Bed Finishing Concern - Woodworking Talk - Woodworkers Forum
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
post #1 of 6 Old 11-29-2012, 01:05 PM Thread Starter
Junior Member
 
Join Date: Nov 2012
Posts: 3
View Jayf19's Photo Album My Photos
Bed Finishing Concern

I've recently undertaken my very first woodworking project; I decided to do a Spruce King Sized bed frame for a memory foam mattress. Although Iím close to completion, I have a few concerns of my finished product. I apologize in advance for the long story but I would like to give a description of what I've done and the mistakes I've made and learned from throughout.

Alright, so I started by finding a plan, making sure the dimensions were correct and went to the local lumber store to buy some cheap but decent wood for a bed frame. I was suggested to go with Spruce, and from what I read, it was a reasonable and economical choice.

I got home, trimmed all the wood to the appropriate dimensions. Then I started sanding; since a lot of the wood was knotty and rough, I started with from a grit-40, to 60, to 100, to 150 (stopped there for slats and joists) and finally to 220 on the external ones exposed ones. At around 150 grit, I noticed that the knots weren't getting that much smoother, some still had holes and potential sheet ripping edges. A few Google searches showed me that I should have first applied some wood filling on the knots and rougher areas.

And so I went back to the store, bought some wood filling and filled all the gaps and problematic areas. Sanded back all these spots from starting with 100 grit, to 150 and 220 as was mentioned before. The job looks ok, but had I started with the wood filler from the start, the patches would have looked a lot cleaner.

Next off, I cleaned everything to remove the dust particles (vacuumed, tack cloth, and finally some cheesecloth dipped in denatured alcohol). I pre-stained everything and applied a nice stain on everything.

My main concern at this point are the ______ (I have no clue what is the proper term to describe this, so please see the attached picture) which will most likely rip off my bedding sheets or even the mattress. I tried sanding these things but I just seem to be digging in the wood without removing. I tried ripping them off, to quickly learn that they take away much bigger portions of the wood. I tried cutting them from the opposite direction, to no avail. I tried adding some wood filling with a light sanding, which has worked a bit on some of them, but on some others it hasn't.

So where should I go from there? As you can see in picture 2, the stain has revealed that some slats still have these ______.

Are there any quick fixes to this issue?
Would a polyurethane finish or a wax seal them?
How do I avoid this problem in the first place?

Thanks!
Attached Thumbnails
Click image for larger version

Name:	photo (1).jpg
Views:	88
Size:	54.4 KB
ID:	56007  

Click image for larger version

Name:	photo (3).jpg
Views:	91
Size:	44.3 KB
ID:	56008  

Click image for larger version

Name:	photo (2).jpg
Views:	87
Size:	60.4 KB
ID:	56009  

Click image for larger version

Name:	photo.jpg
Views:	89
Size:	82.0 KB
ID:	56010  

Jayf19 is offline  
Sponsored Links
Advertisement
 
post #2 of 6 Old 11-29-2012, 05:18 PM
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Sep 2011
Posts: 26,176
View Steve Neul's Photo Album My Photos
The first picture and maybe the second with the loose chip, I would work wood glue under it and clamp it down. After it's dry then use wood putty around it and thoroughly sand it. The third and fourth picture just looks like bad boards. I would replace them if possible.

A polyurethane won't help with splintered wood. Don't put any wax on it for a month after your done with the finish.

Some of the spots may be due to machining it against the grain but the last picture the board was defective to begin with. The only thing you can do when building something is to keep your eyes out for bad spots like that. Sometimes you just have to replace parts that didn't machine well and sometimes you have to cut around defective spots in a board.
Steve Neul is online now  
post #3 of 6 Old 11-30-2012, 01:33 PM Thread Starter
Junior Member
 
Join Date: Nov 2012
Posts: 3
View Jayf19's Photo Album My Photos
Quote:
Originally Posted by Steve Neul View Post
The first picture and maybe the second with the loose chip, I would work wood glue under it and clamp it down. After it's dry then use wood putty around it and thoroughly sand it. The third and fourth picture just looks like bad boards. I would replace them if possible.

A polyurethane won't help with splintered wood. Don't put any wax on it for a month after your done with the finish.

Some of the spots may be due to machining it against the grain but the last picture the board was defective to begin with. The only thing you can do when building something is to keep your eyes out for bad spots like that. Sometimes you just have to replace parts that didn't machine well and sometimes you have to cut around defective spots in a board.
Thanks for your answer.

So basically, at this point, there's not really a quick fix for that type of problem; considering all my pieces have been stained?

Most of the "chipping wood" on my project are really small chips, which have a slight movement when pressed on (ie: when I was applying the stain). For the most part, I was able to clean them with cheesecloth without getting caught in anything.... Even a varnish wouldn't help sealing these imperfections? Should I be worried for my sheets?
Jayf19 is offline  
Sponsored Links
Advertisement
 
post #4 of 6 Old 11-30-2012, 03:52 PM
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Sep 2011
Posts: 26,176
View Steve Neul's Photo Album My Photos
Having it stained shouldn't be too much of a problem. Since the stain is dry it shouldn't gum up the sandpaper that much. After another look you might be able to sand out the fuzz on the board in the third picture. The fourth picture looks like the wood was splintered when it was still in the tree. As best as I can tell the split goes half way through it. In addition the mineral stain around it may be a eyesore even if you were able to glue it together. Sometimes when you build something you find defects and when you start patching it, it appears to be fine and in six months the crack opens back up again. By then it's a major fix to replace the part. It kind of when in doubt through it out thing. I think it will be easiest on you to replace the part now while you are building the bed and know which stain you used on it.
Steve Neul is online now  
post #5 of 6 Old 11-30-2012, 04:50 PM
Old School
 
cabinetman's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2007
Location: So. Florida
Posts: 24,027
View cabinetman's Photo Album My Photos
A lot of what's loose can be glued back in and then sanded out. The wood you started with isn't really the best for furniture. You might look at the stock more closely when purchasing it. From what I see, the wood needs a whole lot more sanding.

You could use an oil base stain, but I wouldn't use an oil base topcoat, as it will stink for a long time. Adding "varnish" will not take care of the imperfections. I would use a waterbase polyurethane. It dries very fast, stays clear, doesn't smell up the area, and cleans up with water.





.
cabinetman is offline  
post #6 of 6 Old 12-01-2012, 09:11 AM Thread Starter
Junior Member
 
Join Date: Nov 2012
Posts: 3
View Jayf19's Photo Album My Photos
Quote:
Originally Posted by cabinetman View Post
A lot of what's loose can be glued back in and then sanded out. The wood you started with isn't really the best for furniture. You might look at the stock more closely when purchasing it. From what I see, the wood needs a whole lot more sanding.

You could use an oil base stain, but I wouldn't use an oil base topcoat, as it will stink for a long time. Adding "varnish" will not take care of the imperfections. I would use a waterbase polyurethane. It dries very fast, stays clear, doesn't smell up the area, and cleans up with water.





.
And I was afraid to be over-sanding

Thanks for the replies
Jayf19 is offline  
Reply

Quick Reply
Message:
Options

Register Now



In order to be able to post messages on the Woodworking Talk - Woodworkers Forum forums, you must first register.
Please enter your desired user name, your email address and other required details in the form below.

User Name:
Password
Please enter a password for your user account. Note that passwords are case-sensitive.

Password:


Confirm Password:
Email Address
Please enter a valid email address for yourself.

Email Address:
OR

Log-in










Thread Tools
Show Printable Version Show Printable Version
Email this Page Email this Page
Display Modes
Linear Mode Linear Mode



Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
A concern of safety. Calzone General Woodworking Discussion 33 10-04-2012 11:09 PM
Grex tool concern Wannabewoodworker Power Tools & Machinery 9 04-09-2012 06:59 PM
Vise Question/Concern Dr.D General Woodworking Discussion 1 10-16-2009 05:33 PM
May sound silly, but it's a concern... redticket General Woodworking Discussion 6 10-09-2008 10:46 PM
Concern on new Workbench DOLFAN Design & Plans 2 01-28-2008 04:16 PM

Posting Rules  
You may post new threads
You may post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off

 
For the best viewing experience please update your browser to Google Chrome