Oversanding repair - Woodworking Talk - Woodworkers Forum
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post #1 of 14 Old 08-02-2019, 09:55 PM Thread Starter
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Oversanding repair

A table was brought into the senior center wood shop to have top refinished and an over eager person sanded through the mahogany veneer, it's about an 1 1/2" in diameter in the middle of the top. I don't know how to fix it, any suggestions aside from stripping off and replacing the existing veneer which I probably will have to end up doing, a patch would stand out as the grain would not match.

The table is an antique, 12" x 24", to me it is an embarrassment to have something looking worse than when it came in, so maybe someone has a fix I could try?
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post #2 of 14 Old 08-02-2019, 10:07 PM
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It's not really a DIY project to re-veneer a dining room table. You would have to either have a veneer press or a vacuum bag big enough to fit the table. The peal and press veneer is terrible and applying veneer with contact cement is equally as bad. Then you would have to do the entire top including the leaves to have matching wood. You might stain the table dark and do a faux finish on the sand through.

Last edited by Steve Neul; 08-02-2019 at 10:11 PM.
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post #3 of 14 Old 08-03-2019, 12:12 AM
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Does it have to go out looking the same as when it came in? It would be possible to make an inlay in a contrasting shape or grain and turn it into a feature. That would be a lot less trouble than a complete new top.
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post #4 of 14 Old 08-03-2019, 06:30 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Steve Neul View Post
It's not really a DIY project to re-veneer a dining room table. You would have to either have a veneer press or a vacuum bag big enough to fit the table. The peal and press veneer is terrible and applying veneer with contact cement is equally as bad. Then you would have to do the entire top including the leaves to have matching wood. You might stain the table dark and do a faux finish on the sand through.

It is only 12 inches by 24 inches. Still might be outside the capabilities of this poster since he did not post any infomation about the shops capabilities.


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post #5 of 14 Old 08-03-2019, 06:32 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by sunnybob View Post
Does it have to go out looking the same as when it came in? It would be possible to make an inlay in a contrasting shape or grain and turn it into a feature. That would be a lot less trouble than a complete new top.

If you took a job to a shop, would you not expect it to come back looking exactly the same as it was taken. I would!!!


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post #6 of 14 Old 08-03-2019, 06:47 AM
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That was why I asked the question.
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post #7 of 14 Old 08-03-2019, 08:10 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by redeared View Post
The table is an antique, 12" x 24", to me it is an embarrassment to have something
looking worse than when it came in, so maybe someone has a fix I could try?
Red - what services does the Senior Center provide ?
is the wood shop operated by experienced and professional craftsmen ?
what are the expectations of a customer when they come in ?
was the customer expecting a Rembrandt Restoration type of repair or finish ?
my thoughts also go to: are there any signs in the "shop" that states the
skill level and qualifications of the workers being top notch or just volunteers doing
something to keep them busy in their Golden Years. and ~ is there a work order or
contract involved with all kinds of disclaimers ??
a few good clear photos would help the members here help you.

Personally, I would stop right where you are . . . have the customer come in and look at it
and explain the situation and the two of you can discuss the options available.
as said above. repairing and/or replacing "antique" veneer is not really a DIY project.
if the customer wants to proceed with techniques within the skill sets of the center,
then you can go that route.
if the customer wants you to stop and take his/her table to a "professional" repair shop,
that would be best for both him/her and you and your associates.
[also - there are sooooooo many "opinions" of what is just old and what is an "antique".
and is the table a family heirloom or something they bought at a Thrift Shop ?
but for right now, I would stop all work and contact the customer to come in for a consult.
jus my Dos Centavos

.

.

-- I am a painter. That's what I do. I paint things --

Last edited by John Smith_inFL; 08-03-2019 at 09:19 AM.
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post #8 of 14 Old 08-03-2019, 10:07 PM Thread Starter
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Not to belittle the skill level of the volunteers in the shop ( most 85+) with little prior woodworking skills but they are there doing what they can, gluing up a lose chair spindle is fine, I'm not in charge so I don't overstep but I voice my opinion.
Since I joined the group a couple of years ago I have been told expectations of a good finished product has risen by word of mouth as we take in a lot more work than before, so I don't want to screw up on this.
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post #9 of 14 Old 08-03-2019, 11:30 PM
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Unfortunately, it sounds like you will have to re-veneer the top.
If anyone there has ever veneered plywood or Formica, it's a piece of cake. Not very difficult at all if someone there has any experience at it. It's more about knowing what not to do.

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Retired woodworker, amongst other things, Sold full time cruising boat and now full time cruising in RV. Currently in Somerville, Tx
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post #10 of 14 Old 08-16-2019, 09:33 PM Thread Starter
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I took the table home, I had some 3/4" mahogany scraps that where bowed and long enough, so I planed them down to the 1/2" thickness of the old top, routered the edge to match the profile, matched the original stain and then 3 coats of poly, came out really good. Yeah it cost me out of my pocket but I was too embarrassed to return a flawed product. I put a $25 donation fee to the Center to the customer for the work, really cheap but I would rather have a good reputation on the quality of a finished product.
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post #11 of 14 Old 08-16-2019, 10:26 PM
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Come on guys ......

Quote:
Originally Posted by redeared View Post
A table was brought into the senior center wood shop to have top refinished and an over eager person sanded through the mahogany veneer, it's about an 1 1/2" in diameter in the middle of the top. I don't know how to fix it, any suggestions aside from stripping off and replacing the existing veneer which I probably will have to end up doing, a patch would stand out as the grain would not match.

The table is an antique, 12" x 24", to me it is an embarrassment to have something looking worse than when it came in, so maybe someone has a fix I could try?
Quote:
Originally Posted by Steve Neul View Post
It's not really a DIY project to re-veneer a dining room table. You would have to either have a veneer press or a vacuum bag big enough to fit the table. The peal and press veneer is terrible and applying veneer with contact cement is equally as bad. Then you would have to do the entire top including the leaves to have matching wood. You might stain the table dark and do a faux finish on the sand through.
Quote:
Originally Posted by GeorgeC View Post
It is only 12 inches by 24 inches. Still might be outside the capabilities of this poster since he did not post any infomation about the shops capabilities.


George

George has it right! Regardless of the size, it was fixed by overlaying some thinner strips.

The answer to your question will only be as detailed and specific as the question is detailed and specific. Good questions also include a sketch or a photo that illustrates your issue. (:< D)
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post #12 of 14 Old 08-17-2019, 06:52 AM Thread Starter
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Well actually no, I used solid mahogany wood to replace the top.



I do know how to veneer, but didn't have any 2' lg (I don't like butt joints with veneer), my only other option was to buy a 8' lg sheet of veneer.
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post #13 of 14 Old 08-17-2019, 08:23 PM
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Very nice veneer is available on line in many sizes. I usually let the customer pick out the veneer. I normally vacuum press. A process that can be easily jury rigged for the DIYr. 6 mil poly, duct tape & a shop vac can actually work fine. Time in the bag is actually quite short. I've got a 5 X 10' vacuum table and tapped in to the 40hp vacuum system for the CNC router. Works great, but for those W/O such things it is still doable. Veneering is fun.
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post #14 of 14 Old 08-17-2019, 09:11 PM
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Good on you Redeared for doing what you thought was right. Sounds like you have returned a better product than was received.

Does sound like a good time for the wood working group at have a discussion using this example. Determine skills and have certain folks tackle certain activities or have some one managing the tasks.
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