Coloring a Non-Veneer Surface - Woodworking Talk - Woodworkers Forum
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
post #1 of 10 Old 06-22-2019, 07:36 AM Thread Starter
GAF
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Nov 2012
Location: Ontario, Canada
Posts: 807
View GAF's Photo Album My Photos
Coloring a Non-Veneer Surface

I am refinishing a music stand that is not antique as far as I can tell. It also does not appear to be veneered at all. It looks like pressboard that has been factory sprayed to provide the wood grain effect.

The owner wants the top to be colored black. I am looking for some advice on how to proceed. A traditional strip, sand and stain will not work assuming this really is pressboard.

Any feedback would be appreciated.

Gary
Attached Thumbnails
Click image for larger version

Name:	Music Stand 1.jpg
Views:	11
Size:	420.5 KB
ID:	376553  

Click image for larger version

Name:	Music Stand 8.jpg
Views:	11
Size:	286.0 KB
ID:	376555  

GAF is offline  
Sponsored Links
Advertisement
 
post #2 of 10 Old 06-22-2019, 08:17 AM
Moderator
 
Steve Neul's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2011
Posts: 25,771
View Steve Neul's Photo Album My Photos
Some of that stuff is run through a machine and has a wood grain printed on it like a machine prints newspaper. Unless you have such a machine you can't really reproduce it. There is a means which a person can do a faux finish wood graning but that usually has a coarse wood grain pattern which looks more like yellow pine. You might google wood graining to find a video. It helps that what you are doing will be dark to black. The finished appearance will have two colors on it, dark and black. You start off by painting the table the dark color with a satin paint. Then you apply a black glaze and very lightly brush over the glaze with a soft bristled brush. It removes the glaze in streaks showing the dark color. Once you get it like you like it just let it sit and dry. Then put a clear finish over the top. You can even make a burl look to it by wadding up a newspaper and patting it. Just make sure you use an oil based glaze. If something goes wrong you can do it over and over until you get the look you want or wipe it off with mineral spirits and start over. The water based glaze will go from workable to dry in moments to where you have to strip and sand again.

This procedure is more art than science so be sure to practice the finish on some Masonite or something before the furniture. The base color you might have to go lighter or darker so there is a lot of tinkering to it.
Steve Neul is online now  
post #3 of 10 Old 06-22-2019, 12:27 PM Thread Starter
GAF
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Nov 2012
Location: Ontario, Canada
Posts: 807
View GAF's Photo Album My Photos
Quote:
Originally Posted by Steve Neul View Post
Some of that stuff is run through a machine and has a wood grain printed on it like a machine prints newspaper. Unless you have such a machine you can't really reproduce it. There is a means which a person can do a faux finish wood graning but that usually has a coarse wood grain pattern which looks more like yellow pine. You might google wood graining to find a video. It helps that what you are doing will be dark to black. The finished appearance will have two colors on it, dark and black. You start off by painting the table the dark color with a satin paint. Then you apply a black glaze and very lightly brush over the glaze with a soft bristled brush. It removes the glaze in streaks showing the dark color. Once you get it like you like it just let it sit and dry. Then put a clear finish over the top. You can even make a burl look to it by wadding up a newspaper and patting it. Just make sure you use an oil based glaze. If something goes wrong you can do it over and over until you get the look you want or wipe it off with mineral spirits and start over. The water based glaze will go from workable to dry in moments to where you have to strip and sand again.

This procedure is more art than science so be sure to practice the finish on some Masonite or something before the furniture. The base color you might have to go lighter or darker so there is a lot of tinkering to it.
Steve, wow this seems complex to me. Let me digest it a bit.

Gary
GAF is offline  
Sponsored Links
Advertisement
 
post #4 of 10 Old 06-22-2019, 02:38 PM
where's my table saw?
 
woodnthings's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2009
Location: SE, Michigan
Posts: 25,302
View woodnthings's Photo Album My Photos
The owner wants it black?

If black is the color the owner wants, don't bother stripping it. Just sand it with 180 to 220 and spray it with Satin Black from a rattle can or if you have a good spray gun use that. I wouldn't bother with "graining" it, since black will hide most of that effort. With some practice and the right spray tip on the rattle can, you can get a nice even finish. You will have to pay more for the good tip. It will have a fan pattern rather than round one.

The answer to your question will only be as detailed and specific as the question is detailed and specific. Good questions also include a sketch or a photo that illustrates your issue. (:< D)

Last edited by woodnthings; 06-22-2019 at 02:45 PM.
woodnthings is online now  
post #5 of 10 Old 06-22-2019, 02:53 PM
Moderator
 
Steve Neul's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2011
Posts: 25,771
View Steve Neul's Photo Album My Photos
Angry

Quote:
Originally Posted by GAF View Post
Steve, wow this seems complex to me. Let me digest it a bit.

Gary
The wood graining sounds worse than it really is. If you look at most wood it's two colors, the lighter background color and the darker streaks of the grain. The glaze is about like putting mayonnaise on a painted surface and brushing it to the point where it's streaked like the grain of the wood is. You just have to determine the colors you want to use and the darker you go the easier it will be.

I think you would enjoy doing it. It's something you could use in the future like if you had a piece of furniture you had a large spot of putty you could paint the putty the background color and use a glaze to simulate the grain to make the putty spot less noticeable.
Steve Neul is online now  
post #6 of 10 Old 06-23-2019, 07:32 AM Thread Starter
GAF
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Nov 2012
Location: Ontario, Canada
Posts: 807
View GAF's Photo Album My Photos
Quote:
Originally Posted by woodnthings View Post
If black is the color the owner wants, don't bother stripping it. Just sand it with 180 to 220 and spray it with Satin Black from a rattle can or if you have a good spray gun use that. I wouldn't bother with "graining" it, since black will hide most of that effort. With some practice and the right spray tip on the rattle can, you can get a nice even finish. You will have to pay more for the good tip. It will have a fan pattern rather than round one.
Shop Tips: Using Spray Paint Nozzle Tips - YouTube
This is an approach that I had not yet considered. The video is very helpful. I actually did this on a bathroom vanity years ago and the finish was pretty nice.

Thanks for the idea.

Gary
GAF is offline  
post #7 of 10 Old 06-23-2019, 07:34 AM Thread Starter
GAF
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Nov 2012
Location: Ontario, Canada
Posts: 807
View GAF's Photo Album My Photos
Quote:
Originally Posted by Steve Neul View Post
The wood graining sounds worse than it really is. If you look at most wood it's two colors, the lighter background color and the darker streaks of the grain. The glaze is about like putting mayonnaise on a painted surface and brushing it to the point where it's streaked like the grain of the wood is. You just have to determine the colors you want to use and the darker you go the easier it will be.

I think you would enjoy doing it. It's something you could use in the future like if you had a piece of furniture you had a large spot of putty you could paint the putty the background color and use a glaze to simulate the grain to make the putty spot less noticeable.
Steve, I am still intimidated by the apparent complexity of this solution although I like the fact that it does result in some "wood grain".

Thanks for the input.

Gary
GAF is offline  
post #8 of 10 Old 06-23-2019, 08:25 AM
Moderator
 
Steve Neul's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2011
Posts: 25,771
View Steve Neul's Photo Album My Photos
It's like this. I didn't have any glaze to work with so I mixed some artist oil paint. Would have been better if I had let the lighter color dry first but did this by painting the lighter color first and then going over it with straight black with a fan brush. I'm not exactly sure what look you are wanting. Perhaps the gray could have been darker. Like I said it's more art than science.
Attached Thumbnails
Click image for larger version

Name:	gaf1.JPG
Views:	7
Size:	89.2 KB
ID:	376585  

Click image for larger version

Name:	gaf2.JPG
Views:	8
Size:	91.7 KB
ID:	376587  

Steve Neul is online now  
post #9 of 10 Old 06-24-2019, 06:36 AM Thread Starter
GAF
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Nov 2012
Location: Ontario, Canada
Posts: 807
View GAF's Photo Album My Photos
Quote:
Originally Posted by Steve Neul View Post
It's like this. I didn't have any glaze to work with so I mixed some artist oil paint. Would have been better if I had let the lighter color dry first but did this by painting the lighter color first and then going over it with straight black with a fan brush. I'm not exactly sure what look you are wanting. Perhaps the gray could have been darker. Like I said it's more art than science.
Steve, you continue to surprise and impress me the level of detail that you provide. Thank you.

Gary
GAF is offline  
post #10 of 10 Old 06-24-2019, 07:41 AM
Moderator
 
Steve Neul's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2011
Posts: 25,771
View Steve Neul's Photo Album My Photos
Quote:
Originally Posted by GAF View Post
Steve, you continue to surprise and impress me the level of detail that you provide. Thank you.

Gary
It's just goes with furniture refinishing. Often a customer wants to fix up a piece but doesn't want to spend the money to have veneer replaced so that leaves you to making the best you can out of a patch. Whether it be a big spot of putty or a burn-in without some kind of graining it really sticks out like a sore thumb.
Steve Neul is online now  
Reply

Quick Reply
Message:
Options

Register Now



In order to be able to post messages on the Woodworking Talk - Woodworkers Forum forums, you must first register.
Please enter your desired user name, your email address and other required details in the form below.

User Name:
Password
Please enter a password for your user account. Note that passwords are case-sensitive.

Password:


Confirm Password:
Email Address
Please enter a valid email address for yourself.

Email Address:
OR

Log-in










Thread Tools
Show Printable Version Show Printable Version
Email this Page Email this Page
Display Modes
Linear Mode Linear Mode



Posting Rules  
You may post new threads
You may post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off

 
For the best viewing experience please update your browser to Google Chrome