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post #1 of 11 Old 06-16-2011, 05:05 PM Thread Starter
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Tool care

I'd be interested to hear what your routines are for keeping tools clean and preventing rust (including lathe, bandsaw, turning tools, etc.). I'm starting to see some rust on things I've only had since January and I thought I was being careful. Turning green wood clearly requires some extra attention to tool care.
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post #2 of 11 Old 06-16-2011, 05:58 PM
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Where to start? I use Turtle Wax paste car wax on all the cast iron parts of my tools: lathe rails, table saw table, band saw table, jointer beds. I have a little routine for the last few years of doing annual shop maintenance on New Years Day. Start the new year with clean and properly aligned tools is my thought. Then depending upon how much use/abuse I give the tools, I'll repeat the wax/tune-up as needed during the year. As for turning tools, I always wipe down with a dry cloth before putting them back in the cabinet and I always save time to sharpen before I put them away. This way I know a tool is sharp the next time I go to use it. Part of this routine comes from my dad who was an auto mechanic all his working life. Tools were not left out, they were put away immediately after use, exactly where they belong, clean. As kids we were allowed to use dad's tools provided we followed the above rules.

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post #3 of 11 Old 06-16-2011, 09:46 PM
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Quote:
Where to start? I use Turtle Wax paste car wax on all the cast iron parts of my tools
What a darn good idea Although I live in a fairly dry climate and rust is not a major issue. This is a good tip that I will use, thanks.

As a young guy I lived by the beach and the climate was very humid and laden with salt. A total pain in the proverbial, we used a solution of lanolin and any suitable solvent ie petrol, NDA etc 10% lanolin and the solvent, it work fine although you had to wipe down the tools prior to use.

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post #4 of 11 Old 06-16-2011, 10:35 PM
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I don't do thing with my tools. I do wipe down the lathe with WD-40 and if any shavings get on my table saw, jointer or bandsaw I wipe it off immediately. I do keep an eye on my chucks to keep any rust down.
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post #5 of 11 Old 06-17-2011, 02:42 AM
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Originally Posted by hughie View Post

As a young guy I lived by the beach and the climate was very humid and laden with salt. A total pain in the proverbial, we used a solution of lanolin and any suitable solvent ie petrol, NDA etc 10% lanolin and the solvent, it work fine although you had to wipe down the tools prior to use.
I have this exact problem, and the lanolon solution has proven to be the best way to keep steel items like tools and my Roman armour free of rust.
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post #6 of 11 Old 06-17-2011, 05:18 AM
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Like Sawdustfactory says.

I learned shop/tool discipline very early in life. Dad was a cabinet maker, I'm a mechanic.

I was taught at the end of the day, tools are put away as if they are never going to be used again. Everything gets cleaned, first. Tools are sharpened. If something is missing, go find it. Benches and tool boxes are wiped down and the floor swept. This is a ritual I do every day, sometimes twice a day.

Tool maintenance is constant. If something breaks,I fix it. My metal lathe and drill press get cleaned and oiled after every use. My wood working machines get vacuumed inside and out. Once a month, especially during humid or rainy times, a coat of wax on everything.

Believe it or not, I can "close up" my wood shop in 20 minutes, that's beer time for me.
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post #7 of 11 Old 06-17-2011, 06:01 AM
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We have a cabinet shop and a machine shop..........am WAY more "fussy" in wood world WRT cleaning,oiling,putting away tools.Understanding where oil is,and isn't appropriate.For instance;a die grinder or air sander used in wood shop will get the bare minimum of oil....almost to the point of starvation.Simply can't have oil drippin on wood.Further,in wood shop is a very nice service(bucket) sink.I have to keep my hands clean around raw,unfinished wood.Dawn brand liquid detergent and green scotchbrite is used on my hands......after trying just about everything.The Dawn is also the "Derigueur" for paintbrush cleaning.....and a drop or two after cleaning is good for their storage.

The machine shop is nasty.Bridgeport's utilize a "total loss" oiling system.......if it dosn't have oil dripping from spindle,it's in need of some.Likewise the lathe'e stay WET with oil.And don't/won't clean up the piles of chips until they obscure some function of that equip.The BS in there sits in its own little pile of swarf.While I put very little faith in WD40(its Varsol in a can),for any lubricating properties......it is a heck of a good,cheap enough cleaner.

Overall,I'm way more concerned about the "atmosphere" than any ritual waxing or oiling.......all contamination issues aside.IOWs if you can control the shops humidity levels along with alittle understanding of your own body chemistry......rust and its abatement issues sort of just go away.Best of luck,BW

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post #8 of 11 Old 06-17-2011, 09:56 AM
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For any bare tool surfaces such as the table top on the table saw or the bed on the lathe I use WD-40 it keeps a nice barrier to protect the metal from surface rust and can be easily reapplied after using the tool. For hand tools a quick wipe down with a clean rag before putting them away will keep them looking good. I tend to sharpen my tools right before use, an old habit from having to share tools in a shop where someone may have used it after I did without re-sharpening the tool.

I want to die quietly in my sleep like my grandfather, not screaming in terror like the passengers of his car.
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post #9 of 11 Old 06-17-2011, 01:18 PM
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If rust has started, I use a product call Rust Mort or Osphos (or store brands at True Value, etc). They all convert iron oxide (rust) to iron phosphate (not-rust). The ex-rust turns black and I typically go over it with steel wood then the wax of your choice. I prefer wax to oil as the wax will harden and not attract and hold dust.

They who can give up essential liberty to obtain a little temporary safety, deserve neither liberty nor safety. Benjamin Franklin
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post #10 of 11 Old 06-28-2011, 10:08 AM Thread Starter
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Thanks for the posts. I think my problem stems from my fragmented time in the shop. It is rare for me to get more than a couple hours shop time before getting pulled away by work/wife/life. I often wrap some plastic around my project and leave everything as is, hoping I'll get back to it later in the day. Of course sometimes it may be a day or two that my stuff sits there covered in green shavings. I'm jealous of you guys that have figured out how to spend a solid day in the shop on a regular basis.
Bottom line is, I need to take two minutes to at least put my cutting tools up and blow off the lathe in case I don't get back soon. Ultimately I need to organize my life so I can dedicate enough time to at least take a project from start to finish with time for a good cleanup (and maybe a beer).
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post #11 of 11 Old 06-28-2011, 10:28 AM
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Something that doesn't take much time is just brushing off the lathe with a bench brush or old paint brush. It takes only a few minutes to get all the bare metal clear of shavings which will help, and what gets pushed to the floor can be cleaned up later when you have more time to sweep.

I want to die quietly in my sleep like my grandfather, not screaming in terror like the passengers of his car.
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