How to use a jointer - Woodworking Talk - Woodworkers Forum
 
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post #1 of 14 Old 02-15-2015, 03:51 PM Thread Starter
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How to use a jointer

I haven't used a jointer in forever. Not too long ago someone I knew stuck their hand into one somehow. I haven't had much interest in the jointer since then. I need one now though and I've got my dad's little old Craftsman 4-1/8" jointer/planer to use.

Are there any safety tips or tricks that I should be aware of? What do you need to get good results?
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post #2 of 14 Old 02-15-2015, 03:54 PM
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How to use a jointer

Use a push pads. Set the table to take light cuts, and feed the piece slow. If it doesn't feel right don't do it.
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post #3 of 14 Old 02-15-2015, 04:05 PM
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Check YouTube.

A video is 100 times better at explaining safe operating technique.
Not only to show you wear and how to hold the stock safely, but it'll help you use it smarter to get better results.

Make sure you use push pads. If you don't want to make a set, they do sell pretty nice ones with rubber padding for grip.
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post #4 of 14 Old 02-15-2015, 05:51 PM
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Assuming you just want the jointer to edge joint wood there is no mystery to being safe with it. Make sure you always joint wood that is a foot long or longer and wide enough you can hold on to it. You won't need push pads for edge jointing wood. In the event you do face joint wood don't take off too much wood per pass. Rather than use push pads I prefer to use a push block like this one. I got some push pads with a jointer I bought and the second or third time I used them they slipped so I threw them away.
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post #5 of 14 Old 02-15-2015, 06:46 PM
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Even when the objective is edge jointing, I make at least one very light face pass to be sure that the face of the wood is flat. For this operation I do like the "store botten" pads.

The key to good work is has been said. Slow speed and small bites. I will add even pressure. Even on the infeed and outfeed sides.

George
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post #6 of 14 Old 02-16-2015, 08:02 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Hartlus View Post
I haven't used a jointer in forever. Not too long ago someone I knew stuck their hand into one somehow. I haven't had much interest in the jointer since then. I need one now though and I've got my dad's little old Craftsman 4-1/8" jointer/planer to use.

Are there any safety tips or tricks that I should be aware of? What do you need to get good results?
don't join wood on the end's only long grain, and i keep my fingers curled up and not pointing at the knives , if the wood is not like at least 2" wide or tall on the bed i would use push handle's of some kind , thicker than that i doin't but that is me, been doing this for 50 or so yrs , a little more experence, just be careful and you will be ok , just thin cuts , now joining wood on the flat use push stick all the time
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post #7 of 14 Old 02-16-2015, 08:44 AM
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set it up correctly

That means sharpen the knives if possible or replace them. That's intimidating for some, but there are videos on You Tube to show you how.

Set the fence at 90 degrees to the table.

Make sure the guard is working properly and will return on it's own.

Run a straight edge from the outfeed table to the front or infeed table and see what the depth of cut is. It should be 1/16" . Raise the infeed table if it's more than that.

Have a push block with a "hook" handy, like the one Steve posted above. Push pads with "grippy" bottoms should be cleaned with lacquer thinner first to remove any residue, so they will infact grip.

If all that is OK, then proceed as follows:

Lay your work on a flat surface to see if it rocks. If it has a slight twist it will rock slightly, so be prepared to hold it at a constant angle when you first start out.

Think of the jointer as a powered hand "plane". You want to remove material where it is not needed by planing that portion away, thereby flattening the surface. It's OK to partially plane from one end , turn the piece around and plane in from the other end.
Make marks with chalk if your progress is difficult to read in the wood.

Face joint your work first to get a flat surface on one side. Don't start with a board that is less than 18" long. Run the board into the cutter slowly and listen to what is happening. It may sound like it's cutting off in some places and not in others. That's OK, you are flattening the surface.

Once that surface is flat, you can edge joint one edge by holding the flat surface against the fence and feed the edge into the cutters. Keep a constant pressure against the fence and feed slowly.

The whole point of jointing (straightening and flattening) a board is to prepare it for either the table saw or the thickness planer which is the next operation.

You should NEVER run a crooked or twisted board on the tablesaw since it can twist or shift, jam and cause a kickback.

The answer to your question will only be as detailed and specific as the question is detailed and specific. Good questions also include a sketch or a photo that illustrates your issue. (:< D)
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post #8 of 14 Old 02-16-2015, 02:50 PM
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Don't poke the spinney bits

I need cheaper hobby
etsy.com/shop/projectepicfail
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post #9 of 14 Old 02-21-2015, 03:53 PM
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I taught woodworking to high school students for 22 years and never had an accident. All the suggestions here are valuable. My input is simple,visualize the jointing process from start to finish. Our class moto was " in with ten out with ten" ( fingers that is). Another option is to find someone in your area to teach you the proper methods of safely using a jointer. Cheers
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post #10 of 14 Old 03-05-2015, 12:35 AM Thread Starter
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Thanks for the tips and advice. I wasn't sure that I was going to need the jointer but when I did I felt pretty good about it.

It's always good to know what the safe practices are. People often think that they can do something that they know is dangerous as long as they are careful. They focus on the area, or zone of danger unaware that they have created another danger region. That's what I think when I see pictures of sleeves, ties, and hair pulled into some piece of machinery. I can think of three people I know that have lost fingers. None of them thought that they had put their fingers in danger. They thought they were being safe.

I need to make one of those shoes.
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post #11 of 14 Old 03-05-2015, 05:49 AM
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Some videos are good and some should be banned for life.

Besides knowing when to use push pads and when not so necessary, learning how to apply pressure, when, where and how much is mostly a learned skill. After some basic instruction that comes with practice. Learn to relax just a bit when running power equipment and allow it to do its job. If an operator is tense, the when, where and too much pressure in the wrong direction is more likely.

Last edited by SeniorSitizen; 03-05-2015 at 05:56 AM.
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post #12 of 14 Old 03-05-2015, 06:19 AM
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I remember the jointer demonstration in high school shop class. The teacher was running a narrow piece through and had his finger gliding along the side right on the table. Next thing you know we see blood splatter and he turns white. Took the tip of his index finger off. He was an older experienced teacher too. I guess he was too relaxed that day.
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post #13 of 14 Old 03-05-2015, 06:33 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by peridigm View Post
I remember the jointer demonstration in high school shop class. The teacher was running a narrow piece through and had his finger gliding along the side right on the table. Next thing you know we see blood splatter and he turns white. Took the tip of his index finger off. He was an older experienced teacher too. I guess he was too relaxed that day.
Possibly a difference between slightly relaxed and complacent?
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post #14 of 14 Old 03-06-2015, 06:30 AM
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