Let's see some damage. - Page 26 - Woodworking Talk - Woodworkers Forum
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post #501 of 520 Old 04-24-2016, 05:42 AM
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By the way.. About 3 weeks ago I learned that a nice sharp 1" chisel can suddenly and abruptly become not so nice and it's much funner to get stitched up by a really pretty doctor even if she's not the best surgeon on the planet.. I went back to chopping mortises the next day and here about 3 weeks later I'm healing up pretty good.



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Impressive, huh?
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post #502 of 520 Old 04-30-2016, 04:51 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by VIFmike
Here is an update on my thumb. As stated above on Jan 24 I almost cut it off completely. It was severed from the inside (palm) out from putting my hand down onto the blade grabbing a board falling off the back of the table saw. There was only a little muscle and skin holding it on. The bone was cut clean though. All blood vessels, muscles and tendons were cut as well. I had a 7 hour surgery the next morning and was in the hospital 4 days. The day I got out I built an out feed table one handed. I also re aligned and installed the guard and bought a better push stick. I also instituted a new rule in the shop of not talking to anyone at the saw while the saw is on. As of today I have 80% movement in the thumb. I still have some swelling and I can't bend the very end joint much yet. I can move the rest of it all around and pick up stuff. I am not able to pick up heavy stuff with it yet. I have feeling in the palm side and around it about 60% of the diameter. The feeling is still tingly like when your hand goes to sleep and as it's waking it tingles when you touch it. But I am now and have been able to do my regular work in the shop. I just have to change some of the ways I do each job. I should have full feeling and movement eventually. I can also touch the thumb to all fingers. These pics are from today. The wrinkles are from the coban bandage I keep it wrapped in to keep swelling down.
Wow glad to see the healing progress. I had a run in with my table saw in December of 13. I haves post in this thread about it too. Mine is healed as much as it's going to be but i still have the tingly sensation. Not horrible but reaching for screws or other small sharp things feels pretty uncomfortable. I hope you heal all the way and cancer back to business as usual!

Why buy it for $7 when you can make it yourself for $92 in craft supplies
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post #503 of 520 Old 05-01-2016, 04:19 PM
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I nabbed my index finger with the table saw last winter. It's healed up pretty well, but the one side of that finger will probably always feel a slight pain. It didn't help that just as it began to really heal I smacked it with a mallet good and hard which left what I believe is a permanent dent in the nail. All I could do then was cuss a lot and wait for the pain to stop.
Glad you were able to keep your thumb. Being thumbless would blow..

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Impressive, huh?
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post #504 of 520 Old 04-17-2017, 02:28 AM
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Been Hurt Many Times Over the Years!

Having worked in Construction all my life (65 yrs.)and have hurt myself many times as a electrician and have lost count of the cuts, smashed fingers, multiple shocks falling from stuff ect. Saying all that I still have all my fingers! BUT I had my first kick back from a table saw and that did me a number!! I was trimming a small 45% angle off a piece oak about 3 inches wide and a foot long. Had the cut almost done when the little 1/2 inch triangle 12" long shot off the table saw. I now know what happen but not then. That blade grabbed that little piece of wood and shot it striate at my pointer finger on my left hand. It broke my finger in haft and the bone was sticking out with a compound fracture. I reset the bone right then cause I knew it would hurt way more later doing it. Took 13+ stiches to close it up again and a metal finger brace till it healed. This scared the crap out of me I will never stand in front or behind a table saw again using it!! Now that finger does not work as good and it is crooked looking. I will be putting a splitter on my saw knowing what it is for now. These power saws can wipe you out in a micro second! I am learning fast about this wood stuff! I did it on a real cheap table saw. Now I have a 3 HP one to watch out using.
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post #505 of 520 Old 04-17-2017, 09:47 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Willy-N View Post
Having worked in Construction all my life (65 yrs.)and have hurt myself many times as a electrician and have lost count of the cuts, smashed fingers, multiple shocks falling from stuff ect. Saying all that I still have all my fingers! BUT I had my first kick back from a table saw and that did me a number!! I was trimming a small 45% angle off a piece oak about 3 inches wide and a foot long. Had the cut almost done when the little 1/2 inch triangle 12" long shot off the table saw. I now know what happen but not then. That blade grabbed that little piece of wood and shot it striate at my pointer finger on my left hand. It broke my finger in haft and the bone was sticking out with a compound fracture. I reset the bone right then cause I knew it would hurt way more later doing it. Took 13+ stiches to close it up again and a metal finger brace till it healed. This scared the crap out of me I will never stand in front or behind a table saw again using it!! Now that finger does not work as good and it is crooked looking. I will be putting a splitter on my saw knowing what it is for now. These power saws can wipe you out in a micro second! I am learning fast about this wood stuff! I did it on a real cheap table saw. Now I have a 3 HP one to watch out using.
Good grief, that was one serious kickback. No one will ever have to tell you to watch that saw again. You are right, one second you are fine, the next second you are hurt, well actually it doesn't hurt right that moment but it will.

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post #506 of 520 Old 06-13-2017, 04:55 PM
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That sounds very painfull. And I am a big fan of spending more money and be safe, then safe a little bit money and get injured. Money isn't worth your safety!
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post #507 of 520 Old 04-20-2020, 09:09 PM
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Moved here from another thread, this seems like a more appropriate thread for this content.

Here's one I never would have expected, I had the shaper head on the table saw and when I got to the end of the stock it changed depth as it went from the table to the throat plate. All was fine as long as the stock was pressed down on the infeed side of the table but as the end left the table and moved forward onto the throat plate the tone of the saw changed and I knew something was wrong, the stock was no longer well supported, it shifted and the shaper head grabbed it and threw it backwards, all in an instant.

I never stand behind, always to one side so it didn't hit me. I was wearing saftey glasses so my eyes are OK. I always use a push stick so my right hand didn't get anywhere near the blade. My left hand, unfortunately, was resting on the guard with the tip of my thumb hanging over pushing down slightly on the stock as it went through.

The force of the board as it was thrown upwards and back, split my thumb wide open and took a chunk out. My thumb never touched the blade, (a Saw Stop would not have provided any protection) my thumb literally split along the edge of the guard as it was bent backwards.

The white stuff on my thumb is crazy glue, there was no way I was going to Emergency in the middle of a pandemic so as I pressed the two halves of my thumb back together my wife dried off the skin and glued it back together, same with the little divit, she dropped a drop of glue into it and it stopped bleeding. So far so good.

The lesson is to think of the board going all the way through, this all started out fine but I didn't anticipate the problem at the end. I'll probably dry run boards all the way through the saw from now on whenever I have any kind of shaper head or attachment installed.

I hope this post will keep this from happening to anyone else.
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Last edited by JayArr; 04-20-2020 at 09:27 PM.
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post #508 of 520 Old 04-20-2020, 09:25 PM
where's my table saw?
 
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Yikes!

Just to be clear, here's what you said:
Here's one I never would have expected, I had the shaper head on the table saw and when I got to the end of the stock it changed depth as it went from the table to the blade guard. All was fine as long as the stock was pressed down on the infeed side of the table but as the end left the table and moved forward onto the blade guard the tone of the saw changed and I knew something was wrong, the stock was no longer well supported, it shifted and the shaper head grabbed it and threw it backwards, all in an instant.

I think you mean throat plate, not blade guard.... right?
The stock is never supported by the blade guard, but is supported by the throat plate on the infeed and outfeed sides.

The answer to your question will only be as detailed and specific as the question is detailed and specific. Good questions also include a sketch or a photo that illustrates your issue. (:< D)
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post #509 of 520 Old 04-20-2020, 09:27 PM
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Yes, correct, I used the wrong term, I'll edit that.
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post #510 of 520 Old 04-27-2020, 08:34 PM
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I went back out to the wood shop on Saturday and set the table saw up to make a cut. The amount of fear I had to fight through was viceral, something in my mind was screaming not to do this, run away, you're going to get hurt. blood pumping like crazy, thumb throbbing, sweating, I actually left the shop several times and had to force myself to turn around in the yard and go back in. This was all before I turned the saw on! I was scared so ****less that I put the guard back onto the saw... that guard hasn't been on the saw since I unpacked it 18 years ago. While I was cutting the board the sound of the saw changed and I panicked and shut it off to inspect. Of course, there was nothing wrong, it just makes a different sound with the guard on and after I forced myself to continue I got it cut. Then I made a few more cuts on the RAS and came back to the table saw and made a second cut with it and the fear was less than half the first time. I think I'll be able to flatten the fear out so that the wood shop is a happy place again if I just keep cutting.
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post #511 of 520 Old 04-27-2020, 10:08 PM
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Tips about the molding cutter in a table saw......

The molding cutter takes an much bigger bite, more material than the table saw blade, so it requires a different approach. You need some hold downs like these:
https://www.google.com/search?q=Boar...w=1536&bih=728


I would also make several depth passes rather than a single one. It has more potential for kickback than a single table saw blade for the above reason. The throat plate must be flush with the table surface.
A pusher block that hold the work down as well as pushes it forward like this:
https://www.google.com/search?q=diy+...=firefox-b-1-d


Push "sticks" are not enough, they can't push down with enough pressure. You need two of them to make them work where as well as a push block:



The answer to your question will only be as detailed and specific as the question is detailed and specific. Good questions also include a sketch or a photo that illustrates your issue. (:< D)
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post #512 of 520 Old 04-27-2020, 11:19 PM
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It's a typical story Woodnthings, I do have board buddys and I have feather boards mounted in T-Tracks but they are both set up on the RAS because that's where I normally run the shaper head. I've got the proper guard for it and have made the special fence and I don't have any trouble at all over on that saw. (I've even purchased a small power feeder to install for future runs)

Beechcraft was asking if he could use knife 3212 in the Craftsman head to make batton molding on his table saw to match his existing house trim. I checked my stock of knives and had knife 3212 and a half hour before dinner so I thought I would run a quick sample, take a picture and let him decide if it was close enough to warrant buying the tool. I didn't think it through, it was supposed to be a quick 10 minute job to create a sample to help him out.If I was going to make 200 feet of it I would have thought about it, made a pot of coffee, puttered around the shop figuring out how it would all work and I probably would have noticed the danger. I am a victim of my own haste.
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post #513 of 520 Old 04-28-2020, 02:07 AM
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Jay, I'm still trying to figure out what happened ....

In the previous post you stated:
I never stand behind, always to one side so it didn't hit me. I was wearing saftey glasses so my eyes are OK. I always use a push stick so my right hand didn't get anywhere near the blade. My left hand, unfortunately, was resting on the guard with the tip of my thumb hanging over pushing down slightly on the stock as it went through.

The force of the board as it was thrown upwards and back, split my thumb wide open and took a chunk out. My thumb never touched the blade, (a Saw Stop would not have provided any protection) my thumb literally split along the edge of the guard as it was bent backwards.


Was there indeed a guard on the saw when you were using the molding head/cutter? I have never used my molding head with the factory guard on the saw, and actually I don't use a factory guard any longer at all. Also the splitter on my old saw needs to be removed when using the molding head.


I also don't understand why the saw sounded different as the end of the workpiece traveled onto the throat plate.... which should be flush and have a smooth transistion from the table surface. What was different in your case? These details may seem trivial, but would be really important in a "lesson learned" for folks here who may want to use their molding head exactly like you did. I will also say, that your attempt to help out another member here by making a "quick and dirty" sample was a very noble and gratious gesture that I can identify with as well.

The answer to your question will only be as detailed and specific as the question is detailed and specific. Good questions also include a sketch or a photo that illustrates your issue. (:< D)
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post #514 of 520 Old 04-28-2020, 11:58 AM
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OK, to clarify, the guard was not on at the time, you can't use the guard with the shaper head.

I keep trying but I still can't remember all the way through the incident, there's a period of time that I can't properly recall (just black) but I can remember just up to and just after. Some things I thought at first don't look right anymore so it's confusing to me too.

It also looks like I'm prone to using the wrong terms, I should have said my left hand was on the FENCE, my saw has an aluminum one about 1 1/2 - 2" wide. My hand was on the fence with my thumb hanging over the edge on top of the stock. I was trying to hold the stock down with my thumb on the outfeed side while the rest of my hand rested on the fence.

I sketched the setup and took a pic, to use the shaper I put the dado blade throat plate on the saw as instructed by Sears.

The stock was thinner than the opening in the throat plate, only 3/4". So the first five inches I fed into the shaper head were unsupported except for the pressure I was putting on the trailing end to hold it to the table. I didn't notice this while I was doing it, it felt fine and was cutting OK.

What I think happened is that at the point marked "loss of support" there was no longer anything holding the last 5" of stock up off the head. At this point my push stick was pushing a piece of stock into a shaper head instead of past it. The stock likely tilted down in and the knife gouged into it and threw it.

A board buddy on the outfeed side would have kept it level and I could have pushed it through with a scrap piece but that would involve cutting into the scrap piece as well.

I don't think there is a safe way to use the shaper head on stock less than 1" wide on a table saw, it will always be able to fall into the throat plate opening required for the knife.

I don't have this problem on the RAS at all, the head is horizontal so the cut is on the side of the stock adjacent to the side on the table, I can feed door trim that is only 1/2" thick past the head with it's 2" flat side down and it works just fine.
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post #515 of 520 Old 05-13-2020, 01:07 PM
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Thumb is healing nicely.
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post #516 of 520 Old 06-20-2020, 08:32 AM
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My lastest goof. yesterday on the bandsaw.
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Regards, Pat
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post #517 of 520 Old 06-20-2020, 08:53 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Willy-N View Post
.......................... I will be putting a splitter on my saw knowing what it is for now. These power saws can wipe you out in a micro second! I am learning fast about this wood stuff! I did it on a real cheap table saw. Now I have a 3 HP one to watch out using.
Dont expect much safety out of real cheap tools. Safety is compromised in cheap inferior tools and yet we still expect it to perform. Unfortunately you learned the hard way.

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post #518 of 520 Old 06-20-2020, 09:12 AM
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Youtube is one of the best places to learn how to make things. It is also the worse place to learn good safety practices. We see these guys just whipping through table saws and routers and no concern for safety. It is best to read the tool manual's safety section as well as using common sense. Might even be a good idea to watch and critique some of these guys. Maybe even post your critique with a link.
I notices many woodworkers on you tube wearing gloves. Any loose fitting items especially one that extends your digits, like gloves, are a definite NO NO. Why do so mant of them wear gloves? Could it be that an unusual amount of people with some form of dermatitis are all drawn to woodworking? Or could it be they are hiding something, like an obvious injury?. No tellin'.
Safety should not come by accident. Losing a digit or two, or even a partial loss should not be just 'part of' woodworking.

You dont need to wear full body armor to be safe, but do wear what is necessary for the task at hand. Usually, right before an accident occurs, you say to yourself "self. I ought not to be doing this this way." that is when you should stop immediately and take the necessary precautions.

I havent looked up actual statistics but I would guess that most accidents are from laziness, fatigue and just wanting to 'git 'er done'
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post #519 of 520 Old 06-20-2020, 02:35 PM
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Allow me to share an unexpected injury that happened to me three weeks ago. I was NOT seriously injured, but very annoyed.

I removed the plastic base on a Makita RT0701CX7 Compact Router Kit and was attaching a circle cutting jig. While attaching the jig, I noticed blood dripping over everything, so I stopped and took care of the first aid. It was not just a cut. Part of the fingernail and small chunk of the fingertip had been cleanly sliced off. I did not feel a thing when it happened. The wound had me baffled because the router was not plugged in and the router bits were in the cabinet.

-> Simply put, the machined edges of the bases on the Makita RT0701CX7 Compact Router Kit are razor sharp.

Lesson learned:
Handle your router bases the same way you handle blades.


Photo:
Makita RT0701CX7 Compact Router aluminum plunge base, partially exposed. Every straight and curved edge on that base is ultra sharp. Sorry, I have no photos of the injury. It healed fairly quickly and the fingernail grew out normally.
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post #520 of 520 Old 06-20-2020, 09:05 PM
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Thanks for the heads up. Glad the injury was not significant.
I have had that happen to me on various other items. Many moons ago I was moving my either washer or dryer, dont remember which, but I slashed my hand pretty good on the bottom sheet metal.
In both cases, it was probably a cost cutting thing at the factory. No one can see it so why bother smoothing things out.

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