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post #1 of 23 Old 06-13-2011, 04:06 PM Thread Starter
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new to turning & where to start

I purchased a lathe,chuck, turning tools, sharpening grinder w/assc over the past 4 months. Took on a basic class at Woodwork, purchased 8 rough cut bowls. Now I just go out to my shop and look at the stuff and am dumb founded. Where to start and how to use this stuff. Had ideas and confidence before buying all this, and then get it, now feeling really stupid. Suggestions appreciated anytime. Brand new to this forum. Thanks
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post #2 of 23 Old 06-13-2011, 04:11 PM
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Before you do anything else buy this DVD. It will save you months of learning and frustration.
http://www.amazon.com/Turned-Bowls-Made-Easy-DVD/dp/B003SD3Q2K/ref=sr_1_1?ie=UTF8&qid=1307995666&sr=8-1Bill does almost everything the way that I do so it's easy for me to recommend him.
If you can find a club or another turner in your area. you will learn so much more with someone else's help to answer your questions. If you'll tell us where you are we may be able to help find a club or turner.
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post #3 of 23 Old 06-13-2011, 05:26 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by softaly2
I purchased a lathe,chuck, turning tools, sharpening grinder w/assc over the past 4 months. Took on a basic class at Woodwork, purchased 8 rough cut bowls. Now I just go out to my shop and look at the stuff and am dumb founded. Where to start and how to use this stuff. Had ideas and confidence before buying all this, and then get it, now feeling really stupid. Suggestions appreciated anytime. Brand new to this forum. Thanks
You tube was my best friend. It's amazing what people will record and post there.

Anybody can become a woodworker, but only a Craftsmen can hide his mistakes!
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post #4 of 23 Old 06-13-2011, 06:22 PM
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You can learn a lot from DVD’s and books, but practice, patience, and persistence will give you confidence and skills. Learning about wood is just as important as technique (grip, stance, tool control), tool rest height, lathe speed, and sharpening your tools.

Good luck and welcome to this very expensive hobby.
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post #5 of 23 Old 06-13-2011, 06:58 PM
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welcome to the site and to turning
im also new (still )
ive watched alot of youtube, just punch in woodturning or how to make a bowl, but,
these guys on here are the best, alot of knowledge floating around on here and alot of helpful tips
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post #6 of 23 Old 06-13-2011, 07:33 PM
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Hello and welcome.
Here is a site which lists quite a few videos (mostly youtube) which have been reviewed for appropriate (safe) methods. http://woodturningvideos.weebly.com/
Here is a list by Bob Hamilton (bobham5); he has about 40 separate videos with most being in the 4-5 segment range. Some easy, some more difficult.
http://www.youtube.com/results?search_query=bobham5&aq=f
Some of Bob’s are also listed at the weebly.com link
Along with Bill Grumbines video I feel this is one of the very best. Lyle Jamieson – “Bowl Basics, The Easy Way”. It is a two DVD disc set and presents the information in a more detailed way in my opinion. Either one should be a big help.
http://www.iamplify.com/store/product_details/WOOD-Magazine/Lyle-Jamieson---Bowl-Basics-The-Easy-Way/product_id/4375
This was just the first link I found, it may be available elsewhere for less.

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post #7 of 23 Old 06-13-2011, 08:12 PM
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You already got advise on where to get help.

My question is. When you bought your tools did you buy a Bowl Gouge? They are much longer and more heavy duty then the standard lathe tools. They also do not come in the set. Since you bought bowl blanks you will need a bowl gouge.
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post #8 of 23 Old 06-13-2011, 10:25 PM
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You can learn a lot on youtube but you can also learn bad ways of doing things. I've seen a lot of very poor turning skills on youtube. That's why I recommend Bill Grumbine's video. I know his ways are safe and won't get you hurt.
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post #9 of 23 Old 06-14-2011, 07:23 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by john lucas
You can learn a lot on youtube but you can also learn bad ways of doing things. I've seen a lot of very poor turning skills on youtube. That's why I recommend Bill Grumbine's video. I know his ways are safe and won't get you hurt.
Yep. There are some idiots out there.

Anybody can become a woodworker, but only a Craftsmen can hide his mistakes!
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post #10 of 23 Old 06-14-2011, 08:59 AM
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My advice would be to start small by just cutting up some 2x8 or so and practice centering the face plate, making the blank round on the lathe, cutting a tenon for the chuck, reversing the blank and cutting the inside of a bowl. This will give you a good feel for how the tools cut, how your attachments work, and what a tearout or catch feels like. The more you work with your tools the more comfortable you'll start to feel with how to approach the lathe and use the tools.

Practice, practice, practice. Good luck and post pictures of your work!

I want to die quietly in my sleep like my grandfather, not screaming in terror like the passengers of his car.
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post #11 of 23 Old 06-14-2011, 09:17 AM
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I agree with the others to use caution if following procedures on some of the youtube videos. The two I listed have a lot of different instructions/project and overall use safe turning practices. Some still do not use face shields or dust mask. The link to the Weebly web site is listed in a sticky at the AAW’s web site under Forums – How To, Tips, Techniques - Mustard Monster.


1+ on doing as Glidden stated and practice on some sections of 2 X 8’s. You may not get a good finish but if you get a catch it is only 50 cents worth of wood while you practice tool control. You do have a face shield I hope.
I would also suggest to start with your faceplate instead of a spur drive as you will have a much more secure grip on the wood.


1+ also on John’s suggestion of local turning clubs. Here is a link to AAW member clubs; there are about a dozen in Michigan. http://www.woodturner.org/community/...alChapters.asp

Good luck and keep us posted.

They who can give up essential liberty to obtain a little temporary safety, deserve neither liberty nor safety. Benjamin Franklin
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post #12 of 23 Old 06-14-2011, 11:36 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Glidden View Post
My advice would be to start small by just cutting up some 2x8 or so and practice centering the face plate, making the blank round on the lathe, cutting a tenon for the chuck, reversing the blank and cutting the inside of a bowl. This will give you a good feel for how the tools cut, how your attachments work, and what a tearout or catch feels like. The more you work with your tools the more comfortable you'll start to feel with how to approach the lathe and use the tools.

Practice, practice, practice. Good luck and post pictures of your work!

I would suggest starting with spindles to learn how the tools cut then move on to bowls.
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post #13 of 23 Old 06-14-2011, 12:27 PM
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Whether you start with spindles or faceplate work, I second (or third) the idea of using wood that doesn't mean a lot to you. If you get too concerned with the outcome of your piece you will be more likely to get anxious and frustrated. Make shavings, be safe and enjoy the process.
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post #14 of 23 Old 06-14-2011, 03:06 PM
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You also didn't say if you bought a bowl gouge. I wouldn't try to turn a bowl with a spindle gouge that comes with the sets.
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post #15 of 23 Old 06-14-2011, 11:46 PM
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I would like to add that most sets of turning tools do not have a bowl gouge but Penn State Industries has several sets with a bowl gouge. (Benjamin's Best )
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post #16 of 23 Old 06-15-2011, 12:07 AM
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Don't buy your tools in sets. There are usually a couple that you won't really use or of a size that you won't need.

That bowl was perfect right up until that last cut...
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post #17 of 23 Old 06-15-2011, 12:48 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Lilty View Post
I would like to add that most sets of turning tools do not have a bowl gouge but Penn State Industries has several sets with a bowl gouge. (Benjamin's Best )
I looked at the Benjamin's Best Bowl gouge it's Hard to tell from the picture but the price ($25.95) is way off from most bowl gouges. Mine is a Crown Tools bowl gouge was $70 - $80 by it's self and they had plenty that were more. The one I have is 2" longer but both are 5/8" so that is a big price difference.

I also have one that came in my set similar to the ones that PSI sells but it is no where's near a true bowl gouge. I'm still new at this but it's my understanding that a bowl gouge has to withstand more stress because of the way it has to cut to form the bowl. Look at pictures below.


Hey I could be wrong.
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post #18 of 23 Old 06-15-2011, 09:28 AM
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No it really doesn't have to withstand more stress. It probably will just because of the shape and size but ideally you should be cutting with it and there shouldn't be much stress.
Of course as a new turner you will get some catches and a bowl gouge will withstand them better than a small spindle gouge. A roughing gouge is also not good for bowls because of the shape it's easy to get a catch and the tang on that tool is too small to withstand a catch, they bend or break.
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post #19 of 23 Old 06-15-2011, 10:10 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by john lucas View Post
No it really doesn't have to withstand more stress. It probably will just because of the shape and size but ideally you should be cutting with it and there shouldn't be much stress.
Of course as a new turner you will get some catches and a bowl gouge will withstand them better than a small spindle gouge. A roughing gouge is also not good for bowls because of the shape it's easy to get a catch and the tang on that tool is too small to withstand a catch, they bend or break.
Wouldn't just the fact that you cut with a larger area and or multiple sides cause more stress or what ever you call it on the bowl gouge. They are usually made a lot more heavy duty then the other tools and it's made that way for a reason.
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post #20 of 23 Old 06-15-2011, 11:20 AM
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Bowl gouges are made heavier (of thicker diameter steel) so they can better withstand the reach into the depth of a bowl. With spindle turning, you never have to reach that far over the tool rest. With bowls there are times that you have the tool extending further past the rest.

That bowl was perfect right up until that last cut...
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