Woodturning Basics - Woodworking Talk - Woodworkers Forum
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
post #1 of 7 Old 11-20-2012, 11:13 PM Thread Starter
Senior Member
 
OHNOIMONFIRE's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2012
Location: Florida
Posts: 125
View OHNOIMONFIRE's Photo Album My Photos
Woodturning Basics

Hey All,

I'm progressing in my knowledge and skill of woodworking and I was interested in some of the wood turning projects I see on here. I was curious enough to look up Lathes on Amazon but I don't really know what I'm looking at. Does anyone have any starter advice for somebody completely new to turning? What sort of equipment do I need? What are easy first projects? What do you wish you knew when you first started?

Thanks!

Follow me and my current projects on Instagram! OHNOIMONFIRE
OHNOIMONFIRE is offline  
Sponsored Links
Advertisement
 
post #2 of 7 Old 11-20-2012, 11:42 PM
Senior Member
 
cuerodoc's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2012
Location: Cuero, Texas--not far from the Third Coast
Posts: 1,197
View cuerodoc's Photo Album My Photos
My advice would be to locate a club in your area and just go and see/talk to other guys that did the same thing in the past. Those questions and conversations might keep you from making an expensive mistake or two. For me this is my favorite activity other than fishin', and I'm thankful to the guys I talked with so I could see what outlay was involved and got to try tools.
cuerodoc is offline  
post #3 of 7 Old 11-20-2012, 11:56 PM
Senior Member
 
bond3737's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2009
Posts: 620
View bond3737's Photo Album My Photos
that is a HUGE question but here are a few things you should think about when starting out.
1. what is your budget- this will pretty much dictate where you start with a lathe and tools keep in mind that you will most likely spending twice or three times what you spent on your lathe on other tools- chuck, set of knives, bench grinder, grinding jig, chainsaw etc etc etc
2.what kind of projects do you want to turn? Take a look on youtube and get a feel for some of the things you think you might want to do. pens, bangles, boxes, bowls, pepper shakers, segmented work etc etc. this will give you a better idea of what kind of lathe to get and will help us give you better advice. Most everything will have a 12" swing so if you want to do projects with a larger diameter you will need a larger swing on your lathe. Sound advice is that a
Once you do these two things we can help with advice on lathe choices, tool choices and everything else you will need to do what you want to do. Meanwhile (I dont know where you live) but there are turning clubs within driving distance and they can give you some good exposure and connect you with fellow turners. Hope this helps some,
Bond
bond3737 is offline  
Sponsored Links
Advertisement
 
post #4 of 7 Old 11-21-2012, 10:38 AM
Senior Member
 
Dave Paine's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2012
Location: Eastern PA
Posts: 7,222
View Dave Paine's Photo Album My Photos
+1 with the other replies. A VERY open question.

Lathe models typically have designations e.g., 1624

The first two numbers are the "swing" and the second two are the "max distance between centres" also sometimes called the bed length.

Spindle turning vs bowl turning is an important consideration.

For spindles you may want a longer bed.

For bowls you may want more swing. The bigger the desired swing, the heavier lathe. Swing is 2 x the distance between centre of the headstock and the lathe bed. So a 12in swing lathe only has 6in between centre of the headstock and the bed. This can be reduced further if the banjo height gets in the way.

Many pen turners are happy with a 12in swing.

Note the max distance between centres is without any method to chuck (hold) the wood. Whatever method you use, e.g., spur, scroll chuck, live centre will reduce this length considerably.

I was not wanting to have to make a firm decision on spindle vs bowl so I went with a lathe with 16in swing and a 24in distance between centres.

I did purchase a bed extension for my lathe but have not used it yet.

So far I have been happy with the capacity of my lathe.

The big surprise in getting into woodturning was the cost of the "accessories". This is the first large machine I have purchased where the out-of-the-box configuration cannot be used without additional purchase of at least a turning tool.

My friend commented "Yes you need to purchase turning tools and these are expensive, at least $30 a piece". I replied I had not purchased one so inexpensive.

The turning tools can be specific to spindle vs bowl work. Another surprise.

In addition to the turning tools is the need to sharpen them - unless you purchase the more expensive carbide insert tools.

I soon found out I wanted to use a scroll chuck to hold the wood. Another expensive item. The scroll chucks take different size jaws. More expense.

I needed a better live centre for the tailstock. More expense.

We are not wanting to put you off, just make you aware that the budget side is an important consideration.

A couple of recommended videos.
This one by Mike Peace is long about 1 1/2hr, but for a person getting into woodturning, this explains the many methods of chucking wood. Any project you do on the lathe requires that you hold the wood in some manner. In many cases there are different methods needed throughout the project.

This would have helped my learning curve if I had seen this at the beginning.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=aUXil-5dEeo

A 6 part series on sharpening by Gary Gardner. This is the first part. I think most of us have some tools which need sharpening.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=9ljh...ure=plpp_video
Dave Paine is offline  
post #5 of 7 Old 11-21-2012, 10:44 AM
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Aug 2010
Location: North Carolina
Posts: 1,021
View NCPaladin's Photo Album My Photos
Here is a good (short) read on things to think about. You would want to read the “Getting started in woodturning” section. This will help you make decisions on where to start. From there you will have many many specific questions. There is also a section lathe specifications.
http://www.nealaddy.org/node/7
A local club is a good place to start. Here is a link to the AAW where you can look and see if there are affiliated clubs local to you.
http://www.woodturner.org/community/chapters/LocalChapters.asp
The basic items you need to get started are the lathe, chisles/gouges, sharpening system, face shield.

They who can give up essential liberty to obtain a little temporary safety, deserve neither liberty nor safety. Benjamin Franklin
NCPaladin is offline  
post #6 of 7 Old 11-21-2012, 12:42 PM Thread Starter
Senior Member
 
OHNOIMONFIRE's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2012
Location: Florida
Posts: 125
View OHNOIMONFIRE's Photo Album My Photos
Wow! Thanks for the detailed replies everyone.


I found a club chapter nearby my location that probably meets at my local woodcraft. Ill see if they have any beginners meetings.

I'm willing to spend $2-$400 on a lathe. I'm not sure what a chuck is but I've seen them before at stores. I wanted to do pens and pepper mills and work my way up.

Follow me and my current projects on Instagram! OHNOIMONFIRE
OHNOIMONFIRE is offline  
post #7 of 7 Old 11-21-2012, 02:43 PM
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Aug 2010
Location: North Carolina
Posts: 1,021
View NCPaladin's Photo Album My Photos
Woodcraft is supposed to have the Rikon 1216 lathe on sale during black Friday between 230 and 270. It appears to be very nice; I have turned on Rikons but not the electronic speed control like this one has.

Woodcraft also has classes in many locations (paid). Your local club typically has a demo’s at monthly meetings. Some will be simple and others complex to meet all members’ interest. Many also have workshops several times a year for all day activities.

The video by Mike Peace which Dave gave you the link to will give you excellent terminology in most all chucking/holding methods. You don’t have to have a chuck to start with but they are nice; a good sharpening system is more important imho.

They who can give up essential liberty to obtain a little temporary safety, deserve neither liberty nor safety. Benjamin Franklin
NCPaladin is offline  
Reply

Quick Reply
Message:
Options

Register Now



In order to be able to post messages on the Woodworking Talk - Woodworkers Forum forums, you must first register.
Please enter your desired user name, your email address and other required details in the form below.

User Name:
Password
Please enter a password for your user account. Note that passwords are case-sensitive.

Password:


Confirm Password:
Email Address
Please enter a valid email address for yourself.

Email Address:
OR

Log-in










Thread Tools
Show Printable Version Show Printable Version
Email this Page Email this Page
Display Modes
Linear Mode Linear Mode



Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Dust Collection Basics woodnthings General Woodworking Discussion 30 03-19-2013 07:15 AM
Help with some basics... Ryn0nTX General Woodworking Discussion 19 06-29-2012 01:08 AM
Stain and clearcoat basics seeeker Wood Finishing 26 03-10-2011 02:28 AM
The basics - Where do you get your wood from? beelzerob General Woodworking Discussion 42 05-17-2010 05:47 PM
Wood Finishing Basics? M Spangler Wood Finishing 3 02-01-2008 12:03 PM

Posting Rules  
You may post new threads
You may post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off

 
For the best viewing experience please update your browser to Google Chrome