Packing a wet bowl in Salt? - Woodworking Talk - Woodworkers Forum
 
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post #1 of 8 Old 07-04-2015, 12:40 AM Thread Starter
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Packing a wet bowl in Salt?

So this is just a brainstormed question. But has anyone tried using salt to dry a wet bowl?

Packing a bowl in Salt should draw the water out of it right?

I'm sure there a negatives associated with this but I'm curious to know if anyone has tried it.?
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post #2 of 8 Old 07-04-2015, 01:02 AM
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Some reading here:
http://maliposamusic.com/Stradwoodcuring.htm

Wise men speak because they have something to say; fools because they have to say something -Plato

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post #3 of 8 Old 07-04-2015, 01:03 AM
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Nope BUT I seen enough ham salt boxes to know salt and wood don't mix well....CORROSIVE with all that acid !!!

Have a Blessed and Prosperous day in Jesus's Awesome Love, Tim
........www.TSMFarms.com.......... John 3:16-21 ..........
Reveling God's awesome beauty while creating one of-a-kind flitches and heirlooms.
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post #4 of 8 Old 07-04-2015, 09:08 AM
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Nope BUT I seen enough ham salt boxes to know salt and wood don't mix well....CORROSIVE with all that acid !!!
Wow I would like to have some fried eggs a big piece of country ham, some red eye gravy, home made biscuits, and home made blackberry jam. Oh I almost forgot the real orange juice and coffee. What a way to start the day.

Don
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post #5 of 8 Old 07-04-2015, 02:20 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Ack View Post
So this is just a brainstormed question. But has anyone tried using salt to dry a wet bowl?

Packing a bowl in Salt should draw the water out of it right?

I'm sure there a negatives associated with this but I'm curious to know if anyone has tried it.?
Yes there are negatives such as the wood warping and splitting from drying too fast. No matter what method you use to speed up drying, all of them result in a steep moisture gradient from the exterior to the center of the wood. In other words, to rapidly force the water out of the wood necessarily means that the exterior will be very dry while the interior is very wet. This induces all sorts of stresses in the wood.

For woodturners, the aim in drying wood is to minimize those problems and the way to do that is to slow down the rate of drying ... NOT speed it up. That is why woodturners do things like coat the wood with Anchorseal (a paraffin wax emulsion) and store the wood in a cool place.

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The author of that piece states two suspect "facts" and from there launches into some very fanciful speculation especially concerning aqua regia which is a 1:3 mixture of concentrated nitric acid and sulfuric acid. Check out this MSDS for Aqua Regia if you have even the slightest inclination of actually doing something so foolish as using that highly dangerous, explosive, and toxic chemical. Homeland Security might also be interested in your intended use. Anyway, it has been used in refining gold although there are other methods that are probably better and certainly less hazardous. How he went from the alleged fact #2 to his nonsense rambling about "gold of kings" beats the heck out of me.

Anyway, his drying method has nothing at all to do with the two "facts" that he attributes to Stradivarius. However, his wood treating method is apparently just fine for the intended purpose of making wooden stringed instruments. Note that the wood is cut into thin strips which means that his method of drying is immaterial other than hinting that he has discovered Stradivarius' secret, but without actually saying it outright.

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post #6 of 8 Old 07-04-2015, 07:19 PM
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....using that highly dangerous, explosive, and toxic chemical. Homeland Security might also be interested in your intended use....
No kidding.
Back in the day, before pigmented stains became universally dominant, craftspeople used all kinds of chemicals to color wood, some which were astonishingly toxic and which would today throw the authorities into a state of panic

Not too many years ago, a popular staining process for pine, common especially in the restoration business and especially for pine floors, was a mixture of dissolved potassium permanganate crystals with some denatured alcohol. You just mopped it on and the floor would instantly turn bright purple, but which after about a minute would transform into the most lovely honey brown.
Some chemical combinations would involve two applications of different chemical solutions, the second, called a mordent, activating the first to give the color desired, and these processes were universal in all kinds of woodworking, from furniture to architectural work, until the early 20th century.

Very effective, and in most cases much more color-fast than any pigments, many of which tend to be fugitive with light exposure.

And since it was a chemical reaction wherein the color intensity is not proportional to the absorption rate, the process was free of the blotchy outcomes which often require pre-treatments to control with pigmented stains.

Back in the 70's and 80's you could buy all kinds of bulk chemicals for that purpose. I remember on a project down in Texas in the early 80's buying a 50 lb sack of potassium permanganate from a walk-in counter at a supply house in Houston, tossing it in the back of the truck, and driving off.
Try that nowadays and you'll have a SWAT team on your lawn in no time flat.

But anyway, as for drying as a woodturner, I'm with Bill.
Except for specialty applications (super thin turnings in green wood, say) there is nothing to be gained by speeding the process up and much to be gained by slowing it down. Much better to sequence one's woodturning in such a way that there is never a need to dry anything in a hurry.
Accelerated drying, and I include kiln-drying in this remark, almost always degrades either the working quality or the appearance of the wood.
Often both, and sometimes profoundly so.

Last edited by 9thousandfeet; 07-04-2015 at 07:32 PM.
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post #7 of 8 Old 07-04-2015, 10:05 PM
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"Much better to sequence one's woodturning in such a way that there is never a need to dry anything in a hurry."

I wasted much wood and time learning this lesson.
(But I also learned how to fill cracks :)
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post #8 of 8 Old 07-05-2015, 03:46 AM
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I grew up in Houston and in the early 60's when I was in high school, I got interested in taxidermy so I went down to the local drug store and bought some formaldehyde and some carbon tetrachloride. They were sitting on the shelf right next to rubbing alcohol, methyl ethyl ketone, trichloroethane, nitromethane, and a few other fun chemicals. Gloves? Why would I need gloves? The formaldehyde made my hands feel funny like leather gloves. The carbon text really dried out my skin and made it feel even funnier. I hear tell that kids today can't have that kind of fun

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