Glasses + respirator = fog! Arghhhhh! - Woodworking Talk - Woodworkers Forum
 
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post #1 of 15 Old 02-13-2012, 08:12 AM Thread Starter
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Glasses + respirator = fog! Arghhhhh!

Hi!

As you guys may suppose I use glasses with large lenses (not thick, large). Anyway, case is that my past experience with half-face respirators has been no good. The breath into the respirator produces an irritating fog in the glasses lenses (like in the windshield on rainy days) and it makes me to end removing and throwing the respirator to a shop corner after a few seconds using it.



It has not been a big deal so far, as I only do very small and quick wood jobs so I just have been getting rid of the respirator.



However now I decided to play woodworking seriously and dedicate more time on my shop, so I think that the respirator will be a must!

I would like to know how you glasses guys deal with this issue. There is any trick to make both glasses and respirators to live in harmony?



Thanks!
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post #2 of 15 Old 02-13-2012, 08:45 AM
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spit

to keep the scuba mask from fogging I spit on the lens, wipe it around, quick rinse and let dry. Don't know why, but it works. The scuba store also sells something in a bottle that you wipe on - antifog, defogger, nofog, something like that. I think it's being marketed to paintballers too.

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post #3 of 15 Old 02-13-2012, 11:11 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by joesbucketorust View Post
to keep the scuba mask from fogging I spit on the lens, wipe it around, quick rinse and let dry. Don't know why, but it works. The scuba store also sells something in a bottle that you wipe on - antifog, defogger, nofog, something like that. I think it's being marketed to paintballers too.
They make something like that for skiers/snowboarders too. I have the same issue when wearing dustmasks. I wonder....

Mike
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post #4 of 15 Old 02-13-2012, 02:13 PM Thread Starter
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Originally Posted by joesbucketorust View Post
to keep the scuba mask from fogging I spit on the lens, wipe it around, quick rinse and let dry. Don't know why, but it works. The scuba store also sells something in a bottle that you wipe on - antifog, defogger, nofog, something like that. I think it's being marketed to paintballers too.
Thanks!

I recall now that when I used to scuba diving SEVERAL years ago, my dad has told me to do the same thing (spit into the mask and rinse it). And I remember that it worked like a charm. Same principle!

I remember also that someone has told me once that cut a small potato in the middle and rub it in the glass does the same magic. I never had tried this last tip though.

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post #5 of 15 Old 02-14-2012, 08:07 PM
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Either you have a respirator without an exhaust valve or the mask is not fitting well. I have to tighten the top strap if the glasses fog.
The other solution is to use a powered respirator that is full face.
I use the Trend mask when turning. I used to have a racial but had trouble finding the replacement batteries.
You can buy the mask "spit" at most dive shops.
Bob
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post #6 of 15 Old 02-14-2012, 09:23 PM
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Rain X

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post #7 of 15 Old 02-14-2012, 09:27 PM
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Rain X

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I second the rain x. I used it on my snowmobile visor when it's cold. And windshield on my vehicles.

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post #8 of 15 Old 02-14-2012, 11:00 PM
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The reason your glasses fog up is because your hot breath is escaping the respirator, and getting to your glasses. One way I have fixed this is by using something like http://www.amazon.com/MSA-Safety-Works-817664-Respirator/dp/B0009XW3ZS/ref=sr_1_1?ie=UTF8&qid=1329278231&sr=8-1. This will fully enclose your mouth and nose, and keep the warm moist air away from your glasses. The filters that come with it are much better than the disposables, and last ALOT longer. You can also get organic vapor ones that filter solvents, for when you use Polyeurathane, or any other oil based products. Some might say that these are more expensive, but in the long run, they are actually much cheaper.

Just a thought.

Fabian

Fabian

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post #9 of 15 Old 02-15-2012, 08:52 AM Thread Starter
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The reason your glasses fog up is because your hot breath is escaping the respirator, and getting to your glasses. One way I have fixed this is by using something like this. This will fully enclose your mouth and nose, and keep the warm moist air away from your glasses. The filters that come with it are much better than the disposables, and last ALOT longer. You can also get organic vapor ones that filter solvents, for when you use Polyeurathane, or any other oil based products. Some might say that these are more expensive, but in the long run, they are actually much cheaper.

Just a thought.

Fabian
My respirator is very similar to this one.

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post #10 of 15 Old 02-15-2012, 11:03 AM
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There is a testing sequence you should use when putting on a respirator, they come in different sizes and you need one that fits your face. Put it on, then cover the filters with your hands. You shouldn't be able to breathe in any air, it's a very unnerving feeling when you can't take a breath. Next, cover the outlet with a hand, you shouldn't be able to breathe out. If air leaks by in either of these tests, air is leaking in and/or out and the respirator isn't doing you any good. This is particularly important when working with solvents, chemicals, pesticides, etc.

Body heat can still fog your glasses, though. There are anti fog products for the interior of windshields, helmet face shields, goggles, etc. Back in the day, we used to use a wax called Montecristo.
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post #11 of 15 Old 02-15-2012, 01:45 PM
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Originally Posted by Hammer1 View Post
There is a testing sequence you should use when putting on a respirator, they come in different sizes and you need one that fits your face. Put it on, then cover the filters with your hands. You shouldn't be able to breathe in any air, it's a very unnerving feeling when you can't take a breath. Next, cover the outlet with a hand, you shouldn't be able to breathe out. If air leaks by in either of these tests, air is leaking in and/or out and the respirator isn't doing you any good. This is particularly important when working with solvents, chemicals, pesticides, etc.

Body heat can still fog your glasses, though. There are anti fog products for the interior of windshields, helmet face shields, goggles, etc. Back in the day, we used to use a wax called Montecristo.
+1.....

Fabian

I used to be fairly indecisive, but now....... I'm not so sure.
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post #12 of 15 Old 02-16-2012, 08:37 AM Thread Starter
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Originally Posted by Hammer1 View Post
There is a testing sequence you should use when putting on a respirator, they come in different sizes and you need one that fits your face. Put it on, then cover the filters with your hands. You shouldn't be able to breathe in any air, it's a very unnerving feeling when you can't take a breath. Next, cover the outlet with a hand, you shouldn't be able to breathe out. If air leaks by in either of these tests, air is leaking in and/or out and the respirator isn't doing you any good. This is particularly important when working with solvents, chemicals, pesticides, etc.

Body heat can still fog your glasses, though. There are anti fog products for the interior of windshields, helmet face shields, goggles, etc. Back in the day, we used to use a wax called Montecristo.
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post #13 of 15 Old 09-13-2012, 11:57 AM
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Auto turtle wax also works. It stays on better than rain x and beads water better. We used to use it on truck windshields and it stayed better than rain x and works better also. have to buff it on though.

"wood does not do well outside.....well....except for trees"
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post #14 of 15 Old 05-20-2020, 05:38 PM
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As a dentist: 1.) Clean the lenses with your choice of glass cleaner + dedicated lens cloth. 2.) Using a hair blow-dryer, blast each side of both lenses until they are warm. Don the glasses, mask, etc. Your breath, etc. cannot condense upon (fog) the lenses. Leaving your glasses in place, on your face, will maintain the lenses‘ temp above dew point, with or w/o mask in place. Note: this will not work outdoors as the Usually cooler ambient Air temps will quickly chill the glass thereby allowing fogging.
Outside, in the time of COVID-19: The only sure-thing I’ve ever found was “Monte Cristo.” It is a small gray-colored block of hard wax-like substance that you rub onto the two surfaces of both lenses—as you would scribble with a crayon. Taking a clean lens cloth (I use a simple clean cotton handkerchief), cover a finger and Gently rub the Monte Cristo onto the lens surfaces until no distortion of vision is noted. Don’t wipe it completely off, just rub it until there is no distortion (screwed-up refraction) visible. Voila. The only problem is that I’m still using the original block of Monte Cristo my dad bought at a Car-Show in approx. 1962. Yep, I somehow never lost it during my many, many moves around the country.

If anybody can locate a source of this product, please chime-in.

Stay in the best of health, my friends

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post #15 of 15 Old 05-20-2020, 07:49 PM
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I saw this in the local paper, put one drop of liquid soap on a lens. Rub it around on both lenses and both sides. Remove any excess with a tissue. This worked for me. I had to go to Home depot one day when it was cold and misty. Glasses fogged up wearing a dust mask. Had to remove the glasses a dozen times. Tried the soap trick, used Dawn liquid soap. Worked as advertised. Give it a try, one drop goes a long way.
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