The finishing process I follow for my furniture - Woodworking Talk - Woodworkers Forum
 
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post #1 of 9 Old 12-16-2008, 09:12 AM Thread Starter
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The finishing process I follow for my furniture

Hello guys,

Iíd want your opinion/feedback/comments about the finishing process I follow when Iím about to finish my projects. I like to work with lacquer because itís simple, fast and easy to work with and it dries really fast. Please let me know if Iím missing a step or if itís too much for a piece of furniture.
  • Sand the project completely up to 220.
  • 2 coats of a washcoat with one part thinner-one part sanding sealer sprayed. This is just to have an even surface when you apply stain.
  • 1 coat of oil stain with a brush or rag, wipe off the excess and let it dry.
  • 1 coat of the sanding sealer mix I used for the washcoat, just to seal the stain and pores and let it dry for 30 min.
  • Sand it completely with 400 grit
  • then to the same mix I used for washcoating and the first coat after stain, I add a little stain (the same oil stain I used for the first coat) and mix it completely (Iíll act as a pre-toner), I go ahead and give another coat now with a spray system.
  • Sand it completely with 400 grit
  • Another coat of the sanding sealer/thinner/oil stain mix
  • Sand it completely with 400 grit and now itís ready for the lacquer, here I make another mix with 1/3 lacquer, 1/3 thinner, 1/6 retarder and 1/6 oil stain.
  • 2 or 3 coats with this mix, sand between coats with 400 or 600 grit and should be ready to go.

I'm skiping the polishing process, I'll post it in the future. I like to use a spray system for finishing my projects, actually Iíve got a PSH1 Porter Cable spray gun with a 5 gallon compressor and works great, it gives a great finish to the furniture, itís easier and faster to work with.

Iíll appreciate any comments/feedback you have for this process.

Thanks.
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post #2 of 9 Old 12-16-2008, 09:58 AM
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If you are happy with it, then your process should be fine.
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post #3 of 9 Old 12-16-2008, 10:40 AM
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What type of sanding sealer ?.

Jerry
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post #4 of 9 Old 12-16-2008, 10:47 AM
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WOW!!!

That is a lot of work. Does it give you a very deep appearance to the finish?

I guess I am just lazy. I usually sand with 150, sometines 150, stain to desired color, sand again and then lacquer many coats.

G
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post #5 of 9 Old 12-16-2008, 11:00 AM Thread Starter
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Jerry: There are many different products out there, the one I use is from Minwax, you can get it at HD or Lowes.
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post #6 of 9 Old 12-16-2008, 11:16 AM Thread Starter
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Quote:
Originally Posted by GeorgeC View Post
WOW!!!

That is a lot of work. Does it give you a very deep appearance to the finish?

I guess I am just lazy. I usually sand with 150, sometines 150, stain to desired color, sand again and then lacquer many coats.

G
Hi George,

I've never realized how deep the color is once I started to use this process, I used to stain and seal it by hand but once you apply a second coat of stain an wipe off the excess, you may dissolve or remove your previous coat of stain, you have to be careful with it, but now with this process, you're applying a really thin coat of stain mixed with lacquer or sanding sealer at a time, giving your furniture a deep look and a nice and even color, and you don't need to wipe off anything, you're sealing and staining your work at the same time, it looks really good, more professional finish and a good protection to your work.

You might say that's alot of work but you decide how professional your work is, it's up to you.
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post #7 of 9 Old 12-16-2008, 11:24 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by elpatitoplus View Post
You might say that's alot of work but you decide how professional your work is, it's up to you.
There are many ways to get a professional looking finish. Your's is just one of them.
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post #8 of 9 Old 12-17-2008, 07:43 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by bradnailer View Post
There are many ways to get a professional looking finish. Your's is just one of them.

This is absolutely true. We're just reading the OP's method, without seeing the results of that method. My comment on the OP's method is that the finishing schedule may depend on the wood/plywood specie and type, and the ultimate look that is desired. Sanding a stained application, or adding stain to sealer or finish might be a decision made under certain conditions, but not in what I consider a regular finishing schedule.






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post #9 of 9 Old 12-17-2008, 11:33 AM Thread Starter
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[quote=cabinetman;55368]This is absolutely true. We're just reading the OP's method, without seeing the results of that method. My comment on the OP's method is that the finishing schedule may depend on the wood/plywood specie and type, and the ultimate look that is desired. Sanding a stained application, or adding stain to sealer or finish might be a decision made under certain conditions, but not in what I consider a regular finishing schedule.

I agree cabinetman, I don't always use this method when I finish a project, sometimes it's not necessary to apply too many coats on it, and some others just one coat of stain and lacquer and you're done, but for example when you work with pine or maple, it's necessary to pre-seal the wood in order to have an even color on the project, it's where I use this method, It's given me great results and once you try you'll see the results.
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