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post #1 of 4 Old 01-15-2010, 09:58 PM Thread Starter
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New guy with a question about threading

I have tried using thread chasers (Ray Iles) without much luck so far and I've wasted alot of expensive exotics in the process, So I made a threading jig hoping it will help. At least I can practice on domestic hardwoods. For those of you experienced at this I have a few of questions.
1. Using a threading jig, do you orient the grain parallel or perpendicular to the axis of the lathe?
2. Do you start with the male or female thread, and does it make a difference as far as sizing the opposite one?
3. What method do you use for sizing the opposite piece? Fred Holders book recommends threading the female part first, then turning a sizing tenon to fit in the internal and beveling out to a larger diameter at least twice the depth of the thread. Do you use this method, or have you arrived at a measurement difference for the internal/external parts for the tpi you're cutting.
Any advice would be appreciated.
Rick
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post #2 of 4 Old 01-15-2010, 10:34 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by RickM1 View Post
I have tried using thread chasers (Ray Iles) without much luck so far and I've wasted alot of expensive exotics in the process,
Practice with PVC. It thread nicely. I went into the shop each night and spent about 15 minutes cutting threads. I would try to cut a thread, turn it away and cut another. Then go on to the project I was doing that night. by the end of the week I could chase threads. Wood actually proved easier. You didn't say what wood you used. It has to be hard, Boxwood, Osage Orange, Cocobolo, Ebony. You have Fred's book so you have a good list.

So I made a threading jig hoping it will help. At least I can practice on domestic hardwoods. For those of you experienced at this I have a few of questions.
1. Using a threading jig, do you orient the grain parallel or perpendicular to the axis of the lathe?
I've done it both ways. It works better with the grain running parallel simply because the wood moves less so the lids fit better over time.
2. Do you start with the male or female thread, and does it make a difference as far as sizing the opposite one?
Done both, can't tell the difference.
3. What method do you use for sizing the opposite piece? Fred Holders book recommends threading the female part first, then turning a sizing tenon to fit in the internal and beveling out to a larger diameter at least twice the depth of the thread. Do you use this method, or have you arrived at a measurement difference for the internal/external parts for the tpi you're cutting.
Any advice would be appreciated.
Rick
To size it simply do a test. Turn a male thread. Measure the outside. Turn it away. Measure this size. Divide that by 2 and you have the depth of the thread. At least close. Now turn your thread on one part, lets say male thread. Make the other part larger by the dimension you measured. Put it on your threader. Adjust it until the cutter just touches the wood. Then crank it in by the number you arrived at. It might not be perfect. Do a test on a few scraps and change the depth you cut on them until you get a good fit.
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post #3 of 4 Old 01-18-2010, 12:29 AM Thread Starter
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Thanks for the advice, John. I'll follow it including the PVC for practicing with the chasers. I haven't given up on those things, they cost too much to just put on the shelf.
When threading domestic hardwoods with a jig, do you leave flats on the threads rather than sharp points that would be fragile? Also, do you ever use thin CA to strengthen them?
Rick
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post #4 of 4 Old 01-19-2010, 07:03 AM
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Most domestic hardwoods won't work for thread chasing. The tend to tearout badly. I do use a powered threader for those woods and have used CA to reduce tearout. I try to leave a small flat but have screwed up several times and cut points and they seem to work.
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