V-Skew first impression - Woodworking Talk - Woodworkers Forum
 
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post #1 of 9 Old 01-14-2011, 09:25 PM Thread Starter
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V-Skew first impression

On Monday Keith Tompkins gave a demo at my local woodturners club meeting showing his V-Skew. For starters he mounted a 2x4 with widely spaced growth rings into the lathe and roughed it down with the skew, then started doing some beads and coves. Then he put some oak in the lathe and turned a complete finial. I got to try it for a few minutes during the meeting, but wasn't quite sure it was that much different from what I could do with my regular skew.

Feeling adventurous I ordered one anyway, got it tonight and got some time to play with it. I recreated the 2x4 demo (the pine smelled nice) and generally goofed around. I used a dead center as a drive center for extra safety because I was deliberately provoking catches. I did manage a few catches, but not nearly as many as I deserved. I switched to my regular skew for a while and found the v-skew really was easier for some things.

I do think that doing a straight planing cut might be easier on the traditional skew because it has a bevel to ride and I think the v-skew might pick up more vibration, but the v-skew is fun to use.

Anyone else play with a v-skew yet? I do have a faint concern that maybe if I started to use the v-skew I'd be cheating myself out of the "classical training" of a skew, not sure about that.
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post #2 of 9 Old 01-15-2011, 09:47 AM
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V-skew first impression

He wouldn't have a video on it would he ?

God Bless all
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post #3 of 9 Old 01-15-2011, 07:08 PM Thread Starter
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I asked and he said he's working on a video for his website.
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post #4 of 9 Old 01-15-2011, 11:03 PM Thread Starter
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Here are the first results of goofing around with the v-skew. Neither pieces have been touched by sandpaper and almost entirely with the v-skew starting from a 2x4 for the bottom piece and a square chunk of oak for the top piece.
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post #5 of 9 Old 01-16-2011, 08:00 AM
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Looks like a rip off of Sorby's Spindlemaster.
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post #6 of 9 Old 01-16-2011, 09:41 AM
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what makes it superior to the traditional skew?
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post #7 of 9 Old 01-16-2011, 05:57 PM Thread Starter
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@Hammer1 - it certainly looks related to the Sorby, but the Sorby seems more round where this is more of an angle. Given that there are just so many shapes you can grind into the end of a piece of steel it seems that differences are subtle to allow everyone to get their own name on something. I'm sure some would start to argue that this isn't really a skew, but a flat gouge.

So far I'm finding that it's harder to catch and you can also use the very tip of the tool which you don't do with a skew. It handles like a detail gouge. I found that when working on a small diameter in between two larger diameter sections I could get in there more with the v-skew than a regular skew.
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post #8 of 9 Old 01-21-2011, 05:25 PM
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Hey all, Just thought I'd answer a few questions concerning the v-skew...Sprior let me know he posted about the tool demo here. Basically, the v-skew is a single-bevel skew chisel. The reason a conventional skew has two bevels is that just one tool is needed for right and left cuts. The two angles of the conventional skew is a compromise...the tendency to catch unexpectedly is the downside. A single bevel skew can only cut in one direction; so two tools would be needed to perform the work of one regular skew. By combining both a right and left hand skew, the v-skew is formed. Unlike the Sorby tool, it is a true skew chisel, with a long and short point. Unlike a conventional skew, both short and long points can be used with far less fear of getting a catch. While the tool can be ground with the same included angle as a regular skew, the geometry, and the approach to the wood is far different. Similar to a gouge, the cutting edge of the v-skew is on the same plane as the tool shaft, while the skew's top bevel angles downward no matter what angle the tool handle is oriented. Does it work? Yes, my unscientific field tests, with both advanced skew turners and those who won't touch a skew were conclusive. Is it cheating? Well, how many turners will complete a turning, and grab a skew chisel for the final cut? I can tell you from my teaching experience...not too many. What good is a tool if it sits in the rack unused? Many turners are retired and approach turning as a hobby; how many have the time and patience to master the conventional skew? So that is basically the idea behind the v-skew. I will hopefully produce a video in the near future. Thanks for reading, I would be glad to answer any questions. Keith

I added a couple of photos of my work.

Last edited by Ktompkins; 01-21-2011 at 06:21 PM. Reason: added photos
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post #9 of 9 Old 01-21-2011, 10:45 PM
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Sprior, I've been using a Spindlemaster for a while. Like your samples, if you get it right, you don't need/want sanding. My spindle tools are reduced to a roughing gouge, a parting tool and the Spindlemaster, now. The SM is sharpened on the flat back which is rather easy, the bevel is rounded and highly polished which gives you the fine finish. I'm still getting the hang of it and you can catch the SM, too! I have the 1/2" and the 1", so far, I'm liking them.
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