Finishing Cocobolo - Woodworking Talk - Woodworkers Forum
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
post #1 of 5 Old 08-27-2014, 12:33 PM Thread Starter
Junior Member
 
Join Date: Dec 2012
Posts: 2
View lmelton's Photo Album My Photos
Finishing Cocobolo

I make custom handles for knives. *I love working with cocobolo, and I tend to put it on most of my knives. *It is a rich colored, dense hardwood, that has a natural oily finish which works well in the kitchen, or any enviroment where the knife can get wet.

At first I did not apply a finish as the natural oils prevent most finishes from adhering. *However, I have been experimenting to see if I can improve by using an oil finish, such as the one Liberon makes. *I read where a sealer should be applied before the oil finish, and shellac or lacquer is recommended.

I'm not familiar with how this would work, but I'm told to put a coat of lacquer on first, and then applied the oil finish afterward. *This seems backwards to me, as I thought the lacquer would form a coating that the oil would not penetrate. *I thought the purpose of the oil was to fill the pores of the wood, making it resistant to liquids.

I've also been told not to use any type of finish on cocobolo, because the natural oils served the same purpose.

Any thoughts, comments, or suggestions?
lmelton is offline  
Sponsored Links
Advertisement
 
post #2 of 5 Old 08-27-2014, 12:59 PM
Senior Member
 
RandyReed's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2014
Posts: 1,311
View RandyReed's Photo Album My Photos
Most of the exotic woods have a certain amount of oil in them. In the production world, we always seal the wood with lacquer. Lacquer usually doesnt have any problem curing on "natural oily" species.

For the DIY'er, use a dewaxed shellac to seal in the natural oils.
RandyReed is offline  
post #3 of 5 Old 08-27-2014, 08:08 PM
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Sep 2011
Posts: 25,995
View Steve Neul's Photo Album My Photos
Quote:
Originally Posted by lmelton View Post
I make custom handles for knives. *I love working with cocobolo, and I tend to put it on most of my knives. *It is a rich colored, dense hardwood, that has a natural oily finish which works well in the kitchen, or any enviroment where the knife can get wet.

At first I did not apply a finish as the natural oils prevent most finishes from adhering. *However, I have been experimenting to see if I can improve by using an oil finish, such as the one Liberon makes. *I read where a sealer should be applied before the oil finish, and shellac or lacquer is recommended.

I'm not familiar with how this would work, but I'm told to put a coat of lacquer on first, and then applied the oil finish afterward. *This seems backwards to me, as I thought the lacquer would form a coating that the oil would not penetrate. *I thought the purpose of the oil was to fill the pores of the wood, making it resistant to liquids.

I've also been told not to use any type of finish on cocobolo, because the natural oils served the same purpose.

Any thoughts, comments, or suggestions?
Actually shellac is a good sealer for oily wood. In the old days when painters finished knotty pine a lot they used shellac on the knots so their varnish would adhere better. The best thing you could do putting a film finish over cocobolo is after sanding wash the wood down with acetone to remove as much of the natural wood as possible and then seal the wood with Zinsser Sealcoat. Then you could use most any finish you desire.
Steve Neul is offline  
Sponsored Links
Advertisement
 
post #4 of 5 Old 08-27-2014, 10:00 PM
Senior Member
 
RandyReed's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2014
Posts: 1,311
View RandyReed's Photo Album My Photos
Word of caution.....after a coat or 2 of Zinsser Seal Coat (which is basically a de-waxed shellac) do not apply any Oil-Urethane topcoats as they are designed to soak into the wood for the polymerization to occur and the shellac sealer will prevent that from happening.......basically that topcoat will not dry!

Therefore I suggest to apply a barrier coat of dewaxed shellac followed by a poly or non-poly varnish. If you don't want to do that, simply apply a lacquer topcoat.

You can also reduce your lacquer topcoat with 10% acetone or MEK and help the drying process.....maybe even apply 2 coats, sand lightly with 240 or 320 grit in between coats.

Last edited by RandyReed; 08-27-2014 at 10:06 PM.
RandyReed is offline  
post #5 of 5 Old 08-28-2014, 05:48 PM
Senior Member
 
mmwood_1's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2007
Location: corvallis, Oregon
Posts: 1,213
View mmwood_1's Photo Album My Photos
I've worked with cocobolo and my preferred finish is to sand up to 600 grit, then wet sand with 600 grit using oil. I have used mineral oil in the past.
mmwood_1 is offline  
Reply

Quick Reply
Message:
Options

Register Now



In order to be able to post messages on the Woodworking Talk - Woodworkers Forum forums, you must first register.
Please enter your desired user name, your email address and other required details in the form below.

User Name:
Password
Please enter a password for your user account. Note that passwords are case-sensitive.

Password:


Confirm Password:
Email Address
Please enter a valid email address for yourself.

Email Address:
OR

Log-in










Thread Tools
Show Printable Version Show Printable Version
Email this Page Email this Page
Display Modes
Linear Mode Linear Mode



Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Finishing Cocobolo Theresa Gillaspie General Woodworking Discussion 1 06-25-2013 08:34 PM
Cocobolo Inc. Mad Turner Woodturning 0 01-04-2013 01:58 PM
Uh Oh. Need some advice about finishing cocobolo tymann09 Woodturning 5 03-28-2012 09:52 PM
6 Candle Centerpiece - finishing cocobolo Ledhead General Woodworking Discussion 4 11-10-2010 05:57 PM
Finishing Cocobolo Ledhead Woodturning 7 05-27-2010 01:00 AM

Posting Rules  
You may post new threads
You may post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off

 
For the best viewing experience please update your browser to Google Chrome