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post #21 of 52 Old 04-06-2014, 07:05 PM
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........ And regarding the tube type....you need a higher ceiling to make them work.
Height under my trusses is about 13'6". Something reminds that I have a 4/12 pitch. Not sure though. I don't know if I have to hang the tube heater above the bottom chord of the trusses or is below the bottom chord enough for heat distribution. Hopefully the provider can answer those questions when I get to that point.

Jon
Northern Michigan
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post #22 of 52 Old 01-01-2015, 10:58 AM
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Depending on the regulations where you live, are there any restrictions concerning wood heaters? I have a wood heater in my shop that uses all the scraps I accumulate over a year, and a supply of firewood outside. I just replaced my old wood heater I had for 10 years; last Jan. Fortunately I was lucky to find one that was of the same design from the same manufacture on Craigs List. All though it was one size smaller then what I had, I didn't have to change the exhust, Just had to raise it 3 inches off the floor. New they go for $400-$500, I got it for $125. Wasn't used much, but I did have to replace the fire door seal.

The pic is of my old heater, the newer one looks the same except it is one size smaller. It also has a fan on the rear. Works good for my needs.

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post #23 of 52 Old 01-01-2015, 11:47 AM
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I use to have a wood heater like that, I loved it, I could load it down at night and it would still be going in the morning, but that was in my house. I used one of the kerosene bullet heaters and drew outside air in one of my shops, worked great but was kinda expensive to burn. You sure don't want to do any laminating counter tops using one of the bullet heaters.

How do you keep dust off your wood heater? Just curious.

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post #24 of 52 Old 01-01-2015, 12:34 PM
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I use to have a wood heater like that, I loved it, I could load it down at night and it would still be going in the morning, but that was in my house. I used one of the kerosene bullet heaters and drew outside air in one of my shops, worked great but was kinda expensive to burn. You sure don't want to do any laminating counter tops using one of the bullet heaters.

How do you keep dust off your wood heater? Just curious.
I brush it off on the first start of the season, don't worry about it after that. I guess it just burn off while it is in operation.

My father was my inspiration for woodworking, wish he was still around for more advice. Luv ya Dad.
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post #25 of 52 Old 08-31-2015, 05:48 PM
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I found several different industrial shop heaters for you at http://www.beacontechnology.com/indu...-shop-heaters/ that covers all price ranges. I would suggest an infrared heater. It can be adjusted to best fit your space and the radiant heat will heat your shop without the use of a blower to interrupt your projects and make a mess.
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post #26 of 52 Old 08-31-2015, 05:57 PM
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Natural gas and propane space heaters can do a great job heating your house or shop. If it isn't vented just be careful not to run it very long or attempt to sleep in a area with one. The will build carbon monoxide and get you if you are not careful. The gas is more sneaky than the torpedo kerosene heaters.
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post #27 of 52 Old 08-31-2015, 06:21 PM
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I have a hot dawg natural gas heater. My shop is 30x40 and the heater is 75,000 btu. I can heat it up to working temperature in about 5 minutes. Don't wast time&money on an unvented gas heater. You might as well leave a water hose running in the shop.
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post #28 of 52 Old 08-31-2015, 06:54 PM
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Post number 25 smells a little like a canned meat like product...

I use a small U-Tube Natural Gas IR (radiant) in my 15' x 30' garage. It's about 15' long, vented from outside and up through the roof. It's 45,000 BTUs and burns my forehead if I stand under it too long. The ceiling is only 8'.
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post #29 of 52 Old 08-31-2015, 09:47 PM
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I use a heating/cooling unit from a motel/hotel. The cooling part doesn't work but heating works excellent. Most motels,etc discard these things when the cooling cost more than a new unit or there upgrading. Many have these sitting in there maintenance room just waiting for a woodworker to offer $50 to move it out of there way.
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post #30 of 52 Old 09-17-2015, 04:30 PM
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I have a 24 x40 shop and just hooked up my outside boiler to it. heat ex-changer is 125,000 BTU's. should keep shop toasty all winter and it gets cold here. Been told should use same amount of wood that I have been using heating the house.
I have to come up with a filter to cover the blower yet,should work as a air cleaner also, but not sure. It's mounted up in 1 corner and it blows allot of air.
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post #31 of 52 Old 09-17-2015, 06:03 PM
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I am in the process of installing A/c and heat in my garage shop now.
I have talked about doing this for years. I have a 3 car garage/shop.
My garage has no insulation in the walls or the ceiling. In the summer it will get to 100 degrees. I have no windows. I can't work in my garage in the summer.
I purchased an 18,000 btu unit that will both heat and cool.
I'm in the process of cutting the hole in the garage wall to mount the unit.
I have the interior rectangle cut but I haven't cut the outside brick veneer.
I will insulate the ceiling but since I have the attic floored for storage, this will be a big project also.
New insulated garage doors will be installed later this month.
With the new unit, insulated doors and R-19 in the ceiling, I hope to use my shop year round.
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post #32 of 52 Old 09-22-2015, 11:05 PM
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I heat my 20x36 shop with in floor radiant heat. I put 1000 ft of hepex tubing between my floor joist. I put a boiler in the basement of our house and buried the supply and return line in a 3in pvc pipe 4ft under ground to my shop. don't have to deal with any dust in the boiler that way. 180 degree water runs thru the loops. I leave the t stat on 68 and don't touch it. best heat you can have.
if you have a concrete floor in your shop then don't dismiss baseboard radiant. works good as well and easy to do if your retrofitting. new construction, put the tubes in the concrete. you just cant run that hot of water thru them, 125 degrees or so
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post #33 of 52 Old 09-24-2015, 11:45 PM
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My mountain home is 2 floors, 2360 sqft total, 3 bedrooms up, 2 complete kitchens, 2 1/2 baths, walk-in cold room, library, workshop, I've got it all. My Harman PP38+ wood pellet stove heats it all. Over the first 5 winters, that stove saved me the capital cost of the stove & pipes ($3k)and the capital cost ($2k) of a back-up solar power system.
Oil prices in those days were on a constant climb. So, I made my nut and now, I buy wood pellets for maybe $240/ton, 5 T/winter and long term, spend nothing.
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post #34 of 52 Old 05-13-2016, 09:01 PM
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Originally Posted by Steve Neul View Post
Just don't get one of those infared heaters. Once you get in front of one it hard to get away from them and the woodworking stops.

Just an update on my shop heat. Natural gas was not cost effective, and I could not penetrate the walls or the roof. (Condo regs) So I put in one of these.

http://www.northerntool.com/shop/too...6413_200446413

17kBtu infrared heater. Installed in late winter, and yes my head gets heated before my toes. Yes it does turn the electric meter, but I am warm. Haven't used it in the bitter cold yet. It hangs about 11 - 12 ft above the floor and throws cone of heat about 15ft long at the floor. Installed over my work/assembly table by the table saw, in the center of the 24ft wide pole barn. Towards the edges of the shop, I can feel the heat at the jointer and sander.

I also installed an air filter to try and keep ahead of dust accumulating in the shop.

So I am happy with it so far. It may not be the answer for others.

Jon
Northern Michigan
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post #35 of 52 Old 05-13-2016, 09:35 PM
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For a shop where you are not sleeping there you could have used a non-vented gas heater. It's just after an extended length of time it would build up with carbon monoxide.
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post #36 of 52 Old 05-14-2016, 08:41 AM
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For a shop where you are not sleeping there you could have used a non-vented gas heater. It's just after an extended length of time it would build up with carbon monoxide.
Unfortunately I could not get natural gas or propane as a fuel. So electric is all I am left with. I just have to watch my usage, and which tools are running on the 100 amp service. Jon
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post #37 of 52 Old 05-14-2016, 12:18 PM
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Moark,
I just recently installed heat and a/c in my garage. My garage is about the same size as yours.
It was somewhat expensive even doing it myself because of all the steps I took.
I replaced my garage doors with new insulated doors.
I added attic insulation.
I cut a new hole in the garage wall and installed a 220 box unit that will both heat and cool. Set the unit as close to the ceiling as i could get it.
Installed a designated 220 circuit for the unit.
I am very pleased with the result. I can control my shop temperature for the first time. I can warm or cool my shop now in only a matter of minutes. Turn it all off when I stop.
My gift to me!

If you don't have time to do it right the first time, when will you have time to do it over?
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post #38 of 52 Old 05-26-2016, 03:41 AM
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I'll probably do something with my shop/garage one of these days, but the Mrs wants to park her car in it too someday.
I'll probably build something like a cheapo frame to make plastic sheeting walls although another nice rigid wall would be pretty nifty and force her to clean up her side of the garage to park her car over there instead of invading my side. Plus it would cut down on MY dust invading her side.. We're blessed with a big garage I guess. A small space heater for winter and summer? Tough luck for me. It's S Carolina and can't afford to cool the garage, but I'm ok with heat, it's cold that gets to me.
I have given some serious thought to insulating the steel garage door and since it's attached to the house insulation can't hurt for the heating bill. Anyone have any thoughts on the best way to insulate a wide, steel garage door? I thought of expandable foam, but it's messy so I'll most likely use sheet foam attached with construction adhesive.

I figured it's time to change my signature so hold your breath. This is it.
Impressive, huh?

Last edited by allpurpose; 05-26-2016 at 03:48 AM.
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post #39 of 52 Old 05-26-2016, 03:56 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Rebelwork View Post
I use a heating/cooling unit from a motel/hotel. The cooling part doesn't work but heating works excellent. Most motels,etc discard these things when the cooling cost more than a new unit or there upgrading. Many have these sitting in there maintenance room just waiting for a woodworker to offer $50 to move it out of there way.
Back when I hauled scrap metal for a living (sort of a living) those motel units were everywhere. I had probably 30 of them stacked out back and most worked fine. Motels will actually pay you to haul them away or at least I got paid to do it and got the scrap price as a bonus.. Copper, aluminum, etc..

I figured it's time to change my signature so hold your breath. This is it.
Impressive, huh?
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post #40 of 52 Old 05-27-2016, 08:23 AM
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I have given some serious thought to insulating the steel garage door and since it's attached to the house insulation can't hurt for the heating bill. Anyone have any thoughts on the best way to insulate a wide, steel garage door? I thought of expandable foam, but it's messy so I'll most likely use sheet foam attached with construction adhesive.
I insulated a steel door with 1" foam board. I cut 2 pieces of foam to fit tight in the door sections. Pushed them into place. Then I used alumninum trim metal to cover the foam. Metal was tucked underdoor hinges, etc. Foam board was tight enough to stay in place without adhesive. Jon
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