Need missing part, inherited Franklin lathe - Woodworking Talk - Woodworkers Forum
 
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post #1 of 20 Old 11-27-2015, 05:17 PM Thread Starter
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Need missing part, inherited Franklin lathe

As the title says... I inherited a Franklin 5053 and there doesn't seem to be a way to get the face plate off. From what I can assume there is a bolt missing that would create counter pressure for a wrench. You'll see in the pictures below.

Anyone know if there is a specific part that goes there or if it's simply a trip to home Depot? Anyone know the size bolt I need?
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post #2 of 20 Old 11-27-2015, 05:40 PM
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In pic 3 there appears to be a hex nut behind the faceplate. I would hold it with a wrench and try to remove the faceplate with a strap wrench.
There appears to be a small pin (spindle lock) just above the hex nut. Try to push it in and rotate the spindle and see if it engages. If so you won't need a wrench for the hex nut.

They who can give up essential liberty to obtain a little temporary safety, deserve neither liberty nor safety. Benjamin Franklin
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post #3 of 20 Old 11-27-2015, 06:32 PM Thread Starter
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Tried the pin, it locks the silver wheels that turn the pulley lock but the spindle does not.
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post #4 of 20 Old 11-27-2015, 07:51 PM
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https://www.youtube.com/watch?featur...uVyAkNwo#t=358

Grab the pulley with a strap wrench and then apply a lever like this at :47 in the video:
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=hGNePqEj_Vs

The answer to your question will only be as detailed and specific as the question is detailed and specific. Good questions also include a sketch or a photo that illustrates your issue. (:< D)

Last edited by woodnthings; 11-27-2015 at 07:54 PM.
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post #5 of 20 Old 11-27-2015, 09:07 PM
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Assuming the faceplate has been on there for years you may also need to soak the faceplate in penetrating oil before it will budge. Faceplates can sometimes be nasty to get off.
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post #6 of 20 Old 11-28-2015, 01:31 AM
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This is why I started using those plastic washers between whatever I am mounting on the spindle and the base of the spindle. It really helps prevent this--as does not leaving your attachment on for days...or years at a time. Just my 2 cents.

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post #7 of 20 Old 11-28-2015, 01:47 AM
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The video basically showed my suggestion. Instead of a pipe, a board can be used with the two bolts permanently attached to the board. Keep it as your permanent faceplate removal tool. If at all possible, avoid using penetrating oil because it will also get into the Morse taper socket and will be a mess to clean it out.

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post #8 of 20 Old 11-28-2015, 05:48 AM
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I have used penetrating oil many times. Works great. If it has a Morse taper just clean it out with mineral spirits and paper towel if it gets inside. Apply penetrating oil and tap on the faceplate. do this several times a day until it breaks free. Sometimes takes a few days or longer. I had a rusted pistol that took almost a year to free up the hammer but being the determined dog I am I finally got everything moving and was able to dissassemble it.
The wood is a good idea. If that fails maybe you can put bolts through the rear and use a piece of steel as leverage between the bolts.
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post #9 of 20 Old 11-28-2015, 10:51 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Liebertron View Post
Tried the pin, it locks the silver wheels that turn the pulley lock but the spindle does not.
Something seems odd. If the pulley (wheels) locks and the spindle turns then the set screw from the pulley to the spindle must be loose.
Most of the time there is one or two set screws on the pulley to lock it to the spindle; usually at the bottom of a groove(s).
Some times the spindle lock (pin) will stay locked and sometimes you have to hold it down or it will spring back out automatically.

They who can give up essential liberty to obtain a little temporary safety, deserve neither liberty nor safety. Benjamin Franklin
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post #10 of 20 Old 11-29-2015, 08:56 PM Thread Starter
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Happy to report the faceplate is off! I tried all the suggestions and the lever ended up working but not until I hit it with the blowtorch to loosen things up. Popped off pretty easy after that.

Does anyone have recommendations on a system to put on the lathe to easily grab work pieces? The nova system looks neat though I'm not sure what I need to get started....

Thanks for the help, couldn't do it with out you!!
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post #11 of 20 Old 11-29-2015, 10:24 PM
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If you are asking for a recommendation on which chuck to get, I can highly recommend the Oneway Talon. It is built like a tank and there is a very large assortment of jaws to choose from besides the #2 jaws that come with the chuck. Oneway offers your choice of profiled or dovetail jaws. For most things I like the profiled jaws, but I also have dovetail jaws for special purposes where removal/reinstallation alignment is critical. I also use Vicmarc chucks. They are expensive, but in my opinion have the most precise and tight fitting scroll gear and jaws.

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post #12 of 20 Old 11-29-2015, 10:28 PM
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I second the Oneway chuck, but I doubt you want to spend more on a chuck than your lathe.
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post #13 of 20 Old 11-29-2015, 11:17 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by hwebb99 View Post
I second the Oneway chuck, but I doubt you want to spend more on a chuck than your lathe.
Eventually, he will get a more expensive bigger lathe and then the feng shui of the woodturning world will be back in harmony.

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post #14 of 20 Old 11-30-2015, 08:01 AM Thread Starter
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Would my lathe be considered midi mini etc? I'm having trouble figuring out what size to get... Is there a certain chuck to start with or is a chuck a chuck and you add jaws for different pieces of wood?
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post #15 of 20 Old 11-30-2015, 04:59 PM
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A midi lathe is typically 12" swing and maybe 16" between centers. Yours borders on a full size lathe, though 3/4 hp is on the low end of that.

For a 12" lathe a chuck that's 100 mm is adequate. You need to know the thread size of your spindle, example 1" 8TPI is by far the most common. Then ask yourself how much you want to spend...

Something like this is a good start -

https://www.woodturnerscatalog.com/p...ck-8-Piece-Set

Chucks are for gripping things - there are also spur centers for turning spindles, and you should get a "live" center for the tail stock end.

Dave in CT, USA
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post #16 of 20 Old 11-30-2015, 06:01 PM
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I highly recommend you get a chuck with an adapter not a direct thread. A direct thread will only fit a lathe with the same spindle thread as the one it fits. An adapter chuck for about $30 for a new adapter will fit any lathe.
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post #17 of 20 Old 12-04-2015, 09:28 PM Thread Starter
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Hey guys, I ended up with a the nova g3 as woodcraft had it on sale. Came with 50mm jaws and I got an ice cream scoop kit. Of course, I start going at it and all of my tools needed sharpening, so I got a slow speed grinder and am learning two skills now. Free handed the tools and working great!! Couldn't have done it without you guys, thanks!
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post #18 of 20 Old 12-04-2015, 10:57 PM
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Free hand sharping takes years to master. You will likely give up turning before you even had a chance with poorly sharpened tools. Poorly sharpened tools and incorrect usage is a recipe for failure. I'm not trying to be an A hole or be harsh, but just trying to help. I strongly recommend you purchase a jig. The Oneway wolverine jig would be my first choice. I have had had one from day one and there was practically no learning curve.
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post #19 of 20 Old 12-05-2015, 10:59 AM Thread Starter
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Damn you! Alright, I know enough to know I don't know anything, I'll buy the jig
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post #20 of 20 Old 12-05-2015, 11:21 AM
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based on threads here...

This won't be your last lathe, so a sharpening jig will be a lifetime investment.

The answer to your question will only be as detailed and specific as the question is detailed and specific. Good questions also include a sketch or a photo that illustrates your issue. (:< D)
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