Silicon paint on wood? - Woodworking Talk - Woodworkers Forum
 
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post #1 of 10 Old 04-30-2012, 11:26 AM Thread Starter
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Silicon paint on wood?

I need an advice about silicon paints . Its like silicon ,just that it is made as paint and i have never used it on wood surfaces .
Will it hold strong ? I am not searching for beauty now ,but just for the strongest sealing and lasting coating . I have made some experiments by painting a tiny wooden square with it and submerging it in water for a week . It seems to hold strong there ,but silicon is soft and i don't know how it will hold on to outside weather .
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post #2 of 10 Old 04-30-2012, 12:46 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by V.Dichev View Post
I need an advice about silicon paints . Its like silicon ,just that it is made as paint and i have never used it on wood surfaces .
Will it hold strong ? I am not searching for beauty now ,but just for the strongest sealing and lasting coating . I have made some experiments by painting a tiny wooden square with it and submerging it in water for a week . It seems to hold strong there ,but silicon is soft and i don't know how it will hold on to outside weather .
Hi V, if it is made and formulated for wood, though i have not personally seen any that are, then my best advice would be to contact the manufacturer as to it's suitability for your particular needs.

We can discuss it here of course, but without knowing the whole picture as to what other resins/compounds/additives/etc., may be involved, as to provide excellent exterior application life, it would be at most speculative.

You can if you want, tell us the brand name and what info is on the can, but that would still be little to go on as to giving recommendation of it being suitable for your needs. Even a MSDS would only give evidence to the solvents or diluents etc., without any further resin solids info. And a PI sheet only application parameters and maybe a little more.

I'll leave it up to you to decide what is the best way to go, but my suggestion of contacting the manufacturer in in my opinion the best option.

Of course, if it states on the can that is meant for a certain or specific end use such as metal etc., then there is of course a very high chance it would not give optimal results on wood.

Sincerely,

CHEMMY


Last edited by chemmy; 04-30-2012 at 12:48 PM.
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post #3 of 10 Old 04-30-2012, 01:33 PM Thread Starter
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This silicon paint is actually made for rocks ,but since rocks can be both porous and non porous ( that don't soak up water as much ) ,this means that the sealant should be sticky and penetrative . Maybe this is why they used silicon . An optimum quality of silicon is its weather and temperature stability .
Wood is a porous material . It sticks well to it and this is why i would like to try it out .The conditions at which the wood is subjected now are : Sun all day long ,moisture and every wood destroying agent imaginable .There is no friction ,so i don't need hard coatings .
The other alternatives crack due to the Sun's UV rays . Water borne acrylics and polyurethanes are good and i am thinking about them as well but the poly is too hard and i need flexible coating ,yet the acrylics are not as strong as the poly . This is why i started going toward the silicon paint .
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post #4 of 10 Old 04-30-2012, 01:40 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by V.Dichev View Post
This silicon paint is actually made for rocks ,but since rocks can be both porous and non porous ( that don't soak up water as much ) ,this means that the sealant should be sticky and penetrative .
What brand name is it? What else does it say on the label?




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post #5 of 10 Old 04-30-2012, 02:07 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by V.Dichev View Post
This silicon paint is actually made for rocks ,but since rocks can be both porous and non porous ( that don't soak up water as much ) ,this means that the sealant should be sticky and penetrative . Maybe this is why they used silicon . An optimum quality of silicon is its weather and temperature stability .
Wood is a porous material . It sticks well to it and this is why i would like to try it out .The conditions at which the wood is subjected now are : Sun all day long ,moisture and every wood destroying agent imaginable .There is no friction ,so i don't need hard coatings .
The other alternatives crack due to the Sun's UV rays . Water borne acrylics and polyurethanes are good and i am thinking about them as well but the poly is too hard and i need flexible coating ,yet the acrylics are not as strong as the poly . This is why i started going toward the silicon paint .
Thank you for the insight, With what your stating, i would at least then run some samples and test it this way, first heating it in the oven [once fully cured] to around 180 degrees for an hour, and then allowing it to reach room temp, and putting in the freezer 4 hours or until it reaches freezer temp. , 10 cycles will let you know if there will be any problems as to adhesion factors - though I'm sure this was done on stone by the mfg., if that is it's intended use, probably the case for wood was not evaluated.

Again without knowing if it is a pure [100%] silicone product, i can not say anything for sure, but other things you can test fr is permeability by doing as you have done so far but boiling the water with the cubes in it and seeing if any permeation or gain of moisture through capillary action takes place. Instead of using small cubes though you should at least use a board as wide and thick as to what your intending to actually coat ok?

Still think the best advice is to contact the company though, they would no better than anyone else unless by some chance somebody here has done such long ago and can say that the exact product your using works great, ok?

Sincerely,

CHEMMY

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post #6 of 10 Old 04-30-2012, 03:17 PM Thread Starter
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Its a native factory so brand name doesn't mater . You won't find it where you live .
It says do :
Very high atmospheric resistance ,preserving the polish and elasticity in big temperature differences .
Excellent adhesion to the base .
Coverings are resistant to washing and friction .
Ecologically compliant product . No smell . Wash brushes with water .

Interestingly it really doesn't smell .

I will do the tests mentioned tomorrow .
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post #7 of 10 Old 04-30-2012, 04:00 PM
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Its a native factory so brand name doesn't mater . You won't find it where you live .
You asked a question about a product, but wont tell what the name of it is. It's not a matter of whether we will go to a store to find it. There are many very experienced individuals on this forum that live in different cities in many different countries.

With a product name, someone may be familiar with it. That would be a start with eliminating guesswork and narrowing down the type of tests to make a determination if it would be an appropriate product for you to use.






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post #8 of 10 Old 04-30-2012, 04:37 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by V.Dichev View Post
Its a native factory so brand name doesn't mater . You won't find it where you live .
It says do :
Very high atmospheric resistance ,preserving the polish and elasticity in big temperature differences .
Excellent adhesion to the base .
Coverings are resistant to washing and friction .
Ecologically compliant product . No smell . Wash brushes with water .

Interestingly it really doesn't smell .

I will do the tests mentioned tomorrow .
Still think the best advice is to contact the company and put your questions to them, If they in-turn can not answer you, then you can test if you like or come back with more in-depth info if it's not something your trying to keep to yourself OK?

Sincerely,

CHEMMY

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post #9 of 10 Old 05-01-2012, 02:42 PM
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I think Chemmy is right. Call the manufacturer. I know that if you had product from our company it would be a really bad idea to come to a public forum to get advice.

'Silicone Paint' is a very BIG word. In other words, it can mean a lot of things. Silicone will react readily with a TON of different things. So, I can make thousands of different kinds of silicone paint from Silicone Epoxy, Silicone Polyester, Silicone Acrylic, Silicone Alkyd, pure silicone, etc... the list could just go on and on... and on... Maybe it's a simple silicone resin emulsion... I noticed the water cleanup... but... no one here has enough information to help you.

Last, not all 'silicone paints' have the same properties. Don't assume this paint will do something that you saw another silicone paint do. Call the manufacturer!
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post #10 of 10 Old 05-01-2012, 03:35 PM
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Originally Posted by WolverineE View Post
I think Chemmy is right. Call the manufacturer. I know that if you had product from our company it would be a really bad idea to come to a public forum to get advice.

'Silicone Paint' is a very BIG word. In other words, it can mean a lot of things. Silicone will react readily with a TON of different things. So, I can make thousands of different kinds of silicone paint from Silicone Epoxy, Silicone Polyester, Silicone Acrylic, Silicone Alkyd, pure silicone, etc... the list could just go on and on... and on... Maybe it's a simple silicone resin emulsion... I noticed the water cleanup... but... no one here has enough information to help you.

Last, not all 'silicone paints' have the same properties. Don't assume this paint will do something that you saw another silicone paint do. Call the manufacturer!
My point exactly W, thanks for the input!

Sincerely,

CHEMMY

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