Tablesaw chucked a scrap piece my direction.... - Woodworking Talk - Woodworkers Forum
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post #1 of 39 Old 08-14-2015, 10:14 PM Thread Starter
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Tablesaw chucked a scrap piece my direction....

Luckily, it's only a couple smaller-ish cuts caused by the contact between the plywood cutoff and my finger & one knuckle. That could have been tons worse. I'll post pictures tomorrow, after the bleeding stops (and I can get my GF to take the pictures-- she's squeamish about blood...)

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post #2 of 39 Old 08-14-2015, 10:59 PM
where's my table saw?
 
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we know what it wasn't ....

It wasn't a closed kerf, pinched blade type of kickback.
Right?


It was probably a rotational one, where the piece rotated up and over the top of the blade and shot it back at you.
It will be interesting to hear how it happened, much more so than looking at your wounds..... just my opinion.

Also of interest would be if you have a splitter or riving knife on the saw. I feel much more confident using my saw with the splitter on than off since it does maintain the material against the fence and will prevent a rotational kickback. Don't ask me how I know this.
I've had more than few pieces come back at me, and most were plywood. Then I put the splitters back on and not a single kickback since.

The answer to your question will only be as detailed and specific as the question is detailed and specific. Good questions also include a sketch or a photo that illustrates your issue. (:< D)
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post #3 of 39 Old 08-14-2015, 11:28 PM Thread Starter
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You nailed it. Typically, I shut the saw off, and let it spin down before removing the scrap. Rotational spin doesn't even come CLOSE to describing how rapidly that piece flew at me.

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post #4 of 39 Old 08-15-2015, 07:02 AM
where's my table saw?
 
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removing the off fall/scrap

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Originally Posted by schnitz View Post
You nailed it. Typically, I shut the saw off, and let it spin down before removing the scrap. Rotational spin doesn't even come CLOSE to describing how rapidly that piece flew at me.
Depending on the size, length and width of the scrap there are a few ways to safely get it out of the way.

You can use a long push stick and push it way beyond and to the left of the blade.... even off the table entirely.

By the time the cut off is "free", it's location is at the center of the blade, too close and dangerous to remove it by hand. If the piece touches the blade with any force it will shoot back.

You can use the next piece to be cut to push the initial piece along and off the table.

You should NEVER reach over or around a spinning blade to remove either the save piece or the cut off.
This means a totally stopped blade, not just one that is spinning down.

I have located my on/off switch at a height where I can bump it off with my hip. This allows me to keep both my eyes and hands where I can see the blade, the cut off and the work.Then after the blade stops, I can safely remove any scraps and the workpiece.

The answer to your question will only be as detailed and specific as the question is detailed and specific. Good questions also include a sketch or a photo that illustrates your issue. (:< D)
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post #5 of 39 Old 08-15-2015, 08:28 AM Thread Starter
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For clarification, by "spinning down", I meant "spinning down to a stop", not like as in just slowing down. This scrap piece measures 24" by 23 7/8" by 1/2" (plywood).

You mention "scrap on the left". Am I doing this all wrong? I have always ended up with my scraps on the right side of the blade, making my cuts with the fence on the left of the blade (the fence was totally off the saw for this cut, and I never use it and the miter at the same time.

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post #6 of 39 Old 08-15-2015, 09:50 AM
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I never like to use the miter gauge with panels that size, sled works much better, no need to post photos of injury for my benefit.

“Everything we hear is an opinion, not a fact. Everything we see is a perspective, not the truth.”
― Marcus Aurelius
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post #7 of 39 Old 08-15-2015, 10:17 AM Thread Starter
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I didn't have a sled large enough to cut this one. And I'll post the pictures in the "lets see some damage" thread.

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post #8 of 39 Old 08-15-2015, 10:34 AM
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You mention "scrap on the left". Am I doing this all wrong?
There really isn't a right or wrong side to use. Most newer tablesaw are set up with more table on the right or more fence rail for you to put a table extension in. That along with a left tilt blade can make some operations easier or safer to do with the scrap left of the blade. That being said, many older saws are right tilt, and you can easily set your saw up to cut however you prefer.
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post #9 of 39 Old 08-15-2015, 11:57 AM Thread Starter
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Thanks d_slat, I actually went on YouTube and watched a few snippets of people using table saws. All but one cut were made opposite of how I use mine. Made me a bit uneasy about whether I was doing it wrong...

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post #10 of 39 Old 08-15-2015, 12:33 PM
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most all new saws are left tilt

Newer saws come with more rail to the right for this reason, the blade tilts to the left. The cut off falls to the left of the blade. The fence is to the right of the blade, because that's where the most rail length is AND most all users are right handed, 70 % to 90% of the population according to Wiki.




You can't hardly find a new right tilt saw these days.

So there you are cutting your panel or ripping your piece down the length. You atre standing slightly to the left of the blade, your right hand is pushing forward and in towards the fenc at the same time. You left hand is assisting in the case of a wide panel or waiting to turn the machine off on a rip.

When the piece reaches the area of the throat plate you grab the push stick which is sitting on the fence bar and push the piece all the way through beyond the blade and onto the catch table or off feed support. Hopefully you have a splitter or riving knife in place to:
1. keep the kerf on from closing, pinching the rear of the blade and stalling the saw, OR kicking it all back towards you.
2. to maintain registration against the fence if only very slightly .... no pressure applied....it just can't walk away.


Whether you have a blade cover/guard or not is up to you. Murphy's Law says "If you CAN put you fingers into a spinning blade, you just might..."
I personally don't like big plastic, blade hiding covers and just use a sandwich of 3 thin pieces of hardboard on a pivot with a friction bolt on my splitter, so it stays at what ever angle I leave it. Splitters don't allow partial depth cuts, but riving knives, new saw have them, that rise and fall with the blade do!

Here's a photo of my table saw(s) showing a blade cover, not the one I described above, but it works OK:


Now don't get alarmed because the fence is on the left side of one of the saws, it's on the right side of the left saw...two fences, two saws. well actually 3 saws.

The answer to your question will only be as detailed and specific as the question is detailed and specific. Good questions also include a sketch or a photo that illustrates your issue. (:< D)
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post #11 of 39 Old 08-15-2015, 12:55 PM
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two fences, two saws. well actually 3 saws.
You woodnthings, are the epitome of everything that I aspire to be.
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post #12 of 39 Old 08-15-2015, 02:51 PM
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I started out small

LOL

I had an 8 1/4" Skil saw, a stamped sheet metal table, a 3/8" corded drill, a hammer and a egg beater drill and a dull crosscut saw...... Ma, look at me now!
Now, so many hammers I can't count, a bevy of circular saws, more table saws than I will admit... same for RASs, bandsaws, drill presses, saber saws etc.. and ...wait battery powered stuff upstairs and downstairs.
It only took 50 years to amass that collection, and the kid will sell most of it when that day comes.

The old Skil saw still saws...... I can barely lift it now.

The answer to your question will only be as detailed and specific as the question is detailed and specific. Good questions also include a sketch or a photo that illustrates your issue. (:< D)
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post #13 of 39 Old 12-14-2015, 10:43 PM
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You woodnthings, are the epitome of everything that I aspire to be.
Yes, I agree! WoodnThings you do things RIGHT.

Jim G
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post #14 of 39 Old 12-14-2015, 10:53 PM
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I had the same thing happen. I was cutting a piece wider than the fence could handle, so I had to subtract the difference and cut. This put the good piece on the left and the scrap better the blade and the fence. As soon as the cut was completed the blade pulled the scrap backwards and it got turned sideways. You can guess what happens next. Lucky no blood was spilled. I grabbed my dial indicator and checked the alignment of the saw. The back of the blade was 5 thousands closer to the fence than the front. I adjusted it so the front was .002 closer than the back. This fixed the problem and increased cut quality.
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post #15 of 39 Old 12-15-2015, 04:38 AM Thread Starter
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In case you may have missed it (since not everyone reads the "last person" off topic thread....), I had a much worse one than my TS getting me. While at work, I had a ~75 lb window sash slam shut on my hand. 6 stitches on the middle finger of my left hand. My "medication" wore off, and it's throbbing like a mother effer now. I wish I could redo THAT prescription! Lol!!
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post #16 of 39 Old 12-15-2015, 10:11 AM
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I wouldn't use sandpaper. Sometimes I cut my push stick, and sandpaper isn't blade friendly.
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post #17 of 39 Old 12-15-2015, 01:07 PM
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Always stand just a little to the side of the work-line of a TS.

Many years ago, friend needed a place to store a 12" 220V TS. I had a 1,200sqft basement to finish.
Everything from finishing, to a gun cabinet to a doll house for my kids, I had a great experience.
Ripping a 2x4 one day. Standing behind the piece. Good ol' TS decided to spit that thing back at me, perfect crotch height. Thought I could get work, singing with the Geneva Boys Choir.
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post #18 of 39 Old 12-15-2015, 01:47 PM
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2 x 4 's are the worst

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Always stand just a little to the side of the work-line of a TS.

Many years ago, friend needed a place to store a 12" 220V TS. I had a 1,200sqft basement to finish.
Everything from finishing, to a gun cabinet to a doll house for my kids, I had a great experience.
Ripping a 2x4 one day. Standing behind the piece. Good ol' TS decided to spit that thing back at me, perfect crotch height. Thought I could get work, singing with the Geneva Boys Choir.
Quite often construction lumber in a 2 X thickness will either open or close behind the blade... reaction wood. A splitter probably would have prevented that occurence.

I'm wondering which piece shot back at you, the fence constrained piece or the off fall piece?

The answer to your question will only be as detailed and specific as the question is detailed and specific. Good questions also include a sketch or a photo that illustrates your issue. (:< D)
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post #19 of 39 Old 12-15-2015, 02:09 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Robson Valley View Post
Always stand just a little to the side of the work-line of a TS.

Many years ago, friend needed a place to store a 12" 220V TS. I had a 1,200sqft basement to finish.
Everything from finishing, to a gun cabinet to a doll house for my kids, I had a great experience.
Ripping a 2x4 one day. Standing behind the piece. Good ol' TS decided to spit that thing back at me, perfect crotch height. Thought I could get work, singing with the Geneva Boys Choir.
Holy mother of god, I cringed so hard reading that... Hope the, er, 'boys' recovered alright

I need cheaper hobby
etsy.com/shop/projectepicfail
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post #20 of 39 Old 12-15-2015, 02:17 PM
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No, man, I didn't get the chance to finish the cut.
Maybe a 24" piece, half cut before the low blow.
Happy to say that I'm not shooting blanks.
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