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post #1 of 15 Old 03-09-2009, 12:28 AM Thread Starter
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My Version,CiL

This is a picture of my version of the popular CiL easy rougher. I made it last night just for fun. The original CiL is stainless steel but I made mine from steel. The shield is from the tool I bought and the only thing I made was the body and the handle. This is a good addition to my tools since it cuts every bit as good as the tool I purchased. I used the same carbide cutter. I bought 4 carbide cutters and now won't need to change cutters as often. Mitch
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post #2 of 15 Old 03-09-2009, 08:55 AM
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Mitch,
Looks good. I have never seen one of these up close. Do you use it mainly to round out spindle type blanks? Also, Do you actually look through the shield or can you see over it?
Mike Hawkins
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post #3 of 15 Old 03-09-2009, 03:11 PM Thread Starter
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Thanks Mike. The way I mostly use my CiL easy roughing tool is to take ,say a large branch of a tree about 5" diameter and 15" long and rough it out to a cylinder.This is how I started when I first bought it, but you can shape bowls completely on the outside and inside of the bowl. You can't believe how much and how fast this tool can hog off the wood. Amazing. I didn't like it at first when I bought it but after a bit of a learning curve. I like it enough to want to make another one, which I did and for just the cost of the cutter, under $14. I paid over $200 for my original tool, handle and cutters. Actually both of these are good deals for what you get. Craig Jackson is now in the process of coming out, in April with another tool ne calls The CiO and is named the easy finisher I think. It is actually a lot like the Hunter finishing tools. Craigs is made from square steel but Hunters is from round so the presentation of the cutting edge to the wood is entirely different. As far as your question about whether you actually look through the shield Mike, let me say this, it isn't a matter of seeing through it as much as it is using the shield to protect yourself from the flying debris when your roughing.It is amazing how fast this thing cuts and the velocity of the shavings and bark that comes straight toward your face is incredible, the shield deflects this. It is along the same lines as, why do turners wear gloves when hollowing and the debris is so hot as to be uncomfortable. I am to the point now that I have a little more skill using the tool so I now like it a bunch and I am looking forward to Craig coming out with his new easy finisher tool next month. You can check this out on You tube under his site, www,easytoolworks.com, he has a small video clip about his new tool. Mitch
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post #4 of 15 Old 03-09-2009, 04:01 PM
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Mitch The C10 is a round carbide tool but flat on top. Nothing like the Hunter tool other than the fact that they are both round and carbide. the Hunter tool has a 7 degree bevel on the outside and is beveled on the inside and polished so it has a cutting edge.
The Ci0 looks like it has a about a 45 degree bevel and flat on top. I'm guessing the edge is similar to your square tool. It looks like it works very affectively.
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post #5 of 15 Old 03-09-2009, 05:10 PM Thread Starter
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John Lucas
Thank you for your response John and your exactly right about the two different tools they look much the same but they don't operate the same as far as presenting the cutting edge of the tool to the work. Some say the Hunter is much more aggressive, I wouldn't know about that since I only used his very small cutter I got with my Elbow hollowing tool. Whatever the difference between the two different tools I want to make one of each. I am going to order a few Hunter carbide cutters today. I wanted to ask you if you would please repost that picture of the Hunter tool you posted several months ago,and include whatever the comment you made at the time about how you attached the cutter to the rod. Would you please? I wanted to mention to you about the forge I have been wanting to get forever. Wanted to make mine but finding the materials made me figure I could buy one much better and not too much more expensive. I kept thinking of that coal forge you have. Anyways I finally ordered and received an atmospheric forge with two burners that will reach 2300 degrees F in no time flat. It is actually a knife makers forge with welding capabilities at 2300 degrees. Knowing your well versed in most things related to turning, would you respond with any comments you might have about atmospheric forges, good and or bad? One thing in particular I am concerned about right now is, how do you control the heat from getting so high when you only need 1470 F to harden turning tools? I know there are digital meters to read internal forge heat but is it necessary? How about if I heat the rood till cherry red, take it from the fire and hold it from the flames till the temperature cools off down to 1470 by constantly touching the tool to a magnet? When it is down to the point it is no longer anti magnetic plunge into oil. What is your opinion? Thanks John. Mitch

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post #6 of 15 Old 03-09-2009, 08:44 PM
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Hey Mitch! Alright first off what does CiL stand for? I'm anal when it comes to abbreviations, always have to know what they are for. I had a training class years ago for my job and the instructor made us pay a dime everytime we used letters and didn't follow it up with the words. (cd = compact disc) We had a hell of pizza party at the end of the two week class.

that tools looks awesome. I can't quite tell but is the handle flat wood or is that still the steel and the picture just makes it appear to be wood or at least wood colored?

Sounds like that thing really works well. Good for you! Glad your tool making skillls continue to improve!

John
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post #7 of 15 Old 03-09-2009, 09:27 PM
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My version ,Ci1

WTG Mitch,looks like it should do the job.Has anybody seen the video of Craig using the CiO.man it was awesome,makes me wanna throw all my D T gouges away,(just kiddin Doug)its on you tube.
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post #8 of 15 Old 03-09-2009, 10:35 PM Thread Starter
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Thanks for the kind words in your response, I can always count on you buddy. Yes this can be an awesome tool but needs to be used a while to learn its good and bad points. The handle is nothing special, I made the center little thicker so I can grip firmly when doing a lot of roughing. I send you a couple pictures so you can see the two ends a little better. As far as what the CiL means I don't have a clue other than to say the guy who makes it has a first name of Craig. He is making a new tool for finishing the inside of bowls that look promiseing. I won't be buying this tool but I am going to buy the cutters and make my own. This one I made cost me $14 to make my own. Thanks again John, Mitch
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post #9 of 15 Old 03-09-2009, 10:45 PM Thread Starter
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woodsman
Thanks woodsman and yes it does truly do the job, I am very happy with the one I bought and the one I made. The video clip that Craig has on you tube showing the CiO finishing tool does look very promising. I saw it a few days ago. I will be making a couple of them too. Keep in touch if you can and thanks again. Mitch
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post #10 of 15 Old 03-09-2009, 10:47 PM
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Hey Mitch, very nice. Are the cutter heads replaceable? I'm assuming yes. How do they attach? Where do you buy just the cutterhead?

John
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post #11 of 15 Old 03-09-2009, 10:56 PM Thread Starter
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jdixon
John, yes the carbide cutter heads are replaceable, there are four numbered sides 1 thru 4 that you can use, this is neat and you don't forget what side you are using if you take the cutteroff and put back on. You can buy the cutters on Craigs site for $13.99 each. Www.easytoolworks.com I believe it is. If I can ever be of any help to you just ask. There is a screw to attach the cutter. You need to drill a hole and tap it then screw on the cutter. Easy. Mitch

Last edited by Mitch Cholewinski; 03-09-2009 at 10:59 PM.
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post #12 of 15 Old 03-10-2009, 01:21 AM
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Hi Mitch. I don't usually respond in these threads due to my limited experience with different tools I figure I don't know about what I speak of I know it must feel good to work with a tool you made yourself. I do have a question more general though. I was going through my tool box the other day and found a carbide tile cutting wheel, could these be incorporated into a useful turning tool somehow?

Tim
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post #13 of 15 Old 03-10-2009, 02:34 AM Thread Starter
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Tim
Well I am glad you responded to my post this time buddy. Doesn't matter if your experience is limited with cutting tools or not and your especially welcome to any of my posts. How else is a guy going to learn if he doesn't ask questions? Only one dumb question and that is the one you were ashamed to ask. I wish I could help you about using the tool you have and turning it into a useful turning tool but I don't know what the tool even looks like so I hesitatate to even try. I have a question for you though Tim. Why in the world even try to do that when you can buy carbide cutters , state of the art cutters from several different suppliers and just cost you under $14 a cutter.That is what this tool cost me to make. I got the steel from a friend and bought the cutters. Let me give you another example of what you can do. Buy a 5/8" round rod from Home Depot , about seven dollars and don't worry about what kind of steel it is. Buy a carbide cutter from Hunter his #5 cutter is good, you will have to check the price here. Here is my point now Tim. All you need to do is buy the proper tap and drill bit to fit the cutter. Drill a hole in the bar and then tap it and install the cutter. after you do that you will need to grind the rod under the cutter so there is clearance under the cutter and the bar, reinstall the cutter and your the owner of a great new you made turning tool. Can't get no easier than that. Try it once, you can do it if you want to try and don't give up. Mitch
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post #14 of 15 Old 03-10-2009, 08:36 PM
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Mitch I can't talk about other types of forges because the only type I've used so far is a coal forge. I did buy some fire bricks today to that I can build a small propane forge for heating knife blanks or when I need to make bends in larger work and don't want to fire up the coal forge. I've had so much work to do this year I haven't even touched the forge for some real blacksmithing. All I've done is heat treat small tools.
I mount the hunter cutters 35 degrees to the left ( think 2 to 8 oclock). I think Mike mounts them at 45 degrees. You end up tilting them to find the angle you like best anyway. Here's the video I did of tool usage.
http://www.youtube.com/user/john59lucas
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post #15 of 15 Old 03-11-2009, 01:38 AM Thread Starter
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John Lucas
Thanks John I understand what you mean by other forges. Your video was most helpful though but I am pretty much hearing impaired now and can't hear when anyone talks on the PC. One thing I watched to see is just where you find the sweet spot when cutting and you say ride the bevel and pick up the sweet spot at two and eight oclock. I did wonder about that Soon as I get my cutters I'm ready to make mine, then I want to make a Cio finisher then back to making the gouges now that I have a forge. BTW John I sent you a personal message about a forge. I would appreciate it if you looked at this forge. Thank You Mitch
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