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post #1 of 11 Old 06-10-2008, 11:26 PM Thread Starter
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NE Presentation

This turning is a presentation of a ne willow wet wood bowl. My aim here is to take this very white wood and turn it to look darker by tinting the varnish to apply several coats, but mostly I want to turn this bowl to be the thinnest ne bowl I ever turned. I wanted to present this bowl to you, my friends, on the turning forums not by just turning the bowl and posting, but present it on this platform I turned and I would present the bowl in tandem from the platform. The bowl is 8" long 5" wide and it is 3/32" think every place except a dime sized area in the middle of the bowl, which I left 1/8" to add stability to the bowl. Also along the bark line I left it 1/8" thick so the bowl wouldn't dry or twist and possibly shed the bark. Before I put the finishes on the bowl was mostly all translucent and could be seen through by a light. Wanted to show this with the help of a light bulb, but the wood was wet and had to be sealed or it would be destroyed in a couple days. Let me know what you think.Mitch
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post #2 of 11 Old 06-11-2008, 04:24 AM
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Wow, that is impressive! Very striking, and quite beautiful!

Now, just to make sure: The bowl is not mounted on that platform, is it? Its just resting there for the photo, right?
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post #3 of 11 Old 06-11-2008, 07:21 AM
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Very nice Mitch. The bowl has a good shape and well executed. I have to argue with your statement about leaving the wood thick at the edge to prevent warping. Wood will warp as it drys and will move even if 8" thick. You can't stop it. The best bet to keep it from cracking is to make the wood the same thickness throughout. The foot of course has to be the exception but I usually reverse turn the piece so I can thin the wood inside the lip of the foot so that more of the piece will be the same thickness. This is on wood turned totally green. Pieces that have been roughed and dryed and then returned don't follow this rule. At least not as much. They will move seasonally but won't move enough to crack so you can leave them with wildly different thicknesses and get buy with it. That's been my experience anyway.
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post #4 of 11 Old 06-11-2008, 02:19 PM Thread Starter
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John
Thank you John. Your reply on the statement I made about wood moving is exactly the kind of replies I like to get from people that know. Having said that though, I think I disagree. I left the ends 1/8" thick because I believed I needed a little more strength out there to make sure I didn't bend the ends and break off the bark. If I tried cutting it to 1/32" , like the rest of the bowl I don't think I would of gotten away with it. I don't think I was as concerned about the wood moving as much as I was about it bending and breaking. It is the sealers job to prevent the piece from moving , wood will move even if 8" thick if it is drying improperly.It must seal the inside and outside of a piece so equally so as to let the piece continue to dry, buttt equally on both sides, untill eventually the piece is completely dry throughout. I am sure you have turned a piece of very wet wood and noticed how the wood begins to dry immediately on the outside? Inside it is still as wet as it was outside. This creates uneven drying patterns. As days go by this unequal drying is what causes all kinds of unwanted movements and eventually splitting breaking etc. Seal it properly and make the drying continue equally inside and outside and your chances for success are much greater. This isn't a hard, fast rule though. Turn a piece that has lived it's life under great stress and this solution sometimes won't work. Example a branch on an apple tree spends it's life twisting in the wind, under stress, you cut it and relieve the stress at that point and it is going to do bad things. Sorry for the rant John but the reason I liked your reply is, it made me think, something an old retired guy doesn't always get a chance to do. Being retired, I miss going head to head with workers or friends on a daily basis. Maybe I am wrong but this is my opinion. Mitch
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post #5 of 11 Old 06-11-2008, 02:28 PM Thread Starter
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Night Mill Bill
Thanks for the reply Bill. I like the way you broke down your name place of work etc. Your right Bill. I made the presentation stand just for the reason of presenting the bowl. It would look pretty bland if just presented by it's self so I turned the stand. Probably will use it again sometimes, later on. The box I turned and placed on a similiar stand is part of the entire box though. Thanks again, hope to hear from you again. Mitch
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post #6 of 11 Old 06-12-2008, 02:30 AM
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Mitch,

When I first saw your pics, I thought you had made one of these:

http://www.globalegyptianmuseum.org/...ry.aspx?id=174

I had seen them before in our local Carnegie Museum (or somewhere, my brain works oddly sometimes - when it does at all). I had always wondered about them, as they really dont look like a comfortable way to sleep. I presume someone invented the Pillow shortly after these got around...
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post #7 of 11 Old 06-12-2008, 07:03 PM Thread Starter
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Bill
It does look something like that, doesn't it? Mitch
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post #8 of 11 Old 07-01-2008, 05:56 PM
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Or a potato chip. Barbeque flavored. Very nice work. Leaves the rest of us something to aspire to.
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post #9 of 11 Old 07-01-2008, 10:25 PM
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Mitch you are correct in that even drying is more important than even thickness. I teach people to turn to an even thickness because that helps promote even drying. I think you are correct in that a 1/32" rim with bark is really fragile and I believe you made the right decision.
I was refering mostly to the fact that wood will move no matter what we do. coating both sides evenly helps slow down the wood movement but I've found that it will still move, sometimes it takes days or sometimes a month depending on species and thickness.
I will certainly agree that every wood moves differently, some not at all and some all over the place. Especially reactive wood like the limb section you talked about.
I like your bowl. I don't turn thin anymore because people think of them as being too fragile and don't buy them. I make them thin enough to feel good but not thin enough to appear fragile.
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post #10 of 11 Old 07-02-2008, 01:59 AM Thread Starter
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John
Thank You John and this last statement I can agree with 100 percent.I didn't know that people shy away from anything that looks fragile when it comes to buying. Will keep that in mind if I ever get good enough to sell my turnings. Thanks Mitch
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post #11 of 11 Old 07-02-2008, 02:01 AM Thread Starter
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Thanks buddy. My favorite kind of potato chip too, when I used to be able to eat them. Mitch
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