Table Saw Blade Height . - Page 2 - Woodworking Talk - Woodworkers Forum
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post #21 of 41 Old 01-09-2016, 11:04 AM
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Here is something from Freud about blade height for Freud saw blade.

I feel this one has been rehashed a few times but I must interject again that if you are using the correct Freud blade for the application, the blade should be set so that 1/2 of a tooth is protruding through the material. So, if you are cutting 3" thick material with a 10" blade, the blade would be at full height. The idea is to have 3-5 teeth in the cut when ripping and 5-7 for crosscut and man made materials. If you cannot achieve this and keep the blade at 1/2 tooth height, you have the wrong blade for the application.

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Charles M
Freud, Inc.
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Howie..........
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post #22 of 41 Old 01-09-2016, 12:23 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by HowardAcheson View Post
Here is something from Freud about blade height for Freud saw blade.

I feel this one has been rehashed a few times but I must interject again that if you are using the correct Freud blade for the application, the blade should be set so that 1/2 of a tooth is protruding through the material. So, if you are cutting 3" thick material with a 10" blade, the blade would be at full height. The idea is to have 3-5 teeth in the cut when ripping and 5-7 for crosscut and man made materials. If you cannot achieve this and keep the blade at 1/2 tooth height, you have the wrong blade for the application.

------------------
Charles M
Freud, Inc.
In any industry there are best practices, tried and true methods that are efficient and safe, time has proven them to be so.

The danger is in forums such is this are the solutions given for problems that shouldn't exist in the first place.
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post #23 of 41 Old 01-09-2016, 12:32 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by cabinetman View Post
I used to be the only one here that preferred to run a blade high. It seems some have changed their mind. With the blade high, the first force to the stock is down and against the table. With the blade high the cutting angle is more vertical, which means less blade to wood contact. With the blade run low (teeth/gullets near the top of the stock), the angle of cut is much longer, the blade runs hotter, and there is more tooth contact with the wood. There is more of a tendency for frontal lift of the stock as the blade enters.
+1: Less push back when blade is high and pushing down on the board.
A short blade height can actually contribute to a kick-back.
For close work, I sometimes lower the blade, but for ripping stock, it's safer to fully raise the blade.
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post #24 of 41 Old 01-09-2016, 12:48 PM
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Originally Posted by Toolman50 View Post
+1: Less push back when blade is high and pushing down on the board.
A short blade height can actually contribute to a kick-back.
For close work, I sometimes lower the blade, but for ripping stock, it's safer to fully raise the blade.
Thanks for proving my point.
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post #25 of 41 Old 01-09-2016, 02:10 PM
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Thanks for proving my point.

+1..........
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post #26 of 41 Old 01-09-2016, 03:20 PM
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My Skilsaw has an adjustable shoe plate which I use to set blade depth. Seems to do a better job in thin materials like 3/8" plywood and door skin if I have the blade set for about 1".
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post #27 of 41 Old 01-09-2016, 04:28 PM
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Really?

I don't understand how blade height or lack of it would cause kickback.... it may require increased feed pressure or a reduction in feed rate, but unlikely a kickback. The higher the blade the more efficient the saw will cut because of better attack or approach angle. I don't see how cross cutting or ripping with the same blade at the same height would make a huge difference....however, ripping is more difficult for a blade with insufficient gullets above the work... with no place for the sawdust to exit. Having said that, I don't think much sawdust exits the gullets as opposed to being carried down into the saw's base.

I think through actual operation, a woodworker will find what works best for them and continue to use that set of parameters.... feed rate and blade height based on material thickness and type. Thick hardwood like 6/4 or 8/4 would require a different approach and blade than 1/2" veneer plywood.

The answer to your question will only be as detailed and specific as the question is detailed and specific. Good questions also include a sketch or a photo that illustrates your issue. (:< D)

Last edited by woodnthings; 01-09-2016 at 05:13 PM.
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post #28 of 41 Old 01-09-2016, 07:37 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Robson Valley View Post
My Skilsaw has an adjustable shoe plate which I use to set blade depth. Seems to do a better job in thin materials like 3/8" plywood and door skin if I have the blade set for about 1".
You are correct. What we are saying above is when the blade is raised fully, the teeth are pushing down on the board. We are talking about 3/4" or more lumber.
When cutting thin woods and veneers this would cause more tear-out and a rougher cut and needs a different approach.
We have to cut veneers and thin woods differently than when normal cutting. We even use different blades, tape the line and sometimes use a sacrificial board for a clean cut in veneers.
You have seen this with your Skilsaw.
Two totally different things.
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post #29 of 41 Old 01-15-2016, 02:16 AM
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I've went to mostly rough sawn lumber in our scroll saw/wood shop. Most everything I've been getting lately is right at 13/16". In October, I bought some maple & oak that was 1". I dress the wood to rough size on the ts. My ts is just an 8". Very seldom will I get teeth over an 1/8" above the top face of the board. Why? There is no point to having a saw blade standing up there, hunting fingers to cut. Even after I've run the wood through the planer & jointer, & finish cut it, the saw blade is never over an 1/8" above the top face. And my saw is old enough, it don't have any guards of any kind, nor a splitter. I use a Diablo thin kerf blade for most applications. Except cross cutting.

Sawdust 703
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post #30 of 41 Old 01-15-2016, 06:41 AM
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Talking

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OK so how do we handle a hand circular saw ? Skil worm gear, of course, nothing else is worth owning.
As little as possible? Makita direct drive, of course, nothing else is worth owing.
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post #31 of 41 Old 01-15-2016, 04:00 PM
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I was cutting some 1/4 in stock for a friend and he was impressed about how sharp my blades were. I was always told that the blade should just cut through the board. As I have a brother who lost the tip of a finger with the blade too high and not skilled enough to be working on the saw in the first place.
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post #32 of 41 Old 07-26-2018, 11:14 PM
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It would seem to me the saw blade doesn't cut on the leading edge or upstroke so there would be nothing to clear out of gullet. Cutting on the trailing edge or downstroke the gullet would have plenty of time to clear itself after passing through the wood. Kind of explains why all the sawdust ends up under the saw.
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post #33 of 41 Old 07-27-2018, 08:15 AM
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Originally Posted by steve823 View Post
It would seem to me the saw blade doesn't cut on the leading edge or upstroke so there would be nothing to clear out of gullet. Cutting on the trailing edge or downstroke the gullet would have plenty of time to clear itself after passing through the wood. Kind of explains why all the sawdust ends up under the saw.
Steve sometimes I wonder. I sure get a lot of dust on top of my table and I don't like it.

Don in Murfreesboro, TN.
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post #34 of 41 Old 07-27-2018, 02:19 PM
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This video is from a Forrest sales representative:


In it, he says:

* Rip Cut: Raise the blade high. The carbide stays cooler and expands less during the cut.
* Crosscut Solid Wood: Raise the blade one inch above the top of the wood.
* Plywood: Set the blade height so that the bottom of the gullet is at the height of the plywood, to reduce or eliminate tearout. Cutting plywood is hard on blades and dulls them faster. If you have a Woodworker II blade, try to limit the amount of plywood that you cut or buy one of their plywood blades.


Here are my own thoughts about blade height:

High Blades (recommended for rip cuts):
* Fewest possible teeth in contact with the wood at any given time.
* Less friction, less heat. Less likely to burn the wood
* Less heat, less expansion of the carbide tips. The kerf remains more uniform.
* Less heat, lowers the chances of burning the wood.
* The carbide tips expand less, so there is a lower chance that a tip might grab the wood and cause a kickback.
* Lower effort to push wood through blade.

Low Blades at Bottom of Gullet (recommended for plywood cuts):
* Most teeth in contact with the wood at a given time.
* Most teeth per inch of cut means smoother cuts with less tearout.
* More friction, more heat, with associated issues. (Hotter blade, more carbide tip expansion, more effort to push wood through blade, etc.)

Blades Raised to One Inch Above Work (recommended for crosscuts):
* Probably a Forrest compromise to balance smoothness of cut and reduce tearout with keeping friction and heat to an acceptable level.
* Has a balance of pros and cons from both approaches above (high blade and low blade).
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post #35 of 41 Old 07-28-2018, 03:29 AM
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Horse died two years ago and we are still flogging it. 😊
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post #36 of 41 Old 07-28-2018, 04:43 AM
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I'll whip up more discussion

Not only blade height, but blade types are important. The physics of cutting through a piece of wood are constantly changing with each tooth that enter the work. The angle of entry changes constantly and is a dynamic process, since all the cutting occurs at the front of the blade. The kerf is already made for the rear of the blade, so those teeth have little to do except carry away some of the dust. We all know that some dust gets spun around and spit out the top of the kerf, getting in our face.

The fibers of the wood are in different orientations when ripping than cross cutting in hardwood. This means you need a different type of blade for each operation. This article is helpful:

https://makezine.com/2016/09/15/unde...de-essentials/

And this:
http://www.woodworkersjournal.com/wh...est-saw-blade/

The answer to your question will only be as detailed and specific as the question is detailed and specific. Good questions also include a sketch or a photo that illustrates your issue. (:< D)
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post #37 of 41 Old 07-28-2018, 07:48 AM
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Silly discussion. The blade height means very little, just keep the blade low enough you don't cut something off if you slip. The correct blade for the application you are doing is the only thing important. As far as dust on top of the saw the blade will cut a certain amount of wood on the up cut especially ripping solid wood where the wood sometimes tends to close up behind the blade.
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post #38 of 41 Old 08-06-2018, 10:06 PM
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Consider the saw blade as a circle of skew chisels.
As you all know, the skew alters the apparent entry angle and reduces the load on the edge (tooth.)
What you're after is to have these little skews carving into the wood as a low angle.

You do not need the violent stress of the skews chopping straight down hard with each bite.
In that, the mechanics of every tooth travel is the same.

Think of setting the blade height such that the skews are making slice-cuts, maybe even 45* cuts,
across the grain of the woods in most instances.

With absolutely no evidence whatsoever and no advice whatsoever, I raise the blade to 2X the thickness of the wood.
I have only been hit in the face once with a single TC tooth that stuck in my forehead at 180mph.
I was cutting 1/4" Plexiglas, I must have had the blade up an inch or more.
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post #39 of 41 Old 08-07-2018, 07:45 AM
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This is like the question of preferring blondes or brunettes. I have always raised the blade just so the gullet clears the surface of the wood. Never really experimented any other way as some have described here. I think one thing to consider about the TS is the size of the motor which would determine if the motor is under load or not. My Ryobi BT3000 isn't the biggest so I have to take it easy in feeding the wood into the blade. The main thing is to keep your hands and fingers faaaar away from the blade.

A diamond is how coal reacts under pressure.
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post #40 of 41 Old 08-09-2018, 12:14 PM
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This is one of those subjects that if you repeat it often enough, some people start to believe you, and others believe you because you have such a high post count.

“Everything we hear is an opinion, not a fact. Everything we see is a perspective, not the truth.”
― Marcus Aurelius
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