Which stabilizing product - Woodworking Talk - Woodworkers Forum
 
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post #1 of 10 Old 03-06-2012, 11:39 PM Thread Starter
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Which stabilizing product

I'm getting closer to stabilizing some pen blanks for resale and would appreciate some input on which stabilizing product you either use or prefer to be used. I'm leaning toward Minwax wood hardener right now. From what I've read it gives a hard finish but not so hard as to quickly dull tools. I'll be using a vacuum chamber w/pump.

There's a lot of products out there including some home brew like dissolving plexiglass in acetone.

I no longer do lathe work so my personal preference doesn't matter.

What say you turners?

"The LORD inhabits the praises of HIS people."


r.i.p. Marco Simoncelli - 10-23-2011
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post #2 of 10 Old 03-07-2012, 08:41 PM
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Ive used minwax wood stabilizer and was not that impressed. The wood i used it on was some very punky stuff though. It deff made it a little harder and seemed to penitrate fairly well. Im no expert with the stuff but what i found worked the best was to poor the liquid into some type of container and dunk the pen blanks in the hardener and keep them submerged untill you stop seeing bubbles come out. You would be amazed at how much the blanks can absorb. Then you can just poor the hardener back in the origional container when done.
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post #3 of 10 Old 03-08-2012, 09:56 AM Thread Starter
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Ive used minwax wood stabilizer and was not that impressed. The wood i used it on was some very punky stuff though. It deff made it a little harder and seemed to penitrate fairly well. Im no expert with the stuff but what i found worked the best was to poor the liquid into some type of container and dunk the pen blanks in the hardener and keep them submerged untill you stop seeing bubbles come out. You would be amazed at how much the blanks can absorb. Then you can just poor the hardener back in the origional container when done.
Were you happy with the hardness of the wood afterwards?

"The LORD inhabits the praises of HIS people."


r.i.p. Marco Simoncelli - 10-23-2011
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post #4 of 10 Old 03-08-2012, 09:59 AM
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Came someone teach a newbie turner about this topic? Why would someone stabilize a wood?

Right now I am drying out wood blanks with green wood sealer, and then I was planning on turning those blanks when dry. Why would I need a stabilizing product?

Thanks
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post #5 of 10 Old 03-08-2012, 10:10 AM
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Take a look at this brew being made by an IAP member.
http://www.turntex.com/index.php?pag...art&Itemid=121
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post #6 of 10 Old 03-08-2012, 10:35 AM Thread Starter
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Came someone teach a newbie turner about this topic? Why would someone stabilize a wood?

Right now I am drying out wood blanks with green wood sealer, and then I was planning on turning those blanks when dry. Why would I need a stabilizing product?

Thanks
Well, since I no longer use a lathe, if I speak in error then someone please correct me.

The sealer you are using is going to keep the moisture in the wood rather that let it escape. Better to seal the ends only to prevent checking and leave the sides open so the moisture san escape.

Spalted wood is more popular with turners. But since spalting is basically the wood rotting by being eaten by fungi, the wood often gets soft (aka punky) and although the colors given by look nice , the wood is to far gone (soft/punky) to be turned without coming apart - aka exploding, blowing up. So a stabilizer is used after drying to 6% or lower. My method will be to put the dry blanks in a vacuum chamber and cover with some sort of stabilizeing solution and pull a vacuum with a vacuum pump to draw the solution into the wood to re-strengthen it. After this cycle is complete the blank is removed and allowed to dry or cure and then it's ready to turn.

Hope this helps.

"The LORD inhabits the praises of HIS people."


r.i.p. Marco Simoncelli - 10-23-2011
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post #7 of 10 Old 03-08-2012, 10:55 AM
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Originally Posted by bikeshooter View Post
Well, since I no longer use a lathe, if I speak in error then someone please correct me.

The sealer you are using is going to keep the moisture in the wood rather that let it escape. Better to seal the ends only to prevent checking and leave the sides open so the moisture san escape.

Spalted wood is more popular with turners. But since spalting is basically the wood rotting by being eaten by fungi, the wood often gets soft (aka punky) and although the colors given by look nice , the wood is to far gone (soft/punky) to be turned without coming apart - aka exploding, blowing up. So a stabilizer is used after drying to 6% or lower. My method will be to put the dry blanks in a vacuum chamber and cover with some sort of stabilizeing solution and pull a vacuum with a vacuum pump to draw the solution into the wood to re-strengthen it. After this cycle is complete the blank is removed and allowed to dry or cure and then it's ready to turn.

Hope this helps.

Sure does! thanks a alot
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post #8 of 10 Old 03-08-2012, 12:50 PM Thread Starter
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Originally Posted by chriskoww View Post

I was planning on turning those blanks when dry.

Thanks
Are you cutting your blanks from green wood and then drying?

"The LORD inhabits the praises of HIS people."


r.i.p. Marco Simoncelli - 10-23-2011
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post #9 of 10 Old 03-08-2012, 01:39 PM
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Were you happy with the hardness of the wood afterwards?
On the really punky spalted maple no. But i had some half roted cherry that i was pretty happy with the results. I think if its fairly stable to begin with the stabilers works well but, if its some soft really punky stuff it just does not cut it.
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post #10 of 10 Old 03-08-2012, 02:23 PM Thread Starter
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On the really punky spalted maple no. But i had some half roted cherry that i was pretty happy with the results. I think if its fairly stable to begin with the stabilers works well but, if its some soft really punky stuff it just does not cut it.
That helps a lot - thanks

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r.i.p. Marco Simoncelli - 10-23-2011
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