Primer on raw wood - Woodworking Talk - Woodworkers Forum
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post #1 of 42 Old 05-13-2020, 08:49 AM Thread Starter
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Question Primer on raw wood

I was wondering if it's recommended to prime before painting raw wood. I will be painting the legs/trim of my tv stand white and I bought a clear primer, but I'm having trouble seeing exactly where or how much I'm applying and it's not going on very smooth. I bought clear in case I want to distress, but now I'm not so sure that was a good idea!
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post #2 of 42 Old 05-13-2020, 08:56 AM
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RN - what is the primer that you have ??

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post #3 of 42 Old 05-13-2020, 09:14 AM Thread Starter
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Originally Posted by John Smith_inFL View Post
RN - what is the primer that you have ??

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It is from a brand called Wise owl. It's their clear stain eliminating primer.
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post #4 of 42 Old 05-13-2020, 09:36 AM
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I am not familiar with that brand or type of primer or paints.
if I see it, I would like to try it.
I would say to apply it just like a varnish or polyurethane.
use the light to your advantage to maintain the wet edge and
even thickness of the coatings. if it is leaving marks, I would
see how to thin it - it may be too thick for your climatic conditions.
to answer your question: yes, I like to prime all bare wood first.
sorry, but that's all I have.

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post #5 of 42 Old 05-13-2020, 09:45 AM
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Like John, I am not familiar with that product but I prime bare wood before painting most of the time. In some cases I seal with Nitrocellulose sanding sealer and then paint but I don't do that as often as using primer.

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post #6 of 42 Old 05-13-2020, 10:53 AM Thread Starter
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OK. Thanks. I just tried to reapply again. It was still a bit difficult but I'll see when it dries.
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post #7 of 42 Old 05-13-2020, 01:54 PM Thread Starter
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Quote:
Originally Posted by John Smith_inFL View Post
I am not familiar with that brand or type of primer or paints.
if I see it, I would like to try it.
I would say to apply it just like a varnish or polyurethane.
use the light to your advantage to maintain the wet edge and
even thickness of the coatings. if it is leaving marks, I would
see how to thin it - it may be too thick for your climatic conditions.
to answer your question: yes, I like to prime all bare wood first.
sorry, but that's all I have.

.
I know some people use a car wash sponge to apply clear coats like polycrylic. Would this work with primer?
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post #8 of 42 Old 05-13-2020, 02:43 PM
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RN - apparently, you have a product that not too many people are familiar with.
if we had a can of it now, we would have to experiment just as you have to.
I am a painter - I use brushes.
the only time I use a sponge or cloth is for special effects in a painted project.
(photos available on request).

hopefully, someone that has actually used Wise Owl products will chime in.

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Last edited by John Smith_inFL; 05-13-2020 at 02:47 PM.
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post #9 of 42 Old 05-13-2020, 03:01 PM
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Never heard of that brand before. Is it possible it needs a little thinner?
What kind of thinner it is compatible with should be in the directions. If not, call tech support which hopefully has a phone number on the can. DO NOT use just any primer. It must be compatible with that product or you will have a real mess.

As for your original question, the finishing product, which in your case is paint, should tell you on that label if a primer is required or recommended and usually which type of primer to use. If you get on the internet and look up your finishing product (paint), you should find a document labeled PDS or Product Data Sheet. That should tell you pretty much all you need to know as far as the coating process.

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Last edited by Tony B; 05-13-2020 at 03:08 PM.
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post #10 of 42 Old 05-13-2020, 03:23 PM
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When in doubt, do a search ......

Here's what came up in a search:
https://wiseowlpaint.com/product/sta...terior-primer/



Description

Wise Owl Stain Eliminating Primer is an exceptional quality, multi-purpose, interior/exterior primer, sealer, and stain killer. This versatile, primer is exceptional for covering many types of stains and providing adhesion on a wide variety of hard to stick to surfaces. For use on drywall, plaster, wood, primed steel, galvanized, aluminum, copper and tile in dry environments. Our Stain Eliminating Primer also sticks to a wide variety of plastics but a test patch is always recommended on plastic surfaces.
Stain Eliminating Primer is available in Clear, White, and Gray, in Quarts and Gallons. It will effectively block tannins and it is an amazing bonding primer.
Coverage per Quart: Approximately 160 square feet

Application Advice:
The surface must be clean and free of dirt, grease, grime, wax, and chalk. Remove all loose or flaking paint by scraping, wire brushing or sanding. Fill all holes and cracks and any voids or surface imperfections.
Stir product with a circular, lifting motion until the product is uniform throughout.
Wise Owl Stain Eliminating Primer may be applied by brush and roller or by spray. For best brush application results, use a quality nylon/polyester brush and a 3/8” nap cover. It may be thinned with up to 10% water for spray application.


And it's very expensive! So, there you all are right from the manufacturer.
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The answer to your question will only be as detailed and specific as the question is detailed and specific. Good questions also include a sketch or a photo that illustrates your issue. (:< D)
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post #11 of 42 Old 05-13-2020, 03:30 PM
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I just found what Bill shows above. Could not find a PDS or MSDS for it which is surprising for any chemical, safe or not.
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post #12 of 42 Old 05-13-2020, 07:30 PM Thread Starter
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Yes it was very expensive and the clear was a big sticky mess. I sanded part of it off...probably should have waited because it destroyed my sandpaper. They say you don't have to use a primer with their chalk synthesis paint but then at the same time most of the people in the FB group prime everything as a "best Practice". So, I thought I was doing the right thing, but now I'm very discouraged. I thought painting was supposed to be fun!
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post #13 of 42 Old 05-13-2020, 07:31 PM Thread Starter
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What is a nitrocellulose sanding sealer? I've never heard of it?
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post #14 of 42 Old 05-13-2020, 07:34 PM Thread Starter
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post #15 of 42 Old 05-13-2020, 07:36 PM Thread Starter
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Tony B View Post
I just found what Bill shows above. Could not find a PDS or MSDS for it which is surprising for any chemical, safe or not.
I found this information.
https://wiseowlpaint.com/wp-content/...-Clear-SDS.pdf
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post #16 of 42 Old 05-13-2020, 07:40 PM Thread Starter
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Quote:
Originally Posted by John Smith_inFL View Post
RN - apparently, you have a product that not too many people are familiar with.
if we had a can of it now, we would have to experiment just as you have to.
I am a painter - I use brushes.
the only time I use a sponge or cloth is for special effects in a painted project.
(photos available on request).

hopefully, someone that has actually used Wise Owl products will chime in.

.
Hi John, I found this information about the ingredients. Any thoughts?
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File Type: pdf 9154-Wise-Owl-Stain-Eliminating-Primer-Clear-SDS.pdf (262.4 KB, 9 views)
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post #17 of 42 Old 05-13-2020, 08:21 PM
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a drop of turpentine, a drop of kerosene, two drops of acetone, some mineral spirits.

that is just the Safety Data Sheet.
all I see of interest to me is Thin with Water.
to me, I would experiment with thinning with water to suit
my current climatic conditions.
this reminds me of when I was giving a sign painting seminar
in my shop on how to "modify" sign painting enamels for different
climatic conditions.
as you know, many things are painted under different conditions.
so we adapt, improvise and overcome to get that satisfactory project.
tell us what you have done so far to "modify" the primer to suit your needs.
and, what is the temperature and humidity where you are working.

Primer on raw wood-oneshot.jpg

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post #18 of 42 Old 05-13-2020, 11:12 PM Thread Starter
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Quote:
Originally Posted by John Smith_inFL View Post
that is just the Safety Data Sheet.
all I see of interest to me is Thin with Water.
to me, I would experiment with thinning with water to suit
my current climatic conditions.
this reminds me of when I was giving a sign painting seminar
in my shop on how to "modify" sign painting enamels for different
climatic conditions.
as you know, many things are painted under different conditions.
so we adapt, improvise and overcome to get that satisfactory project.
tell us what you have done so far to "modify" the primer to suit your needs.
and, what is the temperature and humidity where you are working.

Attachment 389313

.
I posted the information to see if you had any knowledge of the ingredients used in this particular primer. Someone earlier mentioned that they couldn't find this information.
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post #19 of 42 Old 05-14-2020, 07:47 AM
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no, I do not see anything that would be of consumer interest
other than Ethylene Glycol. which is a common ingredient in
many paints and coatings.

did you do any thinning with water on the first coats ?''

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post #20 of 42 Old 05-14-2020, 08:39 AM Thread Starter
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I didn't because someone had done a video saying not to, but then I just saw another one today and they said adding some water to your brush will help. I follow the groups FB page, but now I'm seeing that everything may not be accurate! I am going to try an area using a wet brush or thinned a bit and see if that helps. Thanks.
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