Best Finish for spraying interior maple doors - Woodworking Talk - Woodworkers Forum
 
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post #1 of 5 Old 12-25-2015, 09:54 PM Thread Starter
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Best Finish for spraying interior maple doors

I purchased the purple Harbor Freight sprayer to try to spray some new maple mission style doors I will be installing in my entry way.

I added a pantry to the kitchen and used a water base polyurethane that I brushed on. It turned out less than perfect but not really bad. Was hoping to get better results the next time around.

Looking for advice on the type of finish that would be best to put on the doors. Trying to finish up some projects to put the house on the market as I need to move by July 13th 2016, due to a job transfer that has residency requirements.

All advice is welcome, thanks in advance.

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post #2 of 5 Old 12-25-2015, 11:43 PM
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If you are finishing the doors inside the house you better use a finish like shellac or lacquer that dries quick so you don't get overspray all over everything. If you are just using a clear finish you probably should use an acrylic finish anyway. Oil based finishes tend to yellow as they age and may not be suitable for light colored woods like maple. Even traditional lacquer finishes tend to yellow. They are known as a nitrocellulose lacquer. The type that would work for you would be a fully catalyzed or pre-catalyzed lacquer. Shellac also yellows. There is one known as super blond that would last a long time before yellowing. In any case it would be a lot easier to finish them somewhere else than inside the house.

One note about the sprayer, be sure to keep the finish out of the threads on the cap. The cap tends to quickly glue itself on.
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post #3 of 5 Old 12-26-2015, 08:53 AM Thread Starter
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Thanks for the reply, I do have a heated garage so I will be finishing the doors there.

The doors will be natural, no stain.

Which would be easier for someone just getting into spraying? Is this something I could pick up at a big box store (Menards/Homedepot) or would I need to go to Sherwin Williams, those are my options around here.

Do I need to thin the lacquer or add anything to it for spraying? How do I know when the material has the correct viscosity to spray, (HF purple gun with 1.4 tip). Does this vary by brand of lacquer and if so is the information for spraying on the can?

Sorry for all the questions, new to spraying and just trying to minimize my mistakes starting out. I did research other threads but still had questions and instead of bringing a dead thread back to life I thought I would start my own.

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post #4 of 5 Old 12-26-2015, 10:29 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by brokenknee View Post
Thanks for the reply, I do have a heated garage so I will be finishing the doors there.

The doors will be natural, no stain.

Which would be easier for someone just getting into spraying? Is this something I could pick up at a big box store (Menards/Homedepot) or would I need to go to Sherwin Williams, those are my options around here.

Do I need to thin the lacquer or add anything to it for spraying? How do I know when the material has the correct viscosity to spray, (HF purple gun with 1.4 tip). Does this vary by brand of lacquer and if so is the information for spraying on the can?

Sorry for all the questions, new to spraying and just trying to minimize my mistakes starting out. I did research other threads but still had questions and instead of bringing a dead thread back to life I thought I would start my own.
If you are spraying lacquer you won't be able to heat your garage because the stuff is highly flammable. With lacquer temperature isn't so important. You can spray it below freezing and while it takes longer to dry it will work fine. Actually once dry enough dust won't stick to it airflow over the finish will dry it faster than having the garage heated.

The type of lacquer sold by the box stores is a nitrocellulose lacquer. The cellulose for this finish is derived from cotton and prone to turn yellow as it ages. This may be a issue on light colored woods. You can get a pre-catalyzed lacquer at a real paint store like Sherwin Williams however depending on your store you may have to order it. They are usually primarily geared for house painting and Pre-catalyzed lacquer is more of a commercial item. Using pre-catalyzed lacquer I would recommend getting a vinyl sealer to seal the wood with prior to topcoating. One note, pre-cat lacquer has a shelf life usually six months. It comes with a hardener in it. If you think you won't be able to use a gallon in this time frame you might get a fully catalyzed lacquer. This product comes without the hardener mixed in. You mix it as you use it. The only problem is any left over can't be saved. Once mixed you usually have 24 hours to use it before it goes bad. Since it has a better hardener it makes a harder more durable finish.

The amount of thinning will vary from brand to brand and I haven't used Sherwin Williams Pre-catalyzed lacquer. Their nitrocellulose lacquer you can pour half the lacquer out of a gallon can and fill the can with lacquer thinner to where the bail goes into the can. At one time most all brands of lacquer you would thin it 100%. Now it varies from not thinning it at all to thinning about 25%. The best thing to do is tune the finish to your gun. Put some in your sprayer and try spraying it without thinning at all. If it sprays alright don't thin it. You will know if it needs thinning. It will either not spray or spray and leave a rough power residue next to where you are spraying. Thin the finish just enough to eliminate this residue. Over thinning can create as much problems as being too thick. Since it melts into the finish it makes each coat longer to dry and screws with the sheen of the finish.
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post #5 of 5 Old 12-26-2015, 03:36 PM Thread Starter
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Thank you, I will have to stop in at Sherwin Williams next time I am in town and see what they have. At least now I have some basic knowledge for when I am asking the questions.

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