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post #1 of 13 Old 02-23-2009, 08:27 AM Thread Starter
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why?

Why are turning tools not marked on the tool itself, as to what it is?
Once you take it out of package....Im lost..lol Yes i know...I could keep it in its package, but like say you wanted to keep them all in a case or whathave you...any good ways of marking them? I was thinking of using a sharpie marker...andyone else have any better ideas?

Thanks
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post #2 of 13 Old 02-23-2009, 09:57 AM
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Why

Please don't take this as being disrespectfull,but why would you want to mark them?when you buy them you should know what you just bought.I think I'm gonna get in trouble here
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post #3 of 13 Old 02-23-2009, 10:16 AM
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The other reason is that you can use any of the tools in a number of ways. For example you could use a round nose scraper to turn a box, make a cove, turn a bowl, shear scrape a bowl, etc. also each manufacturer has a certain shape that they think a tool should be and sometimes the it's a little fuzzy where one stops and the other begins. A good example of this is a spindle gouge, rough out gouge and detail gouge. If you look at all the different rough out gouges there are several that look an awful lot like what I would call a spindle gouge. The same is true of spindle gouges. Some of them look a lot like what I refer to as a detail gouge. Then you throw in words like Continental gouge and start naming them like the Ray Key parting tool and the Ellsworth gouge. It gets pretty confusing.
I know what your asking but you really can't name a tool for it's particular use. Well now that I think of it you can, ( see the beading tool) but in reality a beading tool is nothing more than a Bedan or a thick straight ground skew.
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post #4 of 13 Old 02-23-2009, 11:03 AM Thread Starter
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I understand where your coming from...

I can see once you have been using these tools its like riding a bike...you know what tool does what. I was refering to someone who is just getting started...it would be really nice if the makers of the tool..would put somekind of marking, as to what it was made to do( i understand that you can do more than just one thing with many) but having a ball park figure would help out so much. Then someone like ME...wouldnt have to take a picture of a tool.and post it online to have someone try to tell them what it is..because he didnt know what it was because it was no longer in the package it was bought in

Last edited by Wonderwood; 02-23-2009 at 11:06 AM.
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post #5 of 13 Old 02-23-2009, 11:34 AM
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A turning tool means nothing unless you can put a proper grind for your usage and maintain it sharp. You can't turn a bowl simply because the bowl gouge was used. A cutting edge is a cutting edge, it would have different effect if you present the edge to the spinning blank differently. Usually there is more than 1 way to achieve the same goal in wood turning. Don't let the terminology confuse you.
Bob Rosand uses a bowl gouge to rough out spindles instead of roughing gouge. Stuart Batty and Jimmy Clewes use a bowl gouge to turn long stem goblet stems. Those are some of the examples you can find in the turning DVDs.
Once you learn how the tool grinds should look like, you won't have problem naming them. BTW, not all factory grinds are sharp or fit your style of turning. The factory grind is to make the tool looks good and to attract buyers.
Buy individual tool instead of a set. Buying tools in a set is false economy. Usually there are couple tools that you will hardly use in a set.
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post #6 of 13 Old 02-23-2009, 11:47 AM
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I think they should stamp on them, "This end forward" That would stop a lot of confusion. :)
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post #7 of 13 Old 02-23-2009, 01:08 PM
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Omg

Guys, think what he could be talking about.....

if you look at the end of some tools and see a + + +what are they? and is it the same as l l l ? No they are different tools and sizes usually with the exact same handle. Nut driver sizes are color codded O1/4" O 5/16" O11l32" O3/8" O7/16" If he has a blind storage like most of us do you cant see the tips. I think that is more of what he is saying.

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post #8 of 13 Old 02-23-2009, 01:20 PM
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Since no one has really contributed to the original question yet, I will throw out an idea: Maybe you could put a piece of masking tape around the end, then mark them. That way, once you have a better understanding of them, you can remove the tape and the tool does not forever have "SPINDLE GOUGE" written on it.

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post #9 of 13 Old 02-23-2009, 03:45 PM
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My friend who teaches out of his house has all of the student tools color coded. Spindle gouges have one color, roughing gouges have one color, etc. That way he can say, use the blue tool to rough out the blank and the yellow tool for this, etc. I do remember that he had the skews painted red since that's the tool with the worst reputation.
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post #10 of 13 Old 02-23-2009, 07:05 PM Thread Starter
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Thank you for the responses that were helpful...the others..well im sorry if I don't understand what each tool is MEANT to be used for yet. In time, Im sure I will...and I will beable to look back at this, and maybe help someone else that is in my postion down the road. Until then I will keep learning, and taking the advice of all the HELPFUL members on this site.


Thank you again
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post #11 of 13 Old 02-23-2009, 07:56 PM
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Thumbs up Why?

Wonderwood. If this helps, I've taken a "Sharpie" and marked the size on the end of the handle. I've drilled holes in the table top of my base and drop them into the holes for storage while I turn. For example if it's a scrape I mark it with an "S". If it's a bowl gouge I mark it with 3/8,1/2 and etc. At a quick glance I can see what tool I'm picking up next. It works for me. Harold.
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post #12 of 13 Old 02-23-2009, 08:49 PM
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WW,
I know it seems confusing now. Buy your tools one at a time as Gordon suggested. And don't buy a bunch of single tools at once. That would defeat the purpose of going slowly with your purchases. As you play with your lathe more, you will get to the point of recognizing the tools by sight. Again, this is where a club setting really speeds up the learning curve. Just plug along, if you want to mark the tools with a sharpie, go ahead. It won't hurt anything. Eventually the sharpie will wear off and by that time, you will know one from another.
Mike Hawkins
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post #13 of 13 Old 02-23-2009, 10:16 PM
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dont feel bad I have had my lathe for 3 months and havent even bought any tools for it. My wife was going to suprice me and get me some for Chistmas but was overwelmed when she went into Woodcraft. Not sure if it was the price or the selection.
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