Wolverine sharpening jig question. - Woodworking Talk - Woodworkers Forum
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post #1 of 7 Old 12-01-2019, 01:54 PM Thread Starter
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Wolverine sharpening jig question.

When I got my Wolverine sharpening jig the instructions said when sharpening a gouge let it stick out 1 3/4" so that is what I did. I have read that most people let the tip of the gouge stick out 2" and other people do all kind of different things. I guess if I go from 1 3/4" too 2" it will change the bevel. I guess what I am asking is what is it all about? I don't understand.

Don in Murfreesboro, TN.

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post #2 of 7 Old 12-01-2019, 04:13 PM
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Experienced woodturners have different personal preferences for the bevel angles on their gouges. For most, it is a matter of personal preference, or what works best the way they use tools. Professional woodturners may have multiple turning tool sets with different bevel angles depending on the kind of wood they are turning.

You are right, adjusting how far the tool sticks out will alter the bevel angle. An important skill to learn is being able to match the bevel angle perfectly every time. Otherwise, you will find yourself cutting new bevels too often and wearing down your tools.

The Robert Sorby set that I use has three gouges: Spindle roughing gouge (843H), Spindle gouge (840H), and Bowl gouge (842H). The factory bevel angle for each of them is 45 degrees.

In "Woodturning, A Foundation Course", Keith Rowley recommends the following angles for hobbyists: Roughing-out gouges: 45 degrees, Spindle gouges: 35 degrees, and Bowl Gouges: 55 degrees.

Furthermore, the shape of the tool profile can also vary between woodturners. Some prefer very exaggerated fingernail profiles, while others prefer them nearly straight across. Roughing gouges are usually straight across or nearly so, and the other gouges have a fingernail profile. The subtle differences in shapes and the names of various turning tool profiles is a graduate course in itself.

Hints:

-> Find a way to map or measure tool bevel angle to Wolverine protrusion length. You should know the angle that you expect to get and be able to set it consistently. Choose average bevel angles to start. 45 degrees on the gouges would be okay.

-> Learn to sharpen and resharpen the exact same bevel angle. After that, you can play with bevel angles to learn the differences. First, sharpen with consistency.

-> Write down the Wolverine settings for each individual tool as a memory aid and to check setting consistency. Keep in mind that the settings may change over time as the grinding wheel and the tool wear down.
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post #3 of 7 Old 12-01-2019, 05:58 PM
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I think what you are looking for is consistency. I use the Wolverine system to sharpen my lathe chisels. I made a simple jig to set the tool at a consistent 2”. The jig is simply a piece of 2 x 4 with a 2” deep hole drilled into it. I purchased the entire set of Raptor Setup Tools for the Wolverine system to keep sharpening angles consistent and as Tool Agnostic suggests I keep notes for each chisel on angle and how it is sharpened. I find the notes helpful when I haven’t been turning for awhile. They help refresh this old memory of mine.
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post #4 of 7 Old 12-02-2019, 03:27 PM
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Kerry, good idea and notes for failing memory.

A diamond is how coal reacts under pressure.
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post #5 of 7 Old 12-02-2019, 09:30 PM Thread Starter
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Thanks a lot, guys, you all post helped a lot. A few days ago I ordered a Robert Sorby bowl gouge with a regular grind on it. My other bowl gouge is a Robert Sorby with the sweptback wings. This is the one that has been giving me so much trouble. If I use it you can bet I am going to tear up something. The gouge I got today did a whole lot better for me. It doesn't take much to make a big difference.
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Don in Murfreesboro, TN.
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post #6 of 7 Old 12-03-2019, 03:35 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Kerrys View Post
I think what you are looking for is consistency. I use the Wolverine system to sharpen my lathe chisels. I made a simple jig to set the tool at a consistent 2”. The jig is simply a piece of 2 x 4 with a 2” deep hole drilled into it.
look at 4:00 for the block kerrys is referring to. this video is pretty good reference for that system. i only have one bowl gouge that has been hand sharpened for the last 40 years. i really need to either make one or find someone local to fine tune mine. the jig itself looks pretty basic

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post #7 of 7 Old 12-04-2019, 08:46 PM
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I glued a coin in the bottom of the hole to set the depth. That way it doesn't get deeper from use.
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