sanded too fine before staining - Woodworking Talk - Woodworkers Forum
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post #1 of 10 Old 02-12-2020, 09:51 AM Thread Starter
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Question sanded too fine before staining

I am staining a pine tv stand with an oil based stain. My first attempt I ended up with some blotching and black areas so I started over and did 2 coats of prestain conditioner. I wasn't totally happy with the results but it was better. I tried again yesterday but it looks like I sanded too fine this time because the stain didn't absorb much at all. I don't have any blotching, but now I don't have much color either! If I add another coat and leave it on will this help? Is there anything else I can do. The minwax can says not too sand between coats.
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post #2 of 10 Old 02-12-2020, 12:33 PM
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Yes you can do another coat to darken it.

Pine is not an easy wood to stain especially if there are knots.

Robert
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post #3 of 10 Old 02-12-2020, 03:39 PM
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If applying a second coat doesn't give you the desired results, try applying the stain with 120 grit sandpaper dipped in stain. It's a method I've used for years to do touch-ups, but it may do what you need for your situation.


Come to think of it, I normally use 120 grit, but for your situation, maybe 180 grit would be better.

Just to be clear, you don't use a rag or anything else to apply the stain...just the wet sandpaper. Then you wipe it off as-normal, with a rag.
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post #4 of 10 Old 02-12-2020, 04:42 PM Thread Starter
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Well, I did another coat and it ended up looking worse! Didn't absorb much more either. I sanded the whole table down to bare bones again. UGH! I am afraid I am not going to have a table left since I have restained and sanded so much. I am close to throwing in the towel because the wood condition is getting worse. I should have quit while I was ahead way back, but here I am. I could try redoing again, but only sand to 220 which is what I should have done in the first place. I am battling black blotches and uneven stain vs. even stain with fine sanding, but minimal stain absorption. I feel like I am completely nuts for keeping at this for so long. I am so frustrated and worn out. I believe one of the pieces of wood on the top may be fir and the other 2 pine which makes things more difficult.

Last edited by RNrunner; 02-12-2020 at 04:45 PM.
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post #5 of 10 Old 02-12-2020, 08:20 PM Thread Starter
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Here is what I am working with now. I am afraid to do anything to it at the moment because I am not about ready to redo this again. Can anyone post some pics of pieces made of pine or fir they have stained or finished with oil. Maybe I will get an inspiration!
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Last edited by RNrunner; 02-12-2020 at 08:23 PM.
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post #6 of 10 Old 02-13-2020, 08:00 AM
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Here's what I'd do. First would be throw away the minwax stain. Way to many solids for soft construction grade lumber. Pick up a bottle of TransTint or the like. Mix with water (raises the grain) or alcohol (doesn't raise the grain) and dye a sample piece. I find dye much easier to deal with.
And no more furniture from floor joists 😁.
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post #7 of 10 Old 02-13-2020, 10:36 AM
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Itís pine, it looks fine. Put on a sealer and be done with it.

Really, pine does not stain well. It never has and never will.

Put stuff on the stand and I can guarantee everyone will think it looks fine. You will be the only person not satisfied.
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post #8 of 10 Old 02-13-2020, 03:34 PM Thread Starter
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Quote:
Originally Posted by 12penny View Post
Here's what I'd do. First would be throw away the minwax stain. Way to many solids for soft construction grade lumber. Pick up a bottle of TransTint or the like. Mix with water (raises the grain) or alcohol (doesn't raise the grain) and dye a sample piece. I find dye much easier to deal with.
And no more furniture from floor joists 😁.
Thanks for the advice. I have don't know much about transtint or dye. Do you have to spray it on? How can you achieve a color that looks other than brown or yellow. I know with stain you get variations of color.
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post #9 of 10 Old 02-13-2020, 03:36 PM Thread Starter
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Terry Q View Post
Itís pine, it looks fine. Put on a sealer and be done with it.

Really, pine does not stain well. It never has and never will.

Put stuff on the stand and I can guarantee everyone will think it looks fine. You will be the only person not satisfied.
I am sure you are right, but it seems like it will be so plain. what type of finish would give you a rich finish. I plan to paint the legs and base white.
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post #10 of 10 Old 02-14-2020, 09:27 PM
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With TransTint dye you can spray, brush, or wipe them on. You can also mix them with shellac or your waterborne clear finish of choice. When you apply them straight on the wood (not toning) it is fool proof. Too light, apply another coat. Too dark, dampen a rag with water or DNA and wipe some off. It is recommended to use distilled water. I only do so with high tanin woods and have never had a problem.
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