Mango wood dining set - Woodworking Talk - Woodworkers Forum
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post #1 of 14 Old 04-24-2018, 11:55 AM Thread Starter
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Mango wood dining set

Hi all! I'm new to woodworking/refinishing and was hoping to learn from the collective about selecting an appropriate finish. I purchased a mango wood dining set and want to change the color to something darker. The table/chairs/bench were previously treated with a lacquer coat that was topped with bowling wax. I plan to strip the current finish and was hoping to use either a darker lacquer or stain (if the wood will hold it) so that I can still see the grain through the finish, thus I'm not sure that removing the wax and topping the lacquer with a darker media would be ideal... being that they are going to see frequent use, something durable and water/stain resistant is a must.

Could any of you help to guide me in the right direction? I'm not averse to getting a sprayer if it can run on my home compressor, but I'm not sure how user friendly the various methods are for somebody new to the hobby/profession.

Thanks in advance!

~David
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post #2 of 14 Old 04-24-2018, 10:42 PM
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To prevent getting wax in the wood I would clean the furniture with a wax and grease remover before stripping it.

A lacquer finish would be fine for a dining room set. It's not completely waterproof so you need to take a little care to keep it dry. Occasionally leaving a sweaty glass on the finish won't hurt it but repeatedly setting one in the same spot will lift the finish.

You could stain the wood with an oil stain and finish with lacquer. It would be best to seal the wood and level the surface with a lacquer sanding sealer. Sanding sealer is a softer clear coat which makes sanding between coats easier. Think of it as a clear primer. Then when you get the finish looking good apply two coats of lacquer for the topcoat.

Lacquer is a finish that needs to be sprayed. You don't have to get a high dollar paint sprayer for wood finishes. I use a harbor freight #97855 sprayer.
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post #3 of 14 Old 04-24-2018, 10:54 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Steve Neul View Post
Lacquer is a finish that needs to be sprayed. You don't have to get a high dollar paint sprayer for wood finishes. I use a harbor freight #97855 sprayer.
I don't do much wood work, so I was thinking of just a can of Lacquer. Is this good enough? I tried brushing on the Water Bourne poly but the brush strokes are slightly visible.

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post #4 of 14 Old 04-25-2018, 07:03 AM
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I don't do much wood work, so I was thinking of just a can of Lacquer. Is this good enough? I tried brushing on the Water Bourne poly but the brush strokes are slightly visible.

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Bar Tops & Crafts
This clear wood finish brushing spray is 100-Percent nitrocellulose brushing lacquer for most interior wood and metal surfaces
Easy to application provide professional results
This crystal clear lacquer is non-yellowing
You could do everything but the top of the table with rattlecan lacquer.

When you spray a table top you need more volume of finish than the rattlecan can do. By the time you spray a row of finish from one side of the table to the other where you started is dry so when you do the next row it doesn't immediately melt together. Visually, think of spraying a table top like installing roofing shingles. You lay one row at a time overlaping the previous row. By the time you do the entire top you see every row of finish in the sheen. With a paint spayer you can lay a row of finish in a couple seconds so when you lay the next row it's barely started to dry so in effect by the time you do the entire top it looks like you sprayed the entire top with one stroke. You have to keep a wet edge in order to not have the finish streaked. I have not tried this but you might be able to get away with spraying a table top with rattlecan fast dry polyurethane. It's a slower drying finish.
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post #5 of 14 Old 04-25-2018, 09:26 AM Thread Starter
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Originally Posted by Steve Neul View Post
To prevent getting wax in the wood I would clean the furniture with a wax and grease remover before stripping it.
In my excitement to get started I already stripped the table top without using a wax/grease remover... what would it look like if wax got into the wood, and could it still be corrected with the wax and grease remover? I fear I may have already driven some of the wax into the wood, though I'm not at home at the moment to take photos to show.

Is there a specific wax and grease remover that you would recommend?

Quote:
Originally Posted by Steve Neul View Post
A lacquer finish would be fine for a dining room set. It's not completely waterproof so you need to take a little care to keep it dry. Occasionally leaving a sweaty glass on the finish won't hurt it but repeatedly setting one in the same spot will lift the finish.

Lacquer is a finish that needs to be sprayed. You don't have to get a high dollar paint sprayer for wood finishes. I use a harbor freight #97855 sprayer.
I'm not married to using lacquer, but was more mentioning it in passing. Is there a better finish I should be considering for this application? Does lacquer require regular care/maintenance I should be aware of?

Thank you for your insight!

Last edited by dswads34; 04-25-2018 at 09:43 AM.
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post #6 of 14 Old 04-25-2018, 07:49 PM
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Originally Posted by dswads34 View Post
In my excitement to get started I already stripped the table top without using a wax/grease remover... what would it look like if wax got into the wood, and could it still be corrected with the wax and grease remover? I fear I may have already driven some of the wax into the wood, though I'm not at home at the moment to take photos to show.

Is there a specific wax and grease remover that you would recommend?



I'm not married to using lacquer, but was more mentioning it in passing. Is there a better finish I should be considering for this application? Does lacquer require regular care/maintenance I should be aware of?

Thank you for your insight!
Any wax and grease remover available at auto supply stores would work fine. I started in my career using Dupont Prepsol Solvent so it's about the only one I have experience with.

The wood wouldn't look any different after being stripped if wax was present. It's just sometimes waxes and polishes especially aerosol polishes cause problems with the new finish so I was recommending cleaning the wax off prior to stripping it. Don't worry about it, if a problem develops there is solutions. If anything unusual happens when you start applying the new finish stop where you are and show us what is happening.

I really like working with lacquer. It dries so fast you can finish a project from start to finish in a couple of hours. Since it dries so fast if something goes wrong it's easier to fix. A run on varnish you might have to let it dry a week before it's hard enough to deal with. Lacquer you could take a razor blade and shave it off in about an hour. It's well worth getting the equipment just to save you a lot of finishing headaches.

If I didn't work with lacquer I would probably use fast dry polyurethane. It may take a half day for a coat to dry in warm weather but you would be able to brush it. The mistake most people make when brushing a finish is they brush it too much. The more you brush a finish causes it to get too much air in the finish and makes it set up too fast. The brush makes a texture in the finish and if you apply it and get off of it the finish is usually wet enough it flows together eliminating most of the brush marks. It also takes a soft brush and apply the finish as thin as you can. If you miss a spot leave it until it drys and go back and touch it up. If you go back the finish is already thickened and when you touch it up the brush drags in the half dried finish and makes a nasty brush mark.
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post #7 of 14 Old 07-24-2018, 02:05 PM Thread Starter
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Update to my project: It is going VERY slowly as I have very limited free time, but so far I have stripped, sanded and stained the table and bench and started finishing them w/ GF Enduro-Var. It dries fairly smooth, however I want to avoid brush marks in the final coat and this stuff dries very quickly in my environment (recently 90+ degree days in dry Colorado climate). I was toying w/ the idea of thinning it, but in the interest of avoiding runs haven't done this yet. The short dry time also makes it challenging to keep a wet edge on something as large as a table top.

I'm using Satin Enduro-var, so glossy isn't the end goal- just no brush marks. Is sanding between coats the best way to achieve this, possibly w/ a very fine sand and/or polish after the top coat has completely cured? Or do I need to reconsider getting a spray gun to finish the job? After having the project in my garage as long as it has been, I'll do what I have to in order to get it right.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Steve Neul View Post
...You don't have to get a high dollar paint sprayer for wood finishes. I use a harbor freight #97855 sprayer.
My home air compressor is a relatively small setup, thus based on the stats I'm reading about the HarborFreight #97855, it appears that I don't have enough CFM to use this gun. See my air compressor here https://www.homedepot.com/p/Husky-4-...041H/206492568. Would this gun still work at a lower pressure, or should I be looking at alternate methods?

Thanks again everybody for your help! I've been reading up and learning a lot, but all of this information can be a bit overwhelming to someone with little to no baseline knowledge.
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post #8 of 14 Old 08-10-2018, 06:29 PM Thread Starter
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Any idea what’s causing this or how to fix it? I stained the table with an oil-based wiping stain, let it dry a few days and topped with GF enduro-var. The first time I finished it, the seal coat actually raised prior damage out of the wood to where a light scuff with sandpaper actually sanded through the stain. This seems to be what it is doing again, but with not a damaged area this time... the stain was a fairly consistent color prior to applying enduro-var.

Thoughts? I’m not really keen on sanding and starting from scratch a third time if I can help it. Maybe a stain pen and seal over the top of it, or is this faux pas?
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post #9 of 14 Old 08-10-2018, 06:45 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by dswads34 View Post
Update to my project: It is going VERY slowly as I have very limited free time, but so far I have stripped, sanded and stained the table and bench and started finishing them w/ GF Enduro-Var. It dries fairly smooth, however I want to avoid brush marks in the final coat and this stuff dries very quickly in my environment (recently 90+ degree days in dry Colorado climate). I was toying w/ the idea of thinning it, but in the interest of avoiding runs haven't done this yet. The short dry time also makes it challenging to keep a wet edge on something as large as a table top.

I'm using Satin Enduro-var, so glossy isn't the end goal- just no brush marks. Is sanding between coats the best way to achieve this, possibly w/ a very fine sand and/or polish after the top coat has completely cured? Or do I need to reconsider getting a spray gun to finish the job? After having the project in my garage as long as it has been, I'll do what I have to in order to get it right.



My home air compressor is a relatively small setup, thus based on the stats I'm reading about the HarborFreight #97855, it appears that I don't have enough CFM to use this gun. See my air compressor here https://www.homedepot.com/p/Husky-4-...041H/206492568. Would this gun still work at a lower pressure, or should I be looking at alternate methods?

Thanks again everybody for your help! I've been reading up and learning a lot, but all of this information can be a bit overwhelming to someone with little to no baseline knowledge.
If your compressor is too small you could use the sprayer for the chairs but you would never be able to spray the table top. When doing a table top you can't start and stop you have to continuously spray the top from one end to the other. Now if the table opens up for a leaf you would just need enough air to do one section at a time but I don't think the husky is enough for even half.
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post #10 of 14 Old 08-10-2018, 09:35 PM Thread Starter
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thanks Steve! Any thoughts on the blemishes in the finish (pictures attached above)?
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post #11 of 14 Old 08-10-2018, 10:00 PM
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When you applied the stain - did you wipe it on, wait a minute or two, then wipe off all the excess with a clean rag/paper towel?

Or did you apply stain, leaving a wet coat, then let that dry for a few days?

Redefining normal daily

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post #12 of 14 Old 08-10-2018, 10:02 PM
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When you applied stain, did you wipe it on, wait a minute or two, then use clean rags/paper towels to wipe off all the excess stain?

Or did you apply a wet coat of stain, then let it dry for a few days?

Redefining normal daily

Redefining normal daily.
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post #13 of 14 Old 08-10-2018, 10:22 PM Thread Starter
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When you applied stain, did you wipe it on, wait a minute or two, then use clean rags/paper towels to wipe off all the excess stain?

Or did you apply a wet coat of stain, then let it dry for a few days?

Redefining normal daily
I applied stain and then removed it after a few minutes, rotating through to clean rags as they became saturated/dirty. I could run my hand smoothly over the surface without getting stain or any sticking after I was done. After that, I let it dry for a few days with the hope of avoiding issues w/ applying water based enduro-var on top of oil-based stain.
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post #14 of 14 Old 08-10-2018, 11:20 PM
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I applied stain and then removed it after a few minutes, rotating through to clean rags as they became saturated/dirty. I could run my hand smoothly over the surface without getting stain or any sticking after I was done. After that, I let it dry for a few days with the hope of avoiding issues w/ applying water based enduro-var on top of oil-based stain.
The blemishes are probably due to a chemical reaction between the linseed oil in the stain and the water based finish. Linseed oil has to be completely dry when you use a waterborne finish over the top. Depending on the stain and the weather there that might take as much as a week. Unfortunately the only fix is to strip the finish off and start over.
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