Tear-out - Woodworking Talk - Woodworkers Forum
 
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post #1 of 13 Old 05-15-2011, 08:08 AM Thread Starter
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Tear-out

Sorry no pics, I was working on another purple heart bowl yesterday and went through about 4' of that 1" wide 80grit sandpaper (woodcraft turners pack) on this bowl removing tear-out on the end grain side of the outside of the bowl. My tools are sharp! I even went as far as honing my skews on my Norton water-stones all the way up to 8000 (I knew it was a vain attempt) but had to try. Does anyone have any ideas as to how to deal with this?
I have gone as far as reversing the lathe and standing on the opposite side.

I don't think it would be the cheapo red handles from HF because I do get them sharp (easily shaves hair on my arm).
I also tried my Craftsmen (The craftsmen tools seem flimsy)

I have had this problem before on a couple spots on a couple different bowls and just sand them out burning my fingertips

Is there a better way?

Anybody can become a woodworker, but only a Craftsmen can hide his mistakes!

Last edited by slicksqueegie; 05-15-2011 at 08:12 AM.
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post #2 of 13 Old 05-15-2011, 09:01 AM
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I am a complete novice to turning but if purple heart is as hard as it sounds maybe you could use a good clean file assuring the correct rotation to get a good cutting angle. Just a thought.

"IF IT'S TOO TOUGH FOR THEM, IT'S JUST RIGHT FOR ME"
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post #3 of 13 Old 05-15-2011, 10:48 AM
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Have you tried applying mineral oil or CA glue to the tear out, then try to turn away?
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post #4 of 13 Old 05-15-2011, 11:08 AM Thread Starter
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Quote:
Originally Posted by wildwood View Post
Have you tried applying mineral oil or CA glue to the tear out, then try to turn away?
??no

Does it work?

Anybody can become a woodworker, but only a Craftsmen can hide his mistakes!
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post #5 of 13 Old 05-15-2011, 11:12 AM
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I have had the same problem when working with purple heart bowls.

I had the best results when I hand sanded the affected area - starting with 200 grit and working my way up. It seemed the wood reacted better. Lathe sanding seemed to just skip over the affected area - even on slow speeds.

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post #6 of 13 Old 05-15-2011, 11:22 AM
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Several things to try:
1. Try cutting in the other direction (R to L or L to R)
2. Try using a scraper taking very light passes
3. Try raising the grain with water and then sanding
4. Try sanding discs on a drill mandrel with the lathe running in reverse
5. Try filling the tear out with thick CA and some dust from your previous sanding attempts.

That bowl was perfect right up until that last cut...
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post #7 of 13 Old 05-15-2011, 01:32 PM
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First and always try sharpening the tool and slow down the speed you feed the tool into the work. You also might try sharpening your gouge to a sharper angle. I have one gouge sharpened to 40 degrees instead of my usual 55. Slowing my feed rate and using this tool usually produces a surface I can sand with 180 or 220. Not always unfortunately.
Wetting the surface sometimes works. I have spray bottle I use.
For worse case scenarios I use a Hunter carbide tool. The cutting edge on these is about 30 degrees or less. Used properly with a bevel rubbing technique it will cut super clean. I have a video showing how these are used on the Hunter tool website. Look under testimonials I think. http://www.hunterwoodturningtool.com/
Worse case, and mean really bad, turn the lathe off and use a curved hand held cabinet scraper. You can usually get rid of any tearout this way and then you can blend the divot into the surrounding wood. After that you can usually sand lightly with 80 grit and work your way up.
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post #8 of 13 Old 05-15-2011, 02:40 PM
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power SANDING !
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post #9 of 13 Old 05-15-2011, 11:18 PM
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What about changing the angle of your tool? I had a professional show me that I was holding my tools wrong, since then my sanding has reduced dramatically
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post #10 of 13 Old 05-16-2011, 02:18 AM
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Yup, the wrong angle causes about 90% of the problems in lathe work. It's the Angle of the Dangle, don't ya know.

Harrison, at your service!
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post #11 of 13 Old 05-16-2011, 09:04 AM
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Closely examine how the wood is crossing the cutting edge. A simple rotation of the gouge a few degrees can change the cut from a 50 degree angle to a 20 degree angle depending on where the wood hits the U part of the gouge. some turners use a more blunt U shape tip rather than the swept back grind that is now popular. What this does is it lets you use the uprising part of the U on a very steep angle, anywhere from about 5 degrees to 20 degrees.
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post #12 of 13 Old 05-17-2011, 05:21 PM
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I use a scraper made from a file when I have tearout problems. Leaves a slightly rough surface thats easy to sand out but avoids the tearout problem.
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post #13 of 13 Old 05-18-2011, 06:59 AM Thread Starter
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Thank you everyone for the helpful suggestions.

Anybody can become a woodworker, but only a Craftsmen can hide his mistakes!
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