Sealing endgrain on a log - Woodworking Talk - Woodworkers Forum
 
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post #1 of 14 Old 09-10-2008, 09:20 PM Thread Starter
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Sealing endgrain on a log

What can I use on a log to seal it up on the ends? I found a nice spalted maple log and I would like to save it.

Donny
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post #2 of 14 Old 09-10-2008, 10:22 PM
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Don, I'm sure others may have some additional ideas but what I had been advised of and ended up purchasing is a product from Woodcraft called Anchorseal. It is a green wood sealer used on the endgrain of logs or lumber.

John

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post #3 of 14 Old 09-10-2008, 11:01 PM
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Johns idea is good, but a less expensive option is to use some of your leftover LATEX paint (NOT oil based). It will seal the end grain, not penetrate into the wood, and allow moisture to escape slowly. I have done this with very good results.

Mike O
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post #4 of 14 Old 09-11-2008, 08:06 AM
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I use anchorseal like John said usually...but in a pinch I too have used exterior latex paint like Mike, minimum of 2 coats. One coat then another the next day-maybe a 3rd the next. Anchorseal is better but I have milled, air dried then finish kiln dried lumber with just the paint and it is for sure way better than nothing.
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post #5 of 14 Old 09-11-2008, 09:29 AM
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The best bet is wax. I've tried latex paint, roof tar, and I now use Anchorseal. None of them really work to save the log. They all prolong the time before it splits but if you really want to save it turn it as soon as you can.
I'm currently setting up a system to try and prolong the log even longer. I just purchased an electric frying pan and will melt wax in it. Then I can dip the logs ends in the wax. I'm going to try cutting some into bowl blanks and completely covering them to see how this does.
I have a problem in that I get all my wood in batches all at once. Sort of when it rains it pours syndrome. I end up throwing a lot of it away after 6 months.
What I've found that works for me it to coat all the logs with anchorseal as soon as possible. When I have time I split the larger ones at the heart. Store them out of the sun and off the ground if possible. Later when I have time and I see them starting to split anyway I cut them up into strips like 3x3 4x4 or even bigger if I can get away with it. I store these in the shop if they don't already have bugs. I still get some loss due to end checks and that's where the wax comes in. I plan to coat the ends on the longer pieces and on shorter pieces that will fit the frying pan coat the whole piece.
If you have time rough out the bowls and coat the end grains minimum. If it's an important piece of wood coat the whole thing and on woods like Apricot, apple etc I put in a paper sack.
I still end up storing an awful lot of wood outside because I simply don't have the space. consequently I still lose a lot but a lot less than before. Getting it off the ground,out of the sun and sealing the ends has done the most good.
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post #6 of 14 Old 09-11-2008, 12:20 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by john lucas View Post
and on woods like Apricot, apple etc I put in a paper sack.
Excuse my lack of knowledge but why is this done? Thanks


John
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post #7 of 14 Old 09-11-2008, 02:19 PM
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One of the best ways to keep wood from checking is to even out the drying. Air movement causes the wood to dry faster so slowing down the drying time helps even out the forces that cause the cracking. Wood looses moisture out of the end grain the fastest so we coat the endgrain to try and slow this down. The paper sack will still let moisture out but helps slow down the loss of moisture. I often use a box and put 3 or 4 bowls in there. I leave them that way for several weeks. Once it's past the initial rapid moisture loss I can take them out and put them on the shelf.
A plastic sack will stop the moisture release but it causes mold. I often use a plastic sack if I absolutely don't want to lose the wood and know that I can get to it in a week or so. The plastic sack causes mold which discolors the wood but it's great for holding a piece of wood at the same moisture level as when you put it in there.
Wood cracks because the outside of the tree will dry first and shrink. The inside is still wet and the same diameter as it was so something has to give, it cracks to release this stress. If you can get the inside to dry at the same rate as the outer few inches it won't crack. This is why we coat the end. If you saw it into you have already released much of the stress and it reduces the checking but you can still have problems if you don't slow the drying down.
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post #8 of 14 Old 09-11-2008, 07:18 PM
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sealing endgrain

I used latex for yrs ,then found out about anchorseal and havn,t looked back.If you decide to go with the anchorseal,go to uccoatings as they are a lot cheaper than other places.
Ken
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post #9 of 14 Old 09-11-2008, 10:43 PM
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John, Thank you very much for your detailed explanation. I love this forum. I feel like i get a little smarter everytime I read it!

John
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post #10 of 14 Old 09-20-2008, 11:14 PM
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This forum is really great just asked a question and somebody will give you there input.

Lilty
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post #11 of 14 Old 09-26-2008, 05:48 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by john lucas View Post
The best bet is wax. I've tried latex paint, roof tar, and I now use Anchorseal. None of them really work to save the log. They all prolong the time before it splits but if you really want to save it turn it as soon as you can.
I'm currently setting up a system to try and prolong the log even longer. I just purchased an electric frying pan and will melt wax in it. Then I can dip the logs ends in the wax. I'm going to try cutting some into bowl blanks and completely covering them to see how this does.
I have a problem in that I get all my wood in batches all at once. Sort of when it rains it pours syndrome. I end up throwing a lot of it away after 6 months.
What I've found that works for me it to coat all the logs with anchorseal as soon as possible. When I have time I split the larger ones at the heart. Store them out of the sun and off the ground if possible. Later when I have time and I see them starting to split anyway I cut them up into strips like 3x3 4x4 or even bigger if I can get away with it. I store these in the shop if they don't already have bugs. I still get some loss due to end checks and that's where the wax comes in. I plan to coat the ends on the longer pieces and on shorter pieces that will fit the frying pan coat the whole piece.
If you have time rough out the bowls and coat the end grains minimum. If it's an important piece of wood coat the whole thing and on woods like Apricot, apple etc I put in a paper sack.
I still end up storing an awful lot of wood outside because I simply don't have the space. consequently I still lose a lot but a lot less than before. Getting it off the ground,out of the sun and sealing the ends has done the most good.
This is how I do mine with the addition of adding paraffin to the mix which makes the wax draw up into the end grain without effecting the wood. I have also used PEG but found this less succesful
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post #12 of 14 Old 09-29-2008, 09:25 AM
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Also, if you do your sealing on the driveway, like I did last weekend, be sure to get that stack of freshly sealed logs off of the driveway as fast as possible - your wife will back the truck over them.

Is this is a common newby lesson I just learned?
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post #13 of 14 Old 09-29-2008, 06:56 PM
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Sorry for that random reply off-topic. I must explain. Last weekend I cut back a very old overgrown lilac, kept the best pieces for turning, sealed all the ends, and left them there in a nice neat pile for a few days while I tried to think of a spot to store them. Then I come to find the stack was run over and bark smeared along the concrete.
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post #14 of 14 Old 09-29-2008, 07:35 PM
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Originally Posted by Daveb View Post
I must explain.
No you didn't have to...just make sure you are not in the driveway sealing logs when she backs out.
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