How Many Light Fixtures Do You Need ? - Page 2 - Woodworking Talk - Woodworkers Forum
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post #21 of 40 Old 05-05-2013, 03:29 AM Thread Starter
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Quote:
Originally Posted by mengtian View Post
I have 4 T12 sets of lights (2 bulbs in each set), 40 W. I think I need two more sets. I work out of my 2 car garage which is painted beige, concrete floor, no windows.
Do they still manufactor T12 bulbs ? I see they still sell them. Thought I heard that they were being phased out of production like incandescents because of their inefficiency.

Last edited by against_the_grain; 05-06-2013 at 11:16 AM.
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post #22 of 40 Old 05-07-2013, 04:17 PM
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T8's are brighter than T12's and cost less to operate.... They also have an electronic starter instead of a ballast .... You can mount them against the ceiling because they don't get hot like T12's do..... Tubes are more expensive, though...
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post #23 of 40 Old 05-08-2013, 11:41 PM Thread Starter
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Bulb diameter sizes are identified by eights of an inch. T8 is short-hand for eight eighths . Or, 1 inch.

A T12 is 12 eights or 1 1/2" in diameter.

Besides lumens, color temperture is also an important consideration in choosing bulbs to light your shop.

Below is a photo showing differences in brightness and glare as it relates to color temperture.
Color temperture is measured in Kelvins and is designated as K.


The higher K (5500) fluorescent appears to have less glare and a softer light than the the 3500 K fluorescent.Both are 13 watts.

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post #24 of 40 Old 05-09-2013, 12:03 AM
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The "soft white" light bulbs that you're probably used to are normally around 3,000K to 4,000K. They have a yellow tint to them and have a way of making things feel older and "softer", like in Grandma's house. The higher color temperatures like "daylight white" around 5500K is a pure white light which often seems blue because people are used to the soft white bulbs and think that the yellow lights are actually white, skewing the perspective. My house has only the daylight white bulbs and if I don't open the blinds, I don't notice that the sun has set because the color doesn't change. With the soft white bulbs, you notice that it looks different after dark because you lose the white light and are only left with yellow lights.

If you haven't checked out the higher K lights, you should. The difference is very noticeable if you have a room with two light fixtures. Put the normal soft white in one, and daylight white in another. The daylight white almost feels harsher IMO, but it's definitely a more white light. You'll notice how yellow soft white is when you see the two side by side. The difference looks more dramatic than that pic in person.
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post #25 of 40 Old 08-31-2017, 03:37 AM
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Help

Help!
I tried the math for a 40 x 60 shop. Here is what I got.
40' x 60' = 2,400 square feet
2,400 sq ft x 70 lumens = 168,000 lumens
168,000 * 1.40 = 235,200 lumens
168,000 lumens + 235,200 lumens = 403,200 lumens
403,200 lumens / 4500 lumen output of each fixture = 89.6 fixtures (or 90)

This just doesn't seem right somehow?
What did I do wrong?
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post #26 of 40 Old 08-31-2017, 07:20 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by JGooch View Post
Help!
I tried the math for a 40 x 60 shop. Here is what I got.
40' x 60' = 2,400 square feet
2,400 sq ft x 70 lumens = 168,000 lumens
168,000 * 1.40 = 235,200 lumens
168,000 lumens + 235,200 lumens = 403,200 lumens
403,200 lumens / 4500 lumen output of each fixture = 89.6 fixtures (or 90)

This just doesn't seem right somehow?
What did I do wrong?
I don't know about the math of it. A shop that size I could make it work with six double light fixtures with 8' T12 bulbs.

If you had 90 bulbs in a building that size I think it would lite it up like daytime.
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post #27 of 40 Old 08-31-2017, 07:42 AM
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I have 17 780 lumen (13,260 total) daylight LED bulbs in my 12x22 (2,112 cf) shop. They are arranged in 4 foot diameter circles of coverage. I also have 4 300 watt incandescent floods for color balance finishing when I need them. Plenty bright for me.

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post #28 of 40 Old 08-31-2017, 11:09 AM
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My shop is 24X34 with 10' ceilings and I installed 3 11,000 lumen LED high bay shop lights http://www.homedepot.com/p/Lithonia-...L-MV/203812710 I have to wear a cap because it is so bright in there. I coiffured the ceiling down to 8' over the work benches and installed 4,000 lumen LED can lights on 1 side, and 3 dual LED floods on the other. The floods are adjusted to overlap and I have virtually no shadows. I wouldn't call it a cheap solution, but I expect the LEDs to last a very long time, they sip electricity, start in cold weather, and they do not add any extra heat. BTW, those high bays were $200 a piece 2 years ago. I might buy another one or two just because!

Last edited by CaptainMike; 08-31-2017 at 11:12 AM.
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post #29 of 40 Old 09-01-2017, 03:17 PM
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My thoughts are that you need enough light to see what you are doing, since we do different things in different areas the lighting has to be adjusted accordingly, particularly in a larger shop.

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post #30 of 40 Old 09-02-2017, 12:50 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Steve Neul View Post
I don't know about the math of it. A shop that size I could make it work with six double light fixtures with 8' T12 bulbs.

If you had 90 bulbs in a building that size I think it would lite it up like daytime.
Thanks! We were thinking about twelve 4' lights (each one 4500 lumens). I feel much better now about going that route based on your reply. My husband was even thinking we could get by with ten fixtures. But it's too late. I've already ordered the fixtures. If twelve ends up being too aggressive we can always scale back and save the extras for bench lights and lighting the lathe, etc.
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post #31 of 40 Old 09-02-2017, 06:38 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by JGooch View Post
Thanks! We were thinking about twelve 4' lights (each one 4500 lumens). I feel much better now about going that route based on your reply. My husband was even thinking we could get by with ten fixtures. But it's too late. I've already ordered the fixtures. If twelve ends up being too aggressive we can always scale back and save the extras for bench lights and lighting the lathe, etc.
What I'm going on is one of my buildings is 32'x42' and I'm lighting it with 4 eight foot fixtures. For your building I think 12 four foot fixtures would more evenly distribute the light.
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post #32 of 40 Old 09-02-2017, 09:05 AM
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I have 2 single-bulb receptacles in the ceiling of my garage/"shop". That wasn't enough light, so I put in a few of these kind of things. Problem solved. There are really fancy ones too, if you need more light or flexibility




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post #33 of 40 Old 09-02-2017, 02:54 PM
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According to all this, I am sorely de-lighted. I have two wall plugs and one ceiling pull chain socket and an extension cord plugged in a power strip for my bandsaw and drill press. No, I don't have all things running at one time so power isn't a problem. The problem is that the guy I bought the house from put sheetrock on the ceiling. Plus, when he finished the basement for homeschooling, he didn't add any extra circuits! These houses were built on the cheap- unfinished basement with FOUR outlets in the entire basement!
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post #34 of 40 Old 09-02-2017, 03:53 PM
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There are so many factors that go into determining the proper amount of lighting that it can not be summed up by lumens per square foot! As a starting point though I see nothing wrong with it. Light distribution has a huge affect on the results. Point source lamps VS lineal lamps with diffusers is a typical example. The surfaces that the light bounces off of have a big affect. How clean do you keep the lamps, they degrade with time so you need a bit more up front. Contrast of the work to the surroundings also affects your perception of the lighting.
My background: degree in architecture. The lighting section was taught by a man that worked in a big firm designing lighting. His presentations were superb and each demonstrated with real lighting utilizing a full blown theater setup. Heavily textured surfaces will absorb light rather than bounce it back. Black/dark, kills light. Color of the floor counts also. Watch out for the angle of incidence on task lighting, it can result in glare. A row of lights near a wall can give better distribution than if it is 10 feet away. Many things to consider.
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post #35 of 40 Old 09-10-2017, 11:11 AM
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Sheesh, I have (2) four foot LED fixtures that each have two rows of LEDs on ten foot ceilings. for a 12 x 16 area. Plenty of light. for most things. I have magnetic auxilliary lights to mount on the lathe or scroll saw. when working at night or with the barn door closed.
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post #36 of 40 Old 11-01-2017, 03:29 PM
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I needed less

I've a 16x24 workshop and I've 14 lamps at 3200 lumens each and I'm perfectly satisfied. Ceiling is 9ft high, walls and ceiling are drywall and painted a light blue/gray. By your reckoning I'd need 20.16 of my lights.

My lights by the way are: https://www.homedepot.com/p/Commerci...3161/205331022
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post #37 of 40 Old 11-01-2017, 11:52 PM
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I have a 1500 sf shop and have 150,000 lumens worth of light. I use T5-54w HO tubes. 18 of those lamps are over specific areas and about 8-12' off the floor. The other 12 are high bay fixtures, 2 with 6 bulbs each. They are at 16' off the floor. One thing to consider is, you do not work on the floor. You work on tables and they are usually 30-36" off the floor. So 8' off the floor becomes 5' from the table top.

When I'm not doing fine work I use the high bay fixtures. They are bright enough to be safe and to see well enough. I can't use them for fine work, my 55 yo eyes have a tough time focusing on fine details. I'll flip on the other lower lights when I need to see finer details.

Sometimes when doing precision work I'll have to put my old man glasses on and use a LED headlamp.

Coming in from the noontime sun into my fully lit shop and it seems dark. Coming inside from a dark outside and the lights are blinding bright. It's all relative.

In my spray room I have [email protected] T5-54w HO lamps and they are at 9' off the floor. It's more than bright enough in there, brighter than in the shop. It's 30% brighter than when I had the same amount of T12 75w bulbs.

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post #38 of 40 Old 12-12-2017, 05:57 PM
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I bought a bunch of goose-neck, swing-arm light fixtures in garage sales.
Now, I have a dedicated and focused 9W LED light for each power tool in the shop.

I have one much bigger LED light (45W) for room light.
Maybe this is a waste to light up all 4 corners of the room
where I have nothing but wood storage. Maybe not.

Over my wood carving bench, 2 9W LED lights. One is on a homebrewed 48" arm.
Two is good to use alternatively for the hard & sharp shadows to find uneven surfaces on the wood.
The light really needs to come from over my shoulder. From above or from the bench,
that means I'm always carving in shadow. Wrong.
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post #39 of 40 Old 12-20-2017, 05:09 PM
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Back again! Figure how many lights you need and add two more.
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post #40 of 40 Old 12-20-2017, 06:02 PM
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I wired my lighting circuit with half a dozen outlets in the ceiling and hung led shoplights wherever I needed, as well as plugging in the machine lights there so if any were left on they went out when the overheads were switched off. This leaves a lot of flexibility in my lighting so I can move a light easily to match any changes in equipment.
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