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post #1 of 8 Old 03-18-2011, 02:35 AM Thread Starter
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accentuating grain and everything question.

hello all, first post here. I have read through the related topics on this forum already and have not found an answer yet so here is my dilemma...

a few years ago I have seen a rifle at the remington gun factory with a wood stock that had crazy accentuated grain in black, like almost black and light grey. something like this but more intense...

I want to know how I can accentuate wood grain to this degree.

I have read about using rit dyes, and penetrating stains and sanding.

I have built a book case out of pine pieces (bits glued together) and have sanded it smooth, ready for finishing. I would like to know what is the best way to accetuate the grain in pine(high contrast) regardless of any blotchiness that may occur.

I should mention that I am a very "fresh' ameteur woodworker and have only started maybe 5 years ago making coffee tables, fish tank stands, bookcases, bed frames. Every time that I have done a project I have tried a different finishing technique.
here is a tank hood that I have made in my first attempt at high contrast grain...
oil based ebony stain on pine with oil based poly

here is the last stand I made, solid pine oil based ebony stain, sanded lightly and water based poly finish.

here is the same stand with another tank canopy on top I sprayed the stain with an airbrush and wiped it off quickly, repeated this twice.


I want to bring everything out, and I am under the impression that pre-stains may prevent some things to pop out.

thank you in advance for any tips and suggestions, I will be checking for updates daily, feel free to ask any questions.
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post #2 of 8 Old 03-18-2011, 02:45 AM
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I like the looks of that finish. I'm sure you'll get a lot of comments that you must use a certain Brand, or type of finish. I always say, experiment on scrap pieces till you get the look YOU want.

When I was a kid, I finished a pine piece using used motor oil and gasoline mixture. I thought it was going to stink to holy hell, but it didn't. Got a lot of compliments on that finish, never did tell anyone what I used.

Be creative!

Harrison, at your service!
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post #3 of 8 Old 03-18-2011, 03:38 AM Thread Starter
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thats interesting. can you put poly over motoroil finish?
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post #4 of 8 Old 03-18-2011, 09:00 AM
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There are a few things you could try. One is very simple. Take one of the DIY propane or MAPP torches and lightly pass the wood to create a darkening. You can vary the intensity by how close to the flame, and how slow you move the flame. This may also give a high and low relief to the grain as the softer wood burns slightly away. Just be careful with starting a fire, and having any flammables nearby. Be ready to put out a fire.


You can use a dye powder that the ratio can be changed easily and use quick on and off with a rag. This will work with oil stains as well. If you sand the wood smooth to 400x - 600x, the hard and soft grain will take the stain differently, with leaving very light and very dark grain lines.








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post #5 of 8 Old 03-18-2011, 08:08 PM Thread Starter
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Quote:
Originally Posted by cabinetman View Post


There are a few things you could try. One is very simple. Take one of the DIY propane or MAPP torches and lightly pass the wood to create a darkening. You can vary the intensity by how close to the flame, and how slow you move the flame. This may also give a high and low relief to the grain as the softer wood burns slightly away. Just be careful with starting a fire, and having any flammables nearby. Be ready to put out a fire.


You can use a dye powder that the ratio can be changed easily and use quick on and off with a rag. This will work with oil stains as well. If you sand the wood smooth to 400x - 600x, the hard and soft grain will take the stain differently, with leaving very light and very dark grain lines.








.
thank you! this is exactly what I was looking for, I have a few smaller projects that are still bare wood. I'm really looking forward to trying the burning technique. Is there are term used to describe that technique or is it just burning?
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post #6 of 8 Old 03-27-2011, 05:05 PM
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I am pretty new to woodworking, and have been reading and watching as many videos as I can. I was watching a video on you tube the other day and a guy did exactly what your talking about with shoe polish. He had a ash wood plate he had turned and rubbed it down with black shoe polish let it soak in a few minuetes and then turned on the lathe and polished it with a rag. He said it was basically the same as some product specific to woodworking, but shoe polish had way more color options and did the same thing. It would probably take more work to polish with out it being on the lathe, but you could probably use an angle grinder with a buffing pad. You might could do a search and find it on you tube. Anyhow never done it myself, but thought it might help you.
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post #7 of 8 Old 03-29-2011, 02:21 AM
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I am very new to this site and was reading your article about burning the grain and just wanted to share with you what it would look like.
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post #8 of 8 Old 04-01-2011, 04:15 PM
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Also, keep in mind that the rifle stock pictured is made out of laminated wood...
Much of that grain pattern is due to the different layers of wood being exposed as the shape is formed...

I've had better luck with flat-sawn softer woods to get some of that effect, and did, in fact, use shoe polish once before, trying to darken the wood...
It worked but was a pain sanding through to the look I was after.
Good luck and have fun with it.

p

...ever notice how "I'm sorry" and "I apologize" mean the same thing, unless you are at a funeral..?
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