Theory behind this accident *GRAPHIC* - Page 2 - Woodworking Talk - Woodworkers Forum
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post #21 of 35 Old 04-24-2019, 03:27 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by johnep View Post
If I had a table saw, I would buy a metal mesh butchers glove.
johnep
Not advised. You can lose your whole hand when the blade grabs the metal mesh and pulls the whole thing into the blade. IMHO, and being around heavy manufacturing for years, gloves have no place around moving or rotating machinery. I got a worse cut while making a salad- three stitches for $310. Should have gone to medical school.
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post #22 of 35 Old 04-24-2019, 03:36 PM
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Anyone that cuts freehand on a table saw is looking for trouble, any suggestion to do it is not the responsible thing to do.

This is not one of those debatable topics where my way is better than yours and open for discussion by good little boys.
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post #23 of 35 Old 04-24-2019, 04:25 PM
where's my table saw?
 
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Yes, but ......^

There are just some occasions where there is no other way, no other tool. I can remember the "one" time where the cut was about 48" long on a triangle shaped piece of Melamine. The was no edge to register against the fence since the cut was not parallel to any edge. I cut slowly and carefully, allowing the saw blade to be free within the kerf so it would not jam. The blade had enough set to the teeth that the kerf was wider. Yes, it was intimidating, but it went well and I was glad when I was finished.

The answer to your question will only be as detailed and specific as the question is detailed and specific. Good questions also include a sketch or a photo that illustrates your issue. (:< D)
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post #24 of 35 Old 04-24-2019, 04:34 PM
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^^ YES, and

It's worth it for the adrenaline, but not for the cortisol. Another common freehand is trimming to a scribe, or ripping a taper, or grabbing a hand full of rippings to crosscut into kindling, or one-off cuts that don't need to be exact. Table saws are one of the safer tools.

Kerouac, J.
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post #25 of 35 Old 04-24-2019, 06:25 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by unburled View Post
Table saws are one of the safer tools.
Not when you violate almost every safety rule in the book about using table saws. You are lucky that you weren't using a 3 or 5 hp saw, but then at least you wouldn't be working at floor level. You need to go back to table saw 1101 and start over. You have done almost everything wrong, and you are very lucky that your injury was as slight as it is.

Some of the rest of you need to take a table saw 101 refresher for some of the suggestions made. I'm 77 and have used table saws almost daily since I was 12 and began at 8 with no kick backs and no blade contact injuries. Learn to operate it safely or the next time you won't be as lucky.

Charley
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post #26 of 35 Old 04-24-2019, 06:27 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by woodnthings View Post
There are just some occasions where there is no other way, no other tool. I can remember the "one" time where the cut was about 48" long on a triangle shaped piece of Melamine. The was no edge to register against the fence since the cut was not parallel to any edge. I cut slowly and carefully, allowing the saw blade to be free within the kerf so it would not jam. The blade had enough set to the teeth that the kerf was wider. Yes, it was intimidating, but it went well and I was glad when I was finished.
You don't own a circular saw, jigsaw, or a hand saw, there were many other ways of doing it, you choose a way that was unsafe and put yourself at risk, and now you are advising others to do that as well because you have decided they have no other choice.

Come on guys, show a little responsibility for what you are posting.

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post #27 of 35 Old 04-24-2019, 07:32 PM
where's my table saw?
 
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Advising others? ...... that's a stretch!

Quote:
Originally Posted by FrankC View Post
You don't own a circular saw, jigsaw, or a hand saw, there were many other ways of doing it, you choose a way that was unsafe and put yourself at risk, and now you are advising others to do that as well because you have decided they have no other choice.

Come on guys, show a little responsibility for what you are posting.

No one is "advising others" here. We are just saying it is done, has been done and the circumstances under which that happened and in my example, one time that I can recall. The safety police will always object to anything with risk involved. The worst thing that could have happened to me was a kick back and that's why I explained about the large size of the piece, the feed rate and the blade's tooth set, which minimized that potential. You/we can preach and pray all you/we wish, but you/we have no control over what others will do .... just saying. I'm not advising, just explaining.


I suppose I should have stated that in bold print at the bottom?

The answer to your question will only be as detailed and specific as the question is detailed and specific. Good questions also include a sketch or a photo that illustrates your issue. (:< D)

Last edited by woodnthings; 04-24-2019 at 07:47 PM.
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post #28 of 35 Old 04-24-2019, 10:31 PM
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3 people died in 2017 in the US making wooden kitchen cabinets, NAICS code 33711.
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post #29 of 35 Old 04-25-2019, 06:34 AM
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OK I agree re a metal glove, However, they are made of a fine mesh so should be somewhat hard for a fine tooth saw blade to get hold of. Probably best is to get a saw stop.
However would prevent cuts when using a chisel or sharp knife.
It is up to the individual to decide for themselves with advice. Have a look at the "damage" thread.
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post #30 of 35 Old 04-25-2019, 07:49 AM
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It doesn't matter how much experience a person has or how good they are occasionally something is going to blow up in your face. The trick is to always be prepared for it and respond to it. I was taught that if something goes wrong don't fight with the machine and just reach for the sky. You might get hit with a piece of wood but that is usually just a bruise. In time with experience you know instinctively which way the wood is going to go in the event of a kick back so you just don't ever put your hands in that path where it will be carried into the blade. You also keep your hands free so when it happens you can get away from it.
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post #31 of 35 Old 04-25-2019, 10:51 AM
where's my table saw?
 
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Really?

Quote:
Originally Posted by unburled View Post
3 people died in 2017 in the US making wooden kitchen cabinets, NAICS code 33711.

I don't think I was one of them, fortunately.

The answer to your question will only be as detailed and specific as the question is detailed and specific. Good questions also include a sketch or a photo that illustrates your issue. (:< D)
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post #32 of 35 Old 04-25-2019, 11:07 AM
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yes

Yes, according Bureau of Labor Statistics, but having been released under the Trump administration, that could be an alternative fact you know.
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post #33 of 35 Old 04-26-2019, 12:11 AM Thread Starter
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Quote:
Originally Posted by CharleyL View Post
Not when you violate almost every safety rule in the book about using table saws. You are lucky that you weren't using a 3 or 5 hp saw, but then at least you wouldn't be working at floor level. You need to go back to table saw 1101 and start over. You have done almost everything wrong, and you are very lucky that your injury was as slight as it is.

Some of the rest of you need to take a table saw 101 refresher for some of the suggestions made. I'm 77 and have used table saws almost daily since I was 12 and began at 8 with no kick backs and no blade contact injuries. Learn to operate it safely or the next time you won't be as lucky.

Charley
That was not OP. BTW.
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post #34 of 35 Old 04-26-2019, 01:38 AM
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Sorry, but a hand saw and a bench vise would have avoided all of this...in my shop, it would have been faster and safer....

Pick the safest tool for the job at hand. Just because you have a table saw doesn't mean you should use it for every cut...

I am glad that you have learned from your mistake. Please don't do it again...

Eric
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Ain't technology grand........when it works.
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post #35 of 35 Old 04-26-2019, 01:39 AM
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Just because you are not injured when you do something does not make it safe.

I read a lot of shockingly bad advice in this thread.

I hope that @nckheinrich takes the time to thoroughly study and internalize the basics of table saw safety, plus the same for any other power tools he/she may own. The truth is that nearly everyone who posted in this thread would benefit from it, and I do not exclude myself.
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