sep 2011
Posts: 25,995
View Steve Neul's Photo Album My Photos
The color difference, is it too light or too dark or wrong tone? If it is too light or the wrong tone you can tone over what you have done with just one coat of poly. If it's too dark and the poly hasn't dried too long you might be able to wash it off with lacquer thinner. It is more or less stripping it but less messy than paint stripper. If the lacquer thinner won't cut it then you might have to resort to stripper and start over.

If the color is too light or the wrong tone could you post pictures of what the piece looks like and what it needs to be.
Steve Neul is offline  
Sponsored Links
Advertisement
 
post #4 of 12 Old 10-13-2014, 03:27 PM Thread Starter
Member
 
Join Date: Jan 2013
Posts: 88
View JoeMemphis's Photo Album My Photos
Would I strip it because there's oil based poly on it? What do I use too strip it? Am I going to have to sand a lot of wood for two coats of stain? I have to take into account the center has a glass insert even with the table surface. Would it be easier to start over with the table build?

Name:  ForumRunner_20141013_142709.jpg
Views: 87
Size:  64.5 KB
JoeMemphis is offline  
post #5 of 12 Old 10-13-2014, 03:34 PM Thread Starter
Member
 
Join Date: Jan 2013
Posts: 88
View JoeMemphis's Photo Album My Photos
I stained it golden pecan when it should of been ipswich pine...it's redder and lighter vs should of been browner and a little darker...
JoeMemphis is offline  
post #6 of 12 Old 10-13-2014, 03:42 PM
Senior Member
 
RandyReed's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2014
Posts: 1,311
View RandyReed's Photo Album My Photos
Quote:
Originally Posted by JoeMemphis View Post
I stained it golden pecan when it should of been ipswich pine...it's redder and lighter vs should of been browner and a little darker...
You can apply a green "shade" dye stain (equalizer) to kill the red which in turn will make it slightly darker and move the color to the brown side. Ease up on it! If you start to get too much on the green side, you can take steel wool and highlite it back off.

Last edited by RandyReed; 10-13-2014 at 03:45 PM.
RandyReed is offline  
post #7 of 12 Old 10-13-2014, 03:46 PM
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Sep 2011
Posts: 25,995
View Steve Neul's Photo Album My Photos
Quote:
Originally Posted by JoeMemphis View Post
Would I strip it because there's oil based poly on it? What do I use too strip it? Am I going to have to sand a lot of wood for two coats of stain? I have to take into account the center has a glass insert even with the table surface. Would it be easier to start over with the table build?

Attachment 100267
H no. Getting it the wrong color doesn't merit rebuilding the table. If the finish needs to come off work use Kleen Strip paint and varnish remover however no remover including professional removers work well below 70 degrees so that may be an issue this time of year. If you have the glass glued in the remover may affect the glue but won't hurt the glass. Brush a liberal amount of remover on the table and touch what spots that dry for about 15 minutes and then scrape the poly off with a broad knife. Then as quick as you can wash the residue off with lacquer thinner. What I use to rinse the residue off with is a power washer that is less than 1500 psi. It will clean the wood better than lacquer thinner. It's important to get the residue off because removers contain wax to help keep them from evaporating. This wax will interfere with the adhesion of the new finish. Once the table is stripped and dries it can be sanded and finished as it was the first time.

Randy is right, a green dye will neutralize the red color. Use it sparingly. It's better to put multiple coats of green on then get too much.

Last edited by Steve Neul; 10-13-2014 at 03:48 PM.
Steve Neul is offline  
post #8 of 12 Old 10-13-2014, 03:58 PM
Senior Member
 
RandyReed's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2014
Posts: 1,311
View RandyReed's Photo Album My Photos
Quote:
Originally Posted by Steve Neul View Post
H no.
Couldnt have said that better myself. LOL
RandyReed is offline  
post #9 of 12 Old 10-13-2014, 04:58 PM Thread Starter
Member
 
Join Date: Jan 2013
Posts: 88
View JoeMemphis's Photo Album My Photos
So it's basically like restaining a fence. The glass is removable, so that's not a problem. The wood is a soft pine, I think the pressure washer would damage it though....I'm not really comfortable adding green dye...
JoeMemphis is offline  
post #10 of 12 Old 10-13-2014, 05:00 PM Thread Starter
Member
 
Join Date: Jan 2013
Posts: 88
View JoeMemphis's Photo Album My Photos
Quote:
Originally Posted by Steve Neul View Post
H no. Getting it the wrong color doesn't merit rebuilding the table. If the finish needs to come off work use Kleen Strip paint and varnish remover however no remover including professional removers work well below 70 degrees so that may be an issue this time of year. If you have the glass glued in the remover may affect the glue but won't hurt the glass. Brush a liberal amount of remover on the table and touch what spots that dry for about 15 minutes and then scrape the poly off with a broad knife. Then as quick as you can wash the residue off with lacquer thinner. What I use to rinse the residue off with is a power washer that is less than 1500 psi. It will clean the wood better than lacquer thinner. It's important to get the residue off because removers contain wax to help keep them from evaporating. This wax will interfere with the adhesion of the new finish. Once the table is stripped and dries it can be sanded and finished as it was the first time.

Randy is right, a green dye will neutralize the red color. Use it sparingly. It's better to put multiple coats of green on then get too much.
So I'm looking at probably doing this next summer because it's in the 50's now...
JoeMemphis is offline  
post #11 of 12 Old 10-13-2014, 08:25 PM
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Sep 2011
Posts: 25,995
View Steve Neul's Photo Album My Photos
Quote:
Originally Posted by JoeMemphis View Post
So I'm looking at probably doing this next summer because it's in the 50's now...
If you have the means of spraying I think the table could easily be fixed. With only one coat of poly on it you could spray it with a alcohol based green dye right over the coat of poly. The dye then dries in a few minutes and could be coated over with another coat of poly. The dye is very similar to ink and is very transparent so nobody would know. The green dye is thinned to where it looks more like a watered down lime koolaid. It doesn't take very much to make wood that is too red more brown. You can also put multiple coats on if you have it mixed too thin. In fact that would be better to ease up on the color rather than get too much.

If you have to strip it maybe you will have a warm day before winter. It's cool here in Texas too but that could change next week. Personally I've been making it a point to strip everything I need done as I will soon quit for the year. I've already stopped accepting refinishing work from customers for the season. Time is definitely running out. Just don't attempt to strip the table inside. The chemicals in removers are a carcinogen and you need a lot of ventilation.
Steve Neul is offline  
post #12 of 12 Old 10-13-2014, 09:00 PM
Senior Member
 
RandyReed's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2014
Posts: 1,311
View RandyReed's Photo Album My Photos
Applying a green dye stain is alot easier than stripping it......
RandyReed is offline  
Reply

Quick Reply
Message:
Options

Register Now



In order to be able to post messages on the Woodworking Talk - Woodworkers Forum forums, you must first register.
Please enter your desired user name, your email address and other required details in the form below.

User Name:
Password
Please enter a password for your user account. Note that passwords are case-sensitive.

Password:


Confirm Password:
Email Address
Please enter a valid email address for yourself.

Email Address:
OR

Log-in










Thread Tools
Show Printable Version Show Printable Version
Email this Page Email this Page
Display Modes
Linear Mode Linear Mode



Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
bleaching/staining for color matching tns1 Wood Finishing 15 02-03-2014 11:49 AM
100 grit before staining for dark color? stargazer424 Wood Finishing 6 03-04-2013 12:28 AM
Staining maple an espresso color pwalter5110 Wood Finishing 7 12-18-2012 06:22 AM
Staining wood a dark color Vickersj24 General Woodworking Discussion 7 01-02-2012 08:18 PM
Post-Staining Color Mismatch of Solid Oak and Oak Plywood doesgo Wood Finishing 3 12-31-2008 10:21 AM

Posting Rules  
You may post new threads
You may post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off

 
For the best viewing experience please update your browser to Google Chrome