powders or liquids for grain touch ups - Woodworking Talk - Woodworkers Forum
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post #1 of 7 Old 09-16-2019, 06:39 AM Thread Starter
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powders or liquids for grain touch ups

I have been wanting to invest in a proper wood touch up kit for color matching repairs for furniture, but am wondering if any knowledgeable furniture repairers would like to wade in on some advice. Currently I am looking at a Mohawk kit https://mohawk-finishing.com/product...-grain-system/ which is the liquid kit. Having said that, I see that there is a kit with powders as well https://www.mohawk-finishing.com/pro...er-stains-kit/
Is there a big difference in how they work, or is one preferable over another?
Any help would be great.
Thanks
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post #2 of 7 Old 09-16-2019, 07:37 AM
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welcome to the forum !
when you get time, please complete your profile with your location.

please tell us a little about yourself and the type of work you do presently.
and - how deep do you want to go into "repair and refinishing" ??
looking forward to seeing some of your projects.

(to answer your question: I personally like the powder over liquid
stains. they are easier to mix into most mediums such as lacquer, shellac,
polyurethanes, varnish, etc. some of the liquids don't play well with cover finishes).

eventually, if you want to get more involved in the craft, get a kit of the
colored burn-in sticks and epoxy putty sticks as well.
[some hand tools are also necessary: but that will have to be another thread].
when I first started furniture repair back in the '80s, I picked up old (road kill)
wooden furniture of different types and cut them up into manageable
pieces and intentionally "messed them up" to practice on. one thing that
needs a LOT of practice is veneer - hundreds of different types have
been used over the past century in all kinds of furniture. practice on
repairing and color matching veneer surfaces and you will be golden.
furniture repair is a craft that requires a lot of practice.
invest in some books on "Furniture Repair and Refinishing". most will cover
the mixing and use of powder and liquid stains and dyes.

.
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Last edited by John Smith_inFL; 09-16-2019 at 09:32 AM.
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post #3 of 7 Old 09-16-2019, 03:44 PM Thread Starter
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Thanks for the information. In your opinion what is the one book that you think covers this the best?
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post #4 of 7 Old 09-16-2019, 04:40 PM
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I can not recommend just "one" book for this topic. (hopefully other members can).
I suggest you go to Amazon and search for "Furniture Repair and Refinishing"
and "Using Wood Dyes and Stains". many used books for less than $10.
your local library should have a few books on the subject as well - free to use
and return at your convenience.
if this is really something that you would like to expand your knowledge in, I would
get a few books by different authors.
I haven't looked, but there are probably videos on YouTube. look for: "Dyes and Stains"
I know that Charles Neal has a superb video library of finishing and repair on YouTube.

what is your background ? do you have experience in any kind of furniture projects ?
if you are just starting from scratch, it could become pretty frustrating if you start
learning in the wrong direction. meaning, you need to have a background in using
different finishes and how to apply them before you can fix them.
the same with adhesives. over the past century, many glues were used in furniture
manufacture and repair. you need to be able to determine what you are
working with before you can fix it.
wishing you all the best in your endeavors.

I forgot to add that one item that is very useful in the craft is the
"Finisher's Color Wheel" which helps with mixing stains and dyes to achieve
the desired color. (sign painters have one for mixing sign painting enamels).
they reduce the "guesswork" considerably with obtaining the correct color match
which in turn, saves you time and money.
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Last edited by John Smith_inFL; 09-17-2019 at 08:38 AM.
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post #5 of 7 Old 09-18-2019, 07:58 PM Thread Starter
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I have experience in woodworking and turning. I also predominately use lacquer for finishing (sprayed using my Fuji turbine sprayer), and French polishing for special pieces.
I think I have decided on going with the Blendal touch up powders, but am on a budget and won`t be getting the master kit, which is over $700 up here. Most likely I will get the much smaller 12 pack, but am wondering what the best colors are to start with. I`m assuming the umbers and siennas are the first to get, but if I had to pick just twelve, which would get the most color range for repair work.
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post #6 of 7 Old 09-19-2019, 12:26 PM
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I've not use Mohawk dyes, but I know they have excellent products.

I use a fair amount of Transtint (liquid). I also use JE Moser they have a wide array of powders.


I think powders are easier to control than liquids, and some liquids are water based to that can be an issue.


Thomas Johnson Furniture Restoration is an excellent source (YouTube).
Color matching is hugely challenging (for me) but magical when it works!!
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post #7 of 7 Old 09-20-2019, 11:17 PM
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Id use the powder. The powder is all Ive used. You can control the amount of color when you mix them to match a stain.
I dont know what you want to do. Mohawk offers a lot of different kits for furniture touch up and repair. Crayons (soft fill, Hard fill, Colored markers , colored epoxies .

As far as books for furniture repair, Jeff Jewitt makes a good one. May not get as deep into the weeds as you'd like.

However Mohawk suppliers do offer training classes in finishing and repair. here is one near my house. I suggest contacting the one in your neck of the woods. hey cover using the powder ad mixing stains in the class
https://woodrepairproducts.com/training/
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