Refinishing lane trunk - Woodworking Talk - Woodworkers Forum
 
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post #1 of 8 Old 08-15-2017, 06:58 PM Thread Starter
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Refinishing lane trunk

So I have a lane trunk that I received as a wedding present from my uncle who's a realitor. The tops finish is scratched and as is the front. I'd like to restore/refinish it needing advice and recommendations. Thanks in advance. Below is the serial number.

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post #2 of 8 Old 08-15-2017, 08:38 PM
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Lane used lacquer for a finish. If it's just surface scratches you might be able to touch it up. If you do plan on refinishing then start with paint and varnish remover. It's a messy job but if you are patient anyone can strip furniture. The best retail remover I've used is Klean Strip.
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post #3 of 8 Old 08-15-2017, 08:51 PM Thread Starter
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Thank you, I'll post pics of the finish tomorrow.

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post #4 of 8 Old 08-16-2017, 11:57 AM Thread Starter
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Here are the pictures, hopefully they post correctly. Thoughts and any advice to fix it would be greatly appreciated.

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post #5 of 8 Old 08-16-2017, 03:09 PM
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That looks pretty much like just surface damage to me. I would try just touching up before going all out on a refinish. Lacquer is quite forgiving and easy to touch up.

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post #6 of 8 Old 08-16-2017, 03:33 PM Thread Starter
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Quote:
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That looks pretty much like just surface damage to me. I would try just touching up before going all out on a refinish. Lacquer is quite forgiving and easy to touch up.

George
Thanks I'll try that route first.

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post #7 of 8 Old 08-16-2017, 11:54 PM
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We have that same model chest. It belonged to my mother and my daughter has it in her room now.

From where you are what I would do is first clean it with a wax and grease remover. Do it several times frequently changing rags. The wax and grease remover will soften or liquefy the furniture polish build up on the finish and the rags will absorb it.

Then get a paint sprayer if you don't already have one and mix some lacquer the sheen you want pretty thin and spray a small spot on one corner and see what happens. If it sprays smooth and level then you can scuff sand the whole chest with 220 grit or finer paper and spray the entire thing. If the finish wrinkles up like water on a freshly waxed car then stop. Google fisheye finish and see if that is what you have. If so go to a auto parts store that sells automotive paint and ask to order a product called smoothie. It's an additive you can add to the lacquer to make the finish flow out. Oddly enough the problem is caused by silicone contained in aerosol furniture polish and the smoothie is made out of silicone. The cure is the cause. Since smoothie is silicone be careful not to spray any new wood with it and be sure to dispose of any sandpaper used for between the coats sanding. You can transfer silicone from one project to another from the sandpaper or rags you might use so keep all these products separate.

Anyway when you put a fresh coat of finish over the top I think you would be amazed how much the scratches disappear. If you have some deeper scratches that are still there you can brush some lacquer on the scratches with a small narrow artist brush to fill the scratches. Then when you are working the finish you can sand the finish down that you filled with a brush and when sprayed with lacquer they will go away.
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post #8 of 8 Old 08-17-2017, 06:35 AM Thread Starter
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Steve Neul View Post
We have that same model chest. It belonged to my mother and my daughter has it in her room now.

From where you are what I would do is first clean it with a wax and grease remover. Do it several times frequently changing rags. The wax and grease remover will soften or liquefy the furniture polish build up on the finish and the rags will absorb it.

Then get a paint sprayer if you don't already have one and mix some lacquer the sheen you want pretty thin and spray a small spot on one corner and see what happens. If it sprays smooth and level then you can scuff sand the whole chest with 220 grit or finer paper and spray the entire thing. If the finish wrinkles up like water on a freshly waxed car then stop. Google fisheye finish and see if that is what you have. If so go to a auto parts store that sells automotive paint and ask to order a product called smoothie. It's an additive you can add to the lacquer to make the finish flow out. Oddly enough the problem is caused by silicone contained in aerosol furniture polish and the smoothie is made out of silicone. The cure is the cause. Since smoothie is silicone be careful not to spray any new wood with it and be sure to dispose of any sandpaper used for between the coats sanding. You can transfer silicone from one project to another from the sandpaper or rags you might use so keep all these products separate.

Anyway when you put a fresh coat of finish over the top I think you would be amazed how much the scratches disappear. If you have some deeper scratches that are still there you can brush some lacquer on the scratches with a small narrow artist brush to fill the scratches. Then when you are working the finish you can sand the finish down that you filled with a brush and when sprayed with lacquer they will go away.
Awesome thanks for the info!

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