Putting the finishing touches on a rifle stock - Need advice - Woodworking Talk - Woodworkers Forum
 4Likes
  • 2 Post By GeorgeC
  • 1 Post By hawkeye10
  • 1 Post By dan147
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
post #1 of 17 Old 12-13-2019, 07:08 PM Thread Starter
Junior Member
 
Join Date: Dec 2019
Posts: 3
View dan147's Photo Album My Photos
Putting the finishing touches on a rifle stock - Need advice

Hi all. I acquired a Vietnam-era Chinese SKS. Manufactured at the famed Jianshe Arsenal #26. I managed to score this rifle for $220. Sadly, the rifle stock was in quite bad condition. I decided to restore it. I need some advice!

It had a couple cracks, and was in pretty bad shape:

Putting the finishing touches on a rifle stock - Need advice-1.jpg

First, I gave it a nice bath in some mineral spirits to remove the excess Cosmoline. After letting it dry, I coated it in Citristrip and let it sit for an hour, and rinsed it in hot water.

Putting the finishing touches on a rifle stock - Need advice-2.jpg

I repeated it one more time. It ended up looking really good, all of the finish was gone.

Then I took a heat gun to it, and did my best to work all of the excess oil out of the stock. (military rifles are heavily oiled, and are usually quite dark. This was no exception)

I then used Citrisstrip one more time.

From there, I used PC products "woody" epoxy. I did my best to get it in the crack, then let it sit in a vice for a couple days:

Putting the finishing touches on a rifle stock - Need advice-3.jpg

After that I sanded as best I could with some 180 and 220 grit.

This is how the stock is now:

Putting the finishing touches on a rifle stock - Need advice-4.jpg

Putting the finishing touches on a rifle stock - Need advice-sks2.jpg


I have a few questions for y'all:

1. After sanding, I noticed that there are some lighter and darker areas, as my sand job wasn't perfect. Will these be visible after staining? I plan on using Minwax penetrating stain (gunstock #231) and Minwax wipe-on-poly. If so, what should I do to make it more even? If it's not an issue, am I good to stain now?

#2. What is the best way to color match PC products epoxy? Apparently it is designed to accept stains and dyes. My idea was to hit it with a Q-tip dipped in my stain to darken it, before staining the entire rest of the stock. Has anyone worked with this stuff before?

thank you!

Dan

Last edited by dan147; 12-13-2019 at 07:37 PM. Reason: added one more pic
dan147 is offline  
Sponsored Links
Advertisement
 
post #2 of 17 Old 12-13-2019, 07:17 PM
Moderator
 
John Smith_inFL's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2018
Location: Central Florida
Posts: 1,411
View John Smith_inFL's Photo Album My Photos
Dan - welcome to the forum.
I am a big fan of Bondo for wood repairs.
Bondo and other hard fillers do not take stain well.
I only do it when the project will be painted.
I strongly suggest you find some similar wood and practice
before you get too deep into it and possibly onto the road of no return.

.

.

-- I am a painter. That's what I do. I paint things --

Last edited by John Smith_inFL; 12-13-2019 at 07:27 PM.
John Smith_inFL is online now  
post #3 of 17 Old 12-13-2019, 08:42 PM
Member
 
Join Date: Nov 2019
Posts: 53
View B Coll's Photo Album My Photos
Dan-Minwax is an oil based stain that delivers it's color by sediment embedding in the grain. I would not recommend that for a fine historic piece, such as yours. I would suggest exploring aniline dyes. The dyes can be delivered directly to the wood with a cloth, or sprayed. They can be mixed with water, or denatured alcohol. They can also be used as a toner, which I prefer. When using as a toner you mix the dye with the finish of your choice, as long as they are compatible. The benefit of toning is you can carefully build the color, and add or subtract color from certain areas. The great benefit is you get a very even color, even over difficult woods such as maple and cherry, or in your case aged wood which may be inconsistent. Good luck and have fun.
B Coll is offline  
Sponsored Links
Advertisement
 
post #4 of 17 Old 12-13-2019, 11:34 PM
Member
 
Join Date: Oct 2011
Posts: 85
View sancho57's Photo Album My Photos
Not sure about the PC epoxy.
Never fooled with it.
But once you stain it, if there are lighter areas you could always use some toner to help darken it to match.
sancho57 is offline  
post #5 of 17 Old 12-14-2019, 07:57 PM Thread Starter
Junior Member
 
Join Date: Dec 2019
Posts: 3
View dan147's Photo Album My Photos
thanks John (my apologies), and thanks all for posting. Good advice. I'm gonna order and test some dyes on a sample of the pc-woody epoxy, and see how it turns out. If I can get a fairly close match with dye, I'm gonna mask the piece off, and stain just the epoxy'd portions. We'll see
dan147 is offline  
post #6 of 17 Old 12-14-2019, 08:30 PM
where's my table saw?
 
woodnthings's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2009
Location: SE, Michigan
Posts: 26,253
View woodnthings's Photo Album My Photos
Lipstick on a pig?

This stock has a well used worn look so no need to make it pretty. JMO. Emphasize the worn look by staining it darker and immediately wiping the stain off. It will fill in the low spots and dents and give it a more uniform look. An oil finish will work best and avoid any other types of finish since it most likely won't adhere anyway.




The answer to your question will only be as detailed and specific as the question is detailed and specific. Good questions also include a sketch or a photo that illustrates your issue. (:< D)
woodnthings is offline  
post #7 of 17 Old 12-14-2019, 09:13 PM
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Jul 2008
Location: Florida Panhandle
Posts: 11,971
View GeorgeC's Photo Album My Photos
What is your intended use of this rifle?


George
GeorgeC is online now  
post #8 of 17 Old 12-15-2019, 01:12 AM
Ancient Termite
 
Join Date: Mar 2018
Location: Huntington Beach, California
Posts: 601
View NoThankyou's Photo Album My Photos
I would avoid the wipe on poly. It is just an over thinned poly. If you want the finish to be more like a typical gun stock rather than plastic, use Minwax Antique Oil Finish. A couple of coats of MAOF and the gun stock will have the look and feel of a typical gun stock.

As for the stain/dye process. Test the stain on the original wood first, underneath the trigger plate. Then match the PC stuff to that color.

Rich
In furniture 1/32" is a Grand Canyon
NoThankyou is offline  
post #9 of 17 Old 12-15-2019, 10:05 AM
Senior Member
 
hawkeye10's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2015
Location: Murfreesboro, Tn.
Posts: 1,146
View hawkeye10's Photo Album My Photos
If it was mine I would look for an aftermarket stock or a used stock in good condition. A lot of military rifles had their stocks replaced at one time or another, so if you are interested in keeping it original that is going to be slim. You might look for a serial number on your stock.
woodnthings likes this.

Don in Murfreesboro, TN.
hawkeye10 is online now  
post #10 of 17 Old 12-15-2019, 02:49 PM
Senior Member
 
Pineknot_86's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2016
Posts: 1,926
View Pineknot_86's Photo Album My Photos
Serial number, if any, will be on the action. Pondering the history of the rifle, there probably isn't one. If you are considering to shoot it, take it to a qualified gunsmith and let him inspect it first. Too many things that could present a problem.

A diamond is how coal reacts under pressure.
Pineknot_86 is offline  
post #11 of 17 Old 12-15-2019, 03:32 PM
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Jul 2008
Location: Florida Panhandle
Posts: 11,971
View GeorgeC's Photo Album My Photos
Quote:
Originally Posted by Pineknot_86 View Post
Serial number, if any, will be on the action. Pondering the history of the rifle, there probably isn't one. If you are considering to shoot it, take it to a qualified gunsmith and let him inspect it first. Too many things that could present a problem.

Good advice. If the stock is in that bad of condition there is no telling how bad the rest of the rifle is. I would not want to fire it if not first inspected by gun smith.



I would expect a serial number on the metal part. Most of the SKS for sale list a serial number. Cannot find any information about that arsenal in my Gun Digest.


George
GeorgeC is online now  
post #12 of 17 Old 12-15-2019, 09:27 PM
Senior Member
 
Pineknot_86's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2016
Posts: 1,926
View Pineknot_86's Photo Album My Photos
Quote:
Originally Posted by GeorgeC View Post
Good advice. If the stock is in that bad of condition there is no telling how bad the rest of the rifle is. I would not want to fire it if not first inspected by gun smith.



I would expect a serial number on the metal part. Most of the SKS for sale list a serial number. Cannot find any information about that arsenal in my Gun Digest.


George
All firearms sold in the US now must have a serial number. Many old firearms didn't have serial numbers. A gunsmith tried to buy a collector firearm that didn't have a serial number. He even offered to have a serial number put on and recorded by the BATFE. They said no and destroyed it. Meshuggah!

A diamond is how coal reacts under pressure.
Pineknot_86 is offline  
post #13 of 17 Old 12-16-2019, 07:19 AM
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Jul 2008
Location: Florida Panhandle
Posts: 11,971
View GeorgeC's Photo Album My Photos
Looks like this person posted once and then left.


George
GeorgeC is online now  
post #14 of 17 Old 12-17-2019, 01:28 AM
Generic Weeb
 
WeebyWoodWorker's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2017
Location: Gorgeous Oregon!
Posts: 944
View WeebyWoodWorker's Photo Album My Photos
Quote:
Originally Posted by John Smith_inFL View Post
I am a big fan of Bondo for wood repairs.
Bondo and other hard fillers do not take stain well.
.

I use bondo all the time on paint grade materials. That stuff is fantastic, as long as your sand and paint job is good you'll never tell. Sands nice, cuts nice and spreads nice. Love it. True it my not stain well but you can mix it with colouring to a certain extent.


-T
WeebyWoodWorker is offline  
post #15 of 17 Old 12-19-2019, 11:38 AM Thread Starter
Junior Member
 
Join Date: Dec 2019
Posts: 3
View dan147's Photo Album My Photos
Hi folks, sorry for the silence. Thank you all for the advice, there's some great info here.

I ordered an analine dye pack on Amazon, as well as some Minwax Antique Oil Finish.

The reason I'm wanting to save this stock is because it's a serial number matching rifle. The wood is stamped with the s/n, which matches all the other metal bits, and the receiver.

I did have it checked out by a gunsmith, and he did a variety of tests on it including headspace. Everything is functioning properly. He even gave me a compliment on how good the bluing is. It's definitely strange, but it seems the stock is the only part that took abuse. He told me it looks like a soldier threw the rifle from a great height, or maybe someone landed on it jumping from an armored vehicle.

This will never be a collectors item, I intend it to be a shooter. But still, I want to hide the epoxy as much as possible just for my sanity. Right now the stock works great its just really ugly
John Smith_inFL likes this.
dan147 is offline  
post #16 of 17 Old 12-19-2019, 02:35 PM
Senior Member
 
_Ogre's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2013
Location: Motown
Posts: 457
View _Ogre's Photo Album My Photos
after staining the filler areas will be lighter, just use the gunk in the bottom of the can that settles out of the stain after a few days to darken those lighter sections. the gunk is already color matched
_Ogre is offline  
post #17 of 17 Old 12-24-2019, 10:12 AM
Junior Member
 
Join Date: Dec 2019
Posts: 14
View jdutton24's Photo Album My Photos
Quote:
Originally Posted by dan147 View Post

This will never be a collectors item, I intend it to be a shooter. But still, I want to hide the epoxy as much as possible just for my sanity. Right now the stock works great its just really ugly
You might could try some shellac, either amber or garnett. You could even use some transtint and some sealcoat. Very easy to work with and touch up. Probably more accurate of time era finish as well. If it were me, (depending on the epoxy variable). Id use shellac, either tinted or just buy what ever color u want from ebay and mix with denatured alcohol and use multiple coats or just one. Or use Minwax antique oil finish. Its a mix of i think it BLO, varnish and mineral spirits.

I refinished several AKM furniture sets and I actually mixed up my own pine tar. Since i live in a forest of pine trees, I went out and gathered some resin leaking from a few trees, put that resin into an old polyurethane can and put in a fire to melt it but not burn it. I put the resin in aluminum foil (concave shape) and punched some small holes in the bottom. then placed that into the can and put the lid on. The resin melted and flowed down the holes into the bottom while particles and leftovers stayed in the foil. I removed from the fire and (must work quickly) had a separate container with a little bit of gum turpentine to keep it from solidifying. I then mixed thoroughly and then after it cooled applied that to the birch laminate for a really neat effect.

Last edited by jdutton24; 12-24-2019 at 10:19 AM.
jdutton24 is offline  
Reply

Tags
finish, rifle, sks, stain

Quick Reply
Message:
Options

Register Now



In order to be able to post messages on the Woodworking Talk - Woodworkers Forum forums, you must first register.
Please enter your desired user name, your email address and other required details in the form below.

User Name:
Password
Please enter a password for your user account. Note that passwords are case-sensitive.

Password:


Confirm Password:
Email Address
Please enter a valid email address for yourself.

Email Address:
OR

Log-in










Thread Tools
Show Printable Version Show Printable Version
Email this Page Email this Page
Display Modes
Linear Mode Linear Mode



Posting Rules  
You may post new threads
You may post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off

 
For the best viewing experience please update your browser to Google Chrome