Table saw in middle of shop, power cord routing - Woodworking Talk - Woodworkers Forum
Reply
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
post #1 of 22 Old 08-21-2018, 05:41 PM Thread Starter
Junior Member
 
Join Date: Aug 2018
Location: Georgia
Posts: 4
View rbstern's Photo Album My Photos
Table saw in middle of shop, power cord routing

Howdy, all.

Building a new house and I'm starting to lay out my basement workshop. I have a 3hp cabinet saw, which I plan to locate in the enter of the room. I'm planning for a 20A/240v outlet on the nearest wall, about 6' away, but that means the cord is a trip hazard. Had that in my last shop. I have an open floor joist system in the ceiling above, and the house main panel is in the workshop, so running new circuits is about as simple as it gets. Don't want to trench the concrete floor, so either an overhead outlet, or some type of cover for the cord on the floor are the likely options.

And, in case it matters: I'll have a 4" dust hose running to the saw as well, on the same side the power cord originates. Could go up to the ceiling with that as well.

Interested in hearing about others' choices in this situation.
rbstern is offline  
Sponsored Links
Advertisement
 
post #2 of 22 Old 08-21-2018, 09:02 PM
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Mar 2015
Location: Garland, TX
Posts: 4,232
View Toolman50's Photo Album My Photos
A cord across the floor would be better than a cord running to the ceiling in my opinion.
Watch some Asian YouTube woodworking videos to get ideas on shop layout. (Just kidding, because they have cords running all over the floor).

If you don't have time to do it right the first time, when will you have time to do it over?
Toolman50 is offline  
post #3 of 22 Old 08-21-2018, 09:16 PM
Smart and Cool
 
Join Date: Feb 2014
Location: Oklahoma
Posts: 1,697
View shoot summ's Photo Album My Photos
I'm in the cord across the floor camp for a table saw as well. Lots of good cord protectors out there, I like the ones in the link below, good ones are pricey, but someone tripping over a cord can get really costly...

https://www.amazon.com/Durable-Cable...HXDV6JF198Q13N
shoot summ is online now  
Sponsored Links
Advertisement
 
post #4 of 22 Old 08-21-2018, 09:18 PM
Moderator
 
Steve Neul's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2011
Posts: 25,380
View Steve Neul's Photo Album My Photos
The dust collector hose is one thing but the power cord is small. You could make a wooden threshold with a dado in the middle for the wire and glue it to the floor with some construction adhesive.
Steve Neul is online now  
post #5 of 22 Old 08-22-2018, 01:19 AM
where's my table saw?
 
woodnthings's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2009
Location: SE, Michigan
Posts: 25,032
View woodnthings's Photo Album My Photos
Here's an idea ...

Just bury a 6" PVC pipe under the concrete with a 90 degree elbow and a cap on the end so it won't fill up with crete when you pour. You can locate it with coordinates and chisel it out later. Run your dust hose and power cords down through it and up in the center... done.

The answer to your question will only be as detailed and specific as the question is detailed and specific. Good questions also include a sketch or a photo that illustrates your issue. (:< D)
woodnthings is online now  
post #6 of 22 Old 08-22-2018, 05:14 AM
Village Idiot
 
epicfail48's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2014
Location: Springfield MO
Posts: 4,498
View epicfail48's Photo Album My Photos
Quote:
Originally Posted by woodnthings View Post
Just bury a 6" PVC pipe under the concrete with a 90 degree elbow and a cap on the end so it won't fill up with crete when you pour. You can locate it with coordinates and chisel it out later. Run your dust hose and power cords down through it and up in the center... done.
Think the floors already there, OP mentioned setting up a basement shop. Interesting idea though, though id rather run conduit for the electrical lines. Im paranoid and overbuild where possible when it comes to electricity.

As far as the original question goes, i vote for running the cables on the floor and putting a protector over them, something like these gizmos:
https://www.amazon.com/Black-Channel...er+cable+cover

Dont skimp on these, you want something bulky enough to keep itself to sit on the floor, with beveled edges so anything you roll around wont get hung up on them

I need cheaper hobby
etsy.com/shop/projectepicfail
epicfail48 is offline  
post #7 of 22 Old 08-22-2018, 06:42 AM
Senior Member
 
hawkeye10's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2015
Location: Murfreesboro, Tn.
Posts: 1,002
View hawkeye10's Photo Album My Photos
I am a ceiling guy. There is a trip hazard with running it across the floor and if it's like my shop I roll tools around. I have some really good 25' extension cords that I cut in half and use them to plug my tools into when needed. There is a lot of ways to do things, you just need to find what works for you.

Don in Murfreesboro, TN.
hawkeye10 is offline  
post #8 of 22 Old 08-22-2018, 06:46 AM
Moderator
 
Steve Neul's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2011
Posts: 25,380
View Steve Neul's Photo Album My Photos
I worked at a shop onetime that the owner of the shop had the building built and put dust collection piping under the concrete. By the time I worked there the guy had changed his mind where to locate the machinery and he had all these unused holes in the floor all over the shop. I plan to use underground piping in my own shop however my shop has a dirt floor where I could dig up the pipe and relocate it.
Steve Neul is online now  
post #9 of 22 Old 08-22-2018, 07:10 AM
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Jul 2008
Location: Florida Panhandle
Posts: 11,479
View GeorgeC's Photo Album My Photos
I have plugs in the ceiling and extension cords of the floor., Mixed emotions on all of them. I do not think I would like an extension cord around a table saw. Just swing too long pieces of lumber at that machine.


George
GeorgeC is offline  
post #10 of 22 Old 08-22-2018, 08:16 AM
Wood machinist
 
difalkner's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2011
Location: NW Louisiana
Posts: 3,154
View difalkner's Photo Album My Photos
Welcome to the forum! When you get a minute complete your profile with first name in your signature line and your location so it will show in the left panel.

I run all of mine across the floor and it's never been a problem. I'd have a bigger issue with cords running up to the ceiling. Every time I want to swing a board around end for end I'd be hitting a cord going up to the ceiling.

These have been like this for 4-5 years and I've never tripped over them nor has anyone else coming to the shop. And to my way of thinking I wouldn't put any covering over them because that would just make it higher and easier to trip over. Unless you need to be running fork lifts or pallet jacks or something like that over them then the cord(s) themselves present a very low profile. I also run my 4" DC hose on the floor to each machine as I use them.

Table saw in middle of shop, power cord routing-012-cords-across-floor.jpg

Table saw in middle of shop, power cord routing-013-cords-into-power-center.jpg

David

PS - Here's our shop layout if this helps
Table saw in middle of shop, power cord routing-shop-12-5-17.jpg

David

Curly Wood Shop on Etsy
David Falkner - Woodworking YouTube channel
Our music at church - current videos Airline Baptist BC Facebook Live
Romans 3:23

Last edited by difalkner; 08-22-2018 at 08:20 AM.
difalkner is online now  
post #11 of 22 Old 08-22-2018, 09:11 AM
Senior Member
 
TomCT2's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2014
Location: Central PA
Posts: 1,160
View TomCT2's Photo Album My Photos
on the floor you can't sweep, rolling / moving stuff is irksome, and then you trip over it. if you walk on it enough, the internal rubbing can short out the wires . . .

my saw is in the middle of the 'shop' and the outlet is overhead. there is a post off to the left, so the cord runs down the post then across the floor. no matter where you hang it, it will eventually be in the wrong place - for power around my build/work table I took the overhead approach with hooks in various places. if the cord is in the wrong spot, easy / quick to move . . .


(actually I later replaced the pictured cord with a longer one...)
Attached Thumbnails
Click image for larger version

Name:	DSC_4831.jpg
Views:	76
Size:	254.4 KB
ID:	365358  

TomCT2 is offline  
post #12 of 22 Old 08-22-2018, 10:24 AM
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Jan 2010
Location: NW Pa
Posts: 2,785
View TimPa's Photo Album My Photos
+1 on the ceiling drop. I happen to have a lally column 2' away from my unisaw that I boxed in pine and placed the outlet on it. in the 20 years, it maybe got in my way 3 times.


an extension cord on the floor would never work in my shop. to each his own...
TimPa is offline  
post #13 of 22 Old 08-22-2018, 11:08 AM
Wood machinist
 
difalkner's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2011
Location: NW Louisiana
Posts: 3,154
View difalkner's Photo Album My Photos
Quote:
Originally Posted by TimPa View Post
...an extension cord on the floor would never work in my shop. to each his own...
Just for clarification I don't have any extension cords on the floor. Those are all sufficiently sized cables run from each machine all the way to their respective outlets.

In our small shop if I had drops that would make it feel even smaller by restricting the limited space even in the air. But I agree - to each his own. This works great for me.

David

David

Curly Wood Shop on Etsy
David Falkner - Woodworking YouTube channel
Our music at church - current videos Airline Baptist BC Facebook Live
Romans 3:23
difalkner is online now  
post #14 of 22 Old 08-22-2018, 11:10 AM Thread Starter
Junior Member
 
Join Date: Aug 2018
Location: Georgia
Posts: 4
View rbstern's Photo Album My Photos
Thanks, all, for the feedback. If I go with cords on floor, I will get a good cord protector. And, yes, the concrete is already poured, house already framed and roofed, so foundation mods...don't really want to go there.

Follow up question: Anybody set up their shop with the table saw's fence side against a wall or another bench? It cuts off walk-around space on one side, but it solves the hose and cord routing issue. Main area of shop is about 15x22'.
rbstern is offline  
post #15 of 22 Old 08-22-2018, 11:51 AM
Senior Member
 
Maylar's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2013
Location: South Central Connecticut
Posts: 1,147
View Maylar's Photo Album My Photos
I highly recommend that power tools be on mobile bases. You can store it against a wall out of the way and move it easily if needed.

My table saw sits near a boxed support column with outlets and that suffices for most work that I do. If the pole is in the way I can wheel the saw to another location temporarily and use an extension cord. The pole also has hooks for push blocks, miter gauge, finger board, etc.

If you do run power across the floor, keep a rubber mat or two handy to throw over the wire so you don't trip on it. No need to be fancy about that.

Dave in CT, USA
Maylar is offline  
post #16 of 22 Old 08-22-2018, 02:22 PM
An experienced novice
 
Join Date: Jun 2015
Location: Grants Pass OR
Posts: 314
View GuitarPhotographer's Photo Album My Photos
Currently my table saw power cord just lays on the floor. I know where it is, so I don't trip over it, but... When I install permanent overhead dust collection ducting, I'll route the power cord overhead alongside the DC ducting.

<Chas>
I'll burn that bridge when I come to it
GuitarPhotographer is offline  
post #17 of 22 Old 08-22-2018, 04:01 PM
where's my table saw?
 
woodnthings's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2009
Location: SE, Michigan
Posts: 25,032
View woodnthings's Photo Album My Photos
You gonna drywall this place?

I have 2 shops, one I put all the wiring inside and behind the drywall in the ceiling and walls, the other I used thinwall conduit surface mounted on the drywall. I can easily change the wiring in the thinwall, the other shop, not at all.

What I did do in the shop with concealed wiring is make a ceiling drop AND a wall outlet on the same 240 V run. I can use either plug that way and I do favor the wall plugs over the drops. Currently, I have some machines on single 240 V. plug drops where the sloped ceiling is lower and they are easy to reach and change machines. There is no one right way, just think through all the possibilities you may encounter before covering the wiring with drywall. You can't have too many outlets! I filled an entire 100 AMP 24 slot panel for this one shop. Remember 240 V outlets use up 2 slots each.

The answer to your question will only be as detailed and specific as the question is detailed and specific. Good questions also include a sketch or a photo that illustrates your issue. (:< D)
woodnthings is online now  
post #18 of 22 Old 08-22-2018, 08:50 PM Thread Starter
Junior Member
 
Join Date: Aug 2018
Location: Georgia
Posts: 4
View rbstern's Photo Album My Photos
Quote:
Originally Posted by woodnthings View Post
You gonna drywall this place?
Partly. There's about 16' of foundation wall that is 5', with framing sitting atop,up to the 9', open joist ceiling. The framed part of the wall is batting insulation, so I plan to drywall it, to prevent dust accumulation. I've already installed some outlets on a 120v/20 amp circuit in the framed section for miscellaneous tool use, plus a 120v/20amp dedicated to dust collection circuit, and a 240v/20amp for the saw. The rear of the shop (and house) is about 15' width of exterior wall, also insulated, with a 3/0 door. I've added 120v/20amp outlets on that wall, and that will get also get drywall, to cover the batting. The rest is either concrete foundation wall, or a shared wall with another basement room that will have it's own sheet rock, leaving me with the open studs on the workshop side of the shared wall.
rbstern is offline  
post #19 of 22 Old 08-22-2018, 08:55 PM Thread Starter
Junior Member
 
Join Date: Aug 2018
Location: Georgia
Posts: 4
View rbstern's Photo Album My Photos
P.S., meant to add, for lighting, I am using these:

https://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B076FQ15R6/

I've used these same style lights in my previous basement shop, and my wife's art studio/workshop, and they are absolutely awesome. Using 17 of these fixtures, totaling 340 watts, and the lighting is awesome. Blows away the old twin tube flourescents that were always going through bulbs and ballasts.
rbstern is offline  
post #20 of 22 Old 08-22-2018, 09:32 PM
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Feb 2018
Posts: 132
View pro70z28's Photo Album My Photos
Quote:
Originally Posted by rbstern View Post
P.S., meant to add, for lighting, I am using these:

https://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B076FQ15R6/

I've used these same style lights in my previous basement shop, and my wife's art studio/workshop, and they are absolutely awesome. Using 17 of these fixtures, totaling 340 watts, and the lighting is awesome. Blows away the old twin tube flourescents that were always going through bulbs and ballasts.

But will they power a table saw?
pro70z28 is offline  
Reply

Quick Reply
Message:
Options

Register Now



In order to be able to post messages on the Woodworking Talk - Woodworkers Forum forums, you must first register.
Please enter your desired user name, your email address and other required details in the form below.

User Name:
Password
Please enter a password for your user account. Note that passwords are case-sensitive.

Password:


Confirm Password:
Email Address
Please enter a valid email address for yourself.

Email Address:
OR

Log-in










Thread Tools
Show Printable Version Show Printable Version
Email this Page Email this Page
Display Modes
Linear Mode Linear Mode



Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Sled with "roller bearing" support for table saw? JimGnitecki Power Tools & Machinery 34 04-03-2019 11:35 AM
Bandsaw versus table saw AND planer? JimGnitecki Power Tools & Machinery 50 01-10-2016 11:02 PM
What power tools do I need to make precision wooden childrenís toys? JimGnitecki Power Tools & Machinery 57 12-11-2015 12:17 AM
Table Saw Power Switch arvanlaar Power Tools & Machinery 13 12-03-2015 11:22 AM
Wolfcraft 6157 router table. dbhost Tool Reviews 2 10-02-2015 07:22 PM

Posting Rules  
You may post new threads
You may post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off

 
For the best viewing experience please update your browser to Google Chrome