The router bit me, now its time to reevaluate the safety of my shop - Woodworking Talk - Woodworkers Forum
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
post #1 of 10 Old 05-09-2013, 01:26 AM Thread Starter
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Nov 2011
Location: Queensbury, NY
Posts: 272
View Upstate's Photo Album My Photos
The router bit me, now its time to reevaluate the safety of my shop

So I was setting up to rout a lock miter in a small maple box I was building last week, and while running a test piece through vertically on the fence, experienced a case of kick back, the board flew from my grasp, and sucked my hand into the bit. Ouch! It took off a nice chunk of my finger tip. Needless to say, the shop looks like a crime scene at the moment with the blood splatters, and I won't be making lock miters any time soon.

The cause? Could be a number of things I suppose...
A) router speed too slow
B) too small of a test piece
C) tired and working late

Anyways, not that push pads would have definitely let me avoid this situation, but I'm due for a few safety upgrades... the first being push blocks/pads. Do any of you have any suggestions? I was looking at bench dog push blocs, http://www.rockler.com/m/product.cfm?page=30571? Thoughts?

Attached is a (blurry) pic of my finger from the day after that doesn't do it justice, and a pic of it almost healed a week later. Looks like it went though a blender. I figured the doctor wouldn't be able to do much to it besides give me antibiotics, so I globbed some neosporin on it 4 times a day for a week and went through 3 boxes of bandaids, and it's almost all healed completely, albeit slightly deformed.
Attached Images
  
Upstate is offline  
Sponsored Links
Advertisement
 
post #2 of 10 Old 05-09-2013, 06:45 AM
where's my table saw?
 
woodnthings's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2009
Location: SE, Michigan
Posts: 27,001
View woodnthings's Photo Album My Photos
What did happen?

The router bit me, now its time to reevaluate the safety of my shop
So I was setting up to rout a lock miter in a small maple box I was building last week, and while running a test piece through vertically on the fence, experienced a case of kick back, the board flew from my grasp, and sucked my hand into the bit. Ouch! It took off a nice chunk of my finger tip. Needless to say, the shop looks like a crime scene at the moment with the blood splatters, and I won't be making lock miters any time soon.

The cause? Could be a number of things I suppose...
A) router speed too slow
B) too small of a test piece
C) tired and working late

Unless the bit traps the work, like a dovetail, it should have been safe. A slower speed is not the best unless the diameter is larger. There is a recommended speed to diameter relationship in this chart: http://www.newwoodworker.com/ref/rtrbtspds.html

I suspect the test piece was too short, tipped and caused the kickback. I always run the longest scrap I can find, since a few minutes spent looking for one will save hours/days if anything goes wrong. No time was saved by "rushing" the operation. Slow down, be safer ..... albeit hindsight is 20/20.

The most often cause of shop accidents that I've heard...working late, tired, and in a rush.

As someone who had a crushed fingertip I "feel your pain" it still works fine, just looks weird.

The answer to your question will only be as detailed and specific as the question is detailed and specific. Good questions also include a sketch or a photo that illustrates your issue. (:< D)
woodnthings is online now  
post #3 of 10 Old 05-09-2013, 07:18 AM
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Apr 2012
Location: Waynesfield, OH
Posts: 1,510
View Fred Hargis's Photo Album My Photos
I have 3 of those Bench Dog push blocs and I find them to be the best commercial ones I've seen. They are a lot larger than most, and the pads grip even very slick surfaces like melamine and prefinished plywood really well. Add to that they really that much more expensive than the smaller ones, I think they are a good buy. That said, I agree with woodnthings that the piece wasn't trapped, so the cause of the kickback is puzzling.

"I long for the days when coke was a cola and a joint was a bad place to be" (Merle Haggard)
Fred Hargis is offline  
Sponsored Links
Advertisement
 
post #4 of 10 Old 05-09-2013, 07:36 AM
Old School
 
cabinetman's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2007
Location: So. Florida
Posts: 24,027
View cabinetman's Photo Album My Photos
If you could explain exactly how it happened would be beneficial in addressing how to do the procedure you were attempting, and would help others to avoid the same mishap.

Router speed isn't a major cause. Before variable speed routers came out, routing procedures were performed safely using due care.






.
cabinetman is offline  
post #5 of 10 Old 05-09-2013, 08:34 AM
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Aug 2010
Location: Maine
Posts: 1,932
View Hammer1's Photo Album My Photos
It would help to show your router table set up. In many cases, the opening in the fence around the bit can cause issues. Many manufactured router table fences don't fit tightly around the bit, leaving enough space for the work to fall into, so to speak. The inexpensive push pads with non slip rubber surfaces are good. With router bit set ups that remove material from the complete surface, you need an offset outfeed fence to compensate, like a jointers outfeed table. In many router operations, you make incremental cuts, not full depth cuts. A big bite can send work flying.

Last edited by Hammer1; 05-09-2013 at 09:05 AM.
Hammer1 is offline  
post #6 of 10 Old 05-09-2013, 01:35 PM Thread Starter
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Nov 2011
Location: Queensbury, NY
Posts: 272
View Upstate's Photo Album My Photos
Well, here's a few pics, with the scrap pine I was using, and some dried blood... Obviously it happened so fast, that I can never be sure of exactly what happened. But I don't have a good insert for the router table with that size bit, I have one that's just a hair too small, and one that's too big, so I think the board tipped into the hole slightly as it was passing through, caught it, and "bad things" happened. I feel like a "zero clearance" insert on the table would have avoided this, but I don't think such a thing exists/is even possible? I did attach a zero clearance fence for the cut.



The router bit me, now its time to reevaluate the safety of my shop-image-509278903.jpg



The router bit me, now its time to reevaluate the safety of my shop-image-2272120472.jpg

Looking back, I should have attached a board to the trailing edge to give me a longer piece to press against the table.
Upstate is offline  
post #7 of 10 Old 05-09-2013, 02:36 PM
where's my table saw?
 
woodnthings's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2009
Location: SE, Michigan
Posts: 27,001
View woodnthings's Photo Album My Photos
Here's a setup I used

I used 2 pair of Bench Dog hold downs and a push stick.
http://www.woodworkingtalk.com/f7/ro...project-23855/


The answer to your question will only be as detailed and specific as the question is detailed and specific. Good questions also include a sketch or a photo that illustrates your issue. (:< D)
woodnthings is online now  
The Following User Says Thank You to woodnthings For This Useful Post:
thegrgyle (05-09-2013)
post #8 of 10 Old 05-09-2013, 04:05 PM
Junior Member
 
Join Date: Oct 2012
Location: North Carolina
Posts: 14
View Day in Paradise's Photo Album My Photos
OUCH !!!!!!!!!!!!!!. Get well soon
Day in Paradise is offline  
post #9 of 10 Old 05-10-2013, 05:34 AM
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Jul 2009
Posts: 479
View Billy De's Photo Album My Photos
As Bill said hind sight is 20/ 20 and I hope I dont come off sounding like a smart @ss because I`m not trying to be one but you must understand when using a miter bit that the idea is to create a feather edge on the end of the piece.

Once you do this there is no bearing edge on the piece, forward of the cutting bit this mean it can and will tip.

To stop this from being a problem placing a off cut of wood on the top of the fence and fastening it to the piece with two clamps transfers the bearing face from the table to the fence and allows you to get a very fine edge on the piece and carry out the operation in safety.

Hope you heal quickly and get back on that horse. Billy
Billy De is offline  
post #10 of 10 Old 05-10-2013, 08:44 AM
Junior Member
 
gearupflapsup's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2013
Posts: 11
View gearupflapsup's Photo Album My Photos
You might try using double edge tape to secure a scrap piece opposite the face being routed.

This gives support against the fence as the feather edge is cut.

I just learned this, having completed some bedposts.

Hope it works out.
M
gearupflapsup is offline  
Reply

Quick Reply
Message:
Options

Register Now



In order to be able to post messages on the Woodworking Talk - Woodworkers Forum forums, you must first register.
Please enter your desired user name, your email address and other required details in the form below.

User Name:
Password
Please enter a password for your user account. Note that passwords are case-sensitive.

Password:


Confirm Password:
Email Address
Please enter a valid email address for yourself.

Email Address:
OR

Log-in










Thread Tools
Show Printable Version Show Printable Version
Email this Page Email this Page
Display Modes
Linear Mode Linear Mode



Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Criminals around your shop / shop safety - security... OnealWoodworking Shop Safety 12 06-08-2013 05:20 PM
Shop safety poster Hubbard Shop Safety 1 06-13-2012 08:51 AM
Can we talk about shop safety? woodnthings Shop Safety 13 07-19-2011 06:53 AM
router table safety apprentice Shop Safety 18 09-26-2010 08:08 AM
shop safety Bruce B Shop Safety 12 10-23-2007 06:12 PM

Posting Rules  
You may post new threads
You may post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off

 
For the best viewing experience please update your browser to Google Chrome