Injury Warning!!! - Woodworking Talk - Woodworkers Forum
 
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post #1 of 18 Old 09-17-2009, 09:14 AM Thread Starter
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Injury Warning!!!

We've read a lot about kickback, and other than using good operating sense, there can be those times that just happen. But, this warning has to do with splinters.

I'm mentioning splinters during table saw use as some of my worst injuries have come from the edges of plywood and lumber while cutting on the table saw. Just handling the sheet to the table and manipulating your hands on the sheet to make a pass can catch a loose splinter and drive it deeply into your hand. I've had it happen with chunks so large it pinned my hand to the material. They can be long and sharp. With hardwoods, they are long grain and very stiff and sharp.

Care has to be taken when sliding your hands along the edges of material. Wearing leather gloves may help, but I find that gloves can be a detraction. You may feel gloves create a doubt that they compromise your "feel" during the procedure and may not be safe to wear.






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post #2 of 18 Old 09-17-2009, 11:32 AM
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CB,
I feel your pain. I am always digging out splinters, especially from plywood edges. I usually don't wear gloves, and I always seem to forget not to slide my hands along the edges. Cedar and wenge are probably some of my most notorious splinter woods. Very fine and irritating if you don't get them out.
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post #3 of 18 Old 09-17-2009, 12:37 PM
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To me Gloves / loose clothing and rotating blades / bits are a bigger potential disaster!!!
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post #4 of 18 Old 09-17-2009, 09:24 PM
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I just got a 1" long metal sliver while doing a metal stud job today. The sliver came from the knockout holes for conduit to run it. I'll say that it stung quite a bit, since it went in right at the knuckle on the bottom of my index finger.

I also still have a large one in my scalp from about 5 years ago. I was walking around a house that I was framing and one of my guys dropped a small 2x12 jack rafter with a 12/12 pitch cut on it. Well it hit me right on the top of the head and the tip broke off into about 5 pieces IN my scalp. Most of the pieces came out over a period of 3 months, but one is still there and scabs up quite often. The doctor said that if the body doesn't reject them it will accept them and break them down over time. I guess doug fir takes some time for the body to break down.
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post #5 of 18 Old 09-17-2009, 10:23 PM
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Mike, I agree w/ you about wenge for sure, and lacewood is another one that's just as bad --- not as easy to get splinters as from wenge but really bad when you do get them.

Paul

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post #6 of 18 Old 09-18-2009, 06:42 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by cabinetman View Post
Wearing leather gloves may help, but I find that gloves can be a detraction. You may feel gloves create a doubt that they compromise your "feel" during the procedure and may not be safe to wear.

I wear a pair that has a pigskin leather plam and a stretchy fabric back with a velcro strap at the wrist. They fit very snug(almost like a second skin once broken in) with no extra bits or fold to hang up, and the thin leather provides lots of feel. I don't wear them to assemble or such, but they go on when handling the rough stuff. Do you really need a fine touch when running wood through a planer or using the tablesaw?

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post #7 of 18 Old 09-19-2009, 11:09 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by mdlbldrmatt135 View Post
To me Gloves / loose clothing and rotating blades / bits are a bigger potential disaster!!!
I have the same reluctance, but I know some very experience woodworkers that wear thin skin tight leather gloves, especially when squaring rough cut. I worn skin tight leather gloves yet, but have been considering it.

Rich (The Yooper)
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post #8 of 18 Old 11-17-2009, 07:25 PM
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Splinters

I know I've gotten my share of splinters sliding my hands on a piece of cut stock. I notice that softening the edge with a piece of fine sandpaper will usually lessen the possibility of a splinter somewhat. I also use gloves when moving sheetgoods in my shop. With their weight, sometimes they slip and that's when the wood says "gotcha". I have a buddy who works in a hospital and got me syringe tips that have a cutting edge on them. They have worked out great for help getting splinters out, becuase you can actually cut the skin, rather than trying to literally dig them out.
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post #9 of 18 Old 11-22-2009, 09:16 AM
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I remember as a kid , my Dad working with plywood . He had a splinter under his finger nail on his pointer , index finger , go right up to the second knuckle and out of the shin , freaked me out . It has always stuck in my mind, one of those things you don't forget, as a kid . ( maybe I needed therapy )..lol.. He had to go to the hospital to freeze it to be removed . He always said it was the most painful thing ever happen to him . I guess it had to be the glues in the ply that stung so much . Ever since then I'm so careful with plywood. I don't think O would wear gloves , no feeling around blades and bits .

I can't believe I still have all my fingers
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post #10 of 18 Old 11-22-2009, 02:04 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by cabinetman View Post
We've read a lot about kickback, and other than using good operating sense, there can be those times that just happen. But, this warning has to do with splinters.

I'm mentioning splinters during table saw use as some of my worst injuries have come from the edges of plywood and lumber while cutting on the table saw. Just handling the sheet to the table and manipulating your hands on the sheet to make a pass can catch a loose splinter and drive it deeply into your hand. I've had it happen with chunks so large it pinned my hand to the material. They can be long and sharp. With hardwoods, they are long grain and very stiff and sharp.

Care has to be taken when sliding your hands along the edges of material. Wearing leather gloves may help, but I find that gloves can be a detraction. You may feel gloves create a doubt that they compromise your "feel" during the procedure and may not be safe to wear.








I will echo your thoughts on those LARGE splinters. I once got one into my hand so deep that my next door neighbor (an AF Colonel head of the emergency room at the base hospital) could not pull it out without taking me into the emergency room. We were geting ready for a hurricane and I was taking down plywood WITHOUT USING GLOVES. My dumb.

Think safety folks.

G
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post #11 of 18 Old 11-26-2009, 01:59 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by cabinetman View Post
.......I'm mentioning splinters as some of my worst injuries have come from the edges of plywood and lumber. Just handling the sheet to the table and manipulating your hands on the sheet to make a pass can catch a loose splinter and drive it deeply into your hand. ..........Wearing leather gloves may help, but I find that gloves can be a detraction. You may feel gloves create a doubt that they compromise your "feel" during the procedure and may not be safe to wear.


Interesting thread. I for one dont like gloves and therefore have to put up with the consequences at home and in my shop. I never did like them because I lose my sense of touch. We have to wear gloves at work no matter who I am contracting with so I just have to do it. We must put our gloves on before we leave the living quarters and walk outside even though we have not yet reached our work area. Depending on which company I contract with, some give us the option of removing our gloves to climb the steel ladders with the small round or diamond shaped rungs.

Tony B



Retired woodworker, amongst other things, Sold full time cruising boat and now full time cruising in RV. Currently in Somerville, Tx
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post #12 of 18 Old 12-12-2009, 06:02 PM
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A guy that worked for me one summer, kid actually, wore a pair of batting gloves on the job. He got me a pair that fit me and I now have several pair. They fit snug and are thin leather. They are not bulky nor do they hinder the feel of what you are handling. You'd have to try it to see what I mean.

It depends on what I'm doing as I don't always have them on. I still get a splinter on occasion but that's because I forgot the gloves.

Last edited by Shamus; 12-12-2009 at 06:05 PM.
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post #13 of 18 Old 03-03-2010, 01:30 PM
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I dont wear glove but thin tight fitting ones may work fine.I would be tempted to cut a couple of the fingers off the gloves tho.As advice for beginners-never wear long sleeves when operating machines because those long sleeves may pull you into the blade or drill press,lathe ect.Itchy
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post #14 of 18 Old 03-03-2010, 02:35 PM
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I just cant seem to get the control and feel I need when operating machines while wearing gloves.

I guess I am destined to sliding my hand along an edge and blurting out those familiar four letter words.... even after all theese years!

You'd think a guy would learn...........hasn't happened yet!
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post #15 of 18 Old 03-03-2010, 04:35 PM
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I use those tight fitting stretchy rubber / elastic type gloves when using machines like the table saw, jointer, planer, etc. The fit tight to your skin and still give a great "feel" with respect to the machines, etc. I've sliced my hands enough with the edges of freshly planed hard maple enough times to just instinctively grab them now. Even a donkey doesn't stumble over the same rock twice.

They are very similar to the link below but not quite as expensive. I think I paid $20 for a dozen the last time. They do wear out but they are cheap and do a great job of light duty protection.

http://industrial.gloves-online.com/WK-C874

When I'm moving materials from the truck to the shop I use close fitting thin leather gloves.
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post #16 of 18 Old 03-14-2010, 05:52 PM
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Being a framer most of my life and still active my hands are still pretty tough, most of the splinters I get when I do are on the top side of my hands or under the finger nails. The palms of my hands are still callosed and repel most splinters.

The worst splinters I ever got were from R Cedar, Fir and pressure treated SYP.

I'd be worried about getting something snagged on or in gloves that might prevent me from pulling away fast enough.
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post #17 of 18 Old 03-15-2010, 02:39 AM
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Cedar slivers are the easiest to deal with. Cedar has a toxin in it and they will swell up. Sleep on it and they 'pop' right out in the morning.
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post #18 of 18 Old 03-16-2010, 11:52 PM
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I don't wear gloves around highspeed rotating things. I have seen what happens when they catch and tangle.
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