My Nova G3 has arrived (question on it). - Woodworking Talk - Woodworkers Forum
 
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post #1 of 19 Old 07-05-2015, 05:37 PM Thread Starter
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My Nova G3 has arrived (question on it).

Yes, I was quite surprised. The initial, stated, ETA was for the 9th. Then, I received notice that the arrival date had been changed to Monday (tomorrow). But it turned out that one of our daughters brought it in this morning. Apparently, it had been delivered yesterday evening, and we didn't see it upon on late night return home. Anyway, it is here.

However, I have a question. I will insert the link to the one I bought, again, and ask that you navigate down to the product description (http://www.amazon.com/dp/B00IIRRHY4/...ywords=Nova+g3). In the description there is wording on the 'dovetail' feature, but I see only straight-sided securing walls on the two sets of jaws. I had thought that they would have incorporated the anged dovetail configuration, for the purpose of greater holding strength of the attached stock, for turning. As such, I was prepared to purchase (as soon as possible) a chisel which would aid in cutting such an angle on a wooden jam attachment.

I don't know; but maybe the mentioned dovetail just might be in reference to the bottom (screw in) section of the jaws. That part DOES have a dovetailed appearance, but ALL of the scroll chucks that I have seen have that shape - whether it was mentioned in the description, or not.

I just want to make certain that I have just as I am supposed to have. Please inform.

Advanced thanks,
Nathan


UPDATE:

My apologies for the above error. I only had time, before, to look at the items through their plastic wrappings. It DID appear that the walls of the jaws were straight sided. However, now - upon much closer inspection - I am able to see that those walls ARE slightly dovetailed. I guess I had just thought that the angular effect would have been a bit more pronounced.

There IS a bit of a problem, though. I found that the threaded insert was NOT included in the package. It also appears that someone had this chuck, before, as the package showed clear signs of having been opened, and taped up again. One of the plastic retaining straps had also been severed. It could be that a previous purchaser forgot to include the threaded insert into the package, upon its return.

I like buying from Amazon, but this one was the last one they had, and there is no definite outlook as to when/if they will be getting more.

Last edited by NLAlston; 07-05-2015 at 07:01 PM. Reason: Updated info.
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post #2 of 19 Old 07-05-2015, 09:18 PM Thread Starter
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It is almost with embarrassment that I am going to express something, but I have never been one to stand against admitting to a mistake.

I recently contacted Amazon, to see if there was any way that my situation, with this purchase, could be satisfied outside of my refunding the device. The Amazon Rep contacted the third party seller, to see if the 'missing' component could be expedited out to me. The Rep was informed that the insert had ALREADY been installed.

Now, all I knew is what -and how - the listing had shown, which translated into my expecting to see the 'individual' elements. WOW!!, what a blunder on MY part .

Even though someone MIGHT have had it, before, and returned it - everything seems to be in good & proper working order.

Just a couple of more purchases (Jacobs chuck, parting tool, bowl chisel and tool for creating the angular profile on the tenon's end) and I should be in good form to REALLY GET BUSY .
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post #3 of 19 Old 07-05-2015, 09:51 PM
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The SKU# 48232 chuck is supposed to include an insert for 1 X 8 threaded spindles. They either sent the wrong one or like you say, the package may have been opened. Send it back and get it from a reputable source. I don't buy anything from Amazon if it is fulfilled by one of their "partners".

Don't know what you paid, but Craft Supplies has it for $147.95

EDIT: I see that everything is OK.

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Last edited by Bill Boehme; 07-05-2015 at 09:57 PM.
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post #4 of 19 Old 07-05-2015, 10:18 PM
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Be sure to put that rascal on your lathe and then run the lathe to ensure there's no runout. The chuck and the jaws should run true without any measurable wobble or instability.
Using the chuck key, run the jaws all the way open and closed a couple of times to check smooth operation.Get a chunk of wood and tighten the jaws down on that wood to ensure a good grip without any internal slippage.

If the package has the appearance of being opened before you got it, and perhaps returned by a previous buyer, there could be a reason for that.

I suspect the chances are that it's fine, but a careful check is never a bad idea with new purchases, regardless of vendor

Oh, a quick tip. When you mount the chuck (or a faceplate or anything similar) on your spindle, check to be sure the threads on the spindle and inside the chuck are clean. Quickly check this, visually, every time you mount anything.

It doesn't take much in the way of small debris trapped in the threads, or especially anything sticky (wood pitch is an example of that, and is not exactly uncommon to find around a woodshop), to make the chuck astonishingly difficult to remove. Don't ask me how I know that.

Also, just put the chuck on by hand until it the threads gently bottom out. Spinning the chuck onto the threads super fast so the threads bottom out with a bang will put the chuck on way too tight and will also give you removal problems.

Last edited by 9thousandfeet; 07-05-2015 at 10:34 PM.
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post #5 of 19 Old 07-05-2015, 10:28 PM Thread Starter
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Quote:
Originally Posted by 9thousandfeet View Post
Be sure to put that rascal on your lathe and then run the lathe to ensure there's no runout. The chuck and the jaws should run true without any measurable wobble or instability.
Using the chuck key, run the jaws all the way open and closed a couple of times to check smooth operation.Get a chunk of wood and tighten the jaws down on that wood to ensure a good grip without any internal slippage.

If the package has the appearance of being opened before you got it, and perhaps returned by a previous buyer, there could be a reason for that.

I suspect the chances are that it's fine, but a careful check is never a bad idea with new purchases, regardless of vendor.
Thanks.

I DID install it on my lathe - but with jaws closed - to check its manner of spin, but did not think to run with jaws full open. Also, I would have never thought to run it with wood chucked in, owing to the fact that I have no round stock available. I was under the presence of mind that not only would round stock be required, but that the angled end of the tenon was necessitated, for the purpose of mating with the device's dovetail slant.

I'll go downstairs, now, and try to see how well those issues will fare.
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post #6 of 19 Old 07-05-2015, 10:47 PM
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You can tighten these kinds of chuck on square stock if you want, and crunch them down pretty darn tight if need be.
And dovetail jaws will certainly grip round stock fairly securely without there being a dovetail shaped tenon which fits the jaws precisely.

A fit which precisely matches the dovetail profile of the jaws is a necessity for accuracy and maximum holding power, but these chucks are much more versatile than that.

Mostly, though, I was suggesting a chunk of wood so you could test the internal gearing of the chuck by cranking it closed against some resistance to ensure there's nothing amiss internally. It's not necessary to run the lathe with that test chunk in the chuck.

You do have a full face shield, I'm assuming. If not, you must get one.

Last edited by 9thousandfeet; 07-05-2015 at 10:51 PM.
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post #7 of 19 Old 07-05-2015, 10:59 PM Thread Starter
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@9Kfeet,

I just finished doing a fully closed (again) and wide open jaw run - a couple of times - to check out the G3's operation. It appeared to travel as smooth as silk. As earlier mentioned, though, I had no wood stock sizable
appropriately enough for insertion into the chuck. Tomorrow, I will pick up a length of 4"x4" to work on my jam chuck. Hopefully, the tool needed to turn the angled edge on the tenon wont necessitate TOO deep of a reach into my (presently) shallow pockets .

If I find that there WOULD be a problem, with it handling chucked wood, those two, lastly, mentioned purposes won't be a waste. Because if sending the G3 back would be warranted, I'd just buy another - from somewhere else - and would still need that stock, and the tool.
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post #8 of 19 Old 07-05-2015, 11:09 PM
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You don't need a special tool to turn the dovetail tenon. It isn't that hard to do with several different tools. It doesn't need to be that precise.
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post #9 of 19 Old 07-05-2015, 11:16 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by NLAlston View Post
Hopefully, the tool needed to turn the angled edge on the tenon wont necessitate TOO deep of a reach into my (presently) shallow pockets
You don't need to buy a specialty tool dedicated to turning the dovetail profile.
I use a small spindle gouge. A lot of turners use a skew, flat on the toolrest as a scraper, to refine the dovetail profile. There's a whole thread on this comment board somewhere about that very thing. I've forgotten now all the suggestions, but there were quite a few and they all looked to me like they would work just fine.

If you feel you must have a dedicated dovetail tool, you could get a cheap scraper (Benjamin's Best or Bodger, say) and then grind it to the right angle and dedicate it for that purpose. Cheaper than buying one ready made, I'm sure.
Hell, you could probably re-grind a big rusty old screwdriver into something that would work ok for now, and save your money for more versatile tools.
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post #10 of 19 Old 07-06-2015, 12:43 AM
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I agree with 9000, you don't need a special tool for the dovetail; an old flat screwdriver or similar tool will do. IIRC the angle is 15*.

Also, and very important, for your jaws you do not cut a dovetail for a tenon/spigot, only for a recess (expansion) mount. If you do not have the manual go here.
http://www.teknatool.com/products/Ch.../G3_Manual.pdf
Scroll down to "Spigot Operation" and check the last line in "Forming Spigot" ...it is in all Capital letters.

For well presented videos check out the three on chucks, tenons & recesses by Stuart Batty. They are well worth the time at 10-15 minutes each.
https://vimeo.com/woodturning/videos...rmat:thumbnail

If you are just starting Stance is a fundamental starting point. Stuart also has three on stance in the same group of videos.

Sorry I misinterpreted your pics before. I can see the curve in #4 now. Skews, like #5, are normally ground 70* across the flat of the tool. Since you hold it from your side this places the cutting edge at about 45* to the wood. Yours may already be 70* but it just appears almost straight across like a scraper may be.

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post #11 of 19 Old 07-06-2015, 01:14 AM
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Go to the big box store and buy some 2X4's. Rip them into 2X2's that are about 8 or 9 inches long. Get a spur drive and a live center if you don't already have them. Use your spindle roughing gouge to get them round and then put a tenon on one (or both) ends that is sized to fit the chuck.

First exercise: Chuck a piece in the chuck and bring up the live center to the other end and then practice with your spindle gouge and skew (the skew has a steep learning curve so be prepared for some very exciting catches). Watch some videos on using the skew before you try it for yourself.

Second exercise: if your chuck is large enough, chuck up one of the square 2X2's, bring up the live center to the other end and just practice. This exercise is more difficult because the wood will not slip when you get a catch as it can in the previous exercise using a spur or a steb or a dead cup center to drive your piece of wood.

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post #12 of 19 Old 07-06-2015, 01:46 AM Thread Starter
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I have to, first, say that you guys are AWESOME. I cannot BELIEVE the generous amount of attention, and help that you all have afforded me. I can only hope to be as helpful to someone else, after I have gained knowledge and expertise.

Yes (to the one poster), I indeed DO have a face shield. That is the FIRST thing I bought after my purchase of that old Shopsmith.

Sometime, tomorrow, I will put my Jet Mini - and G3 - into duty mode. I know that I will be up all night, watching as many videos as I can. I know that Rockler, oftentimes, have free instructional presentations, and I am going to check to see when their next session on lathes will be.

But you exceptional folk have given me quite a bit of very valuable information which will, indeed, give me a decent push off.

I am EXTREMELY grateful.
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post #13 of 19 Old 07-06-2015, 06:32 AM
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NLAlston, did you know that you can buy used products on Amazon also? When you click on the description if you look to the right side it says "other sellers" well some (not all) of these are selling used products.
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post #14 of 19 Old 07-06-2015, 09:54 AM Thread Starter
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Originally Posted by dirty-curty View Post
NLAlston, did you know that you can buy used products on Amazon also? When you click on the description if you look to the right side it says "other sellers" well some (not all) of these are selling used products.
Thanks, DC. I will certainly keep that in mind, on my next buying episode.
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post #15 of 19 Old 07-07-2015, 04:06 PM
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The box stores also have 1 1/2 or 2" poplar blanks that are great for practice.Reasonably priced too.

I think It's time to ding a ding dang my dang along ling long.
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post #16 of 19 Old 07-07-2015, 05:15 PM Thread Starter
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The box stores also have 1 1/2 or 2" poplar blanks that are great for practice.Reasonably priced too.
I did see those, when I went to Lowes, yesterday. But I wound up getting a 2"x4", figuring to get more practice pieces out of it.

It also happens that I called Rockler, to inquire as to their next free instructional class on lathes, and found that they have one on the 18th of this month. This one focuses open turning, which is something that I've already done, but I can learn even more about it.

I was also informed that they offer private classes (at a cost, of course) that I am certainly going to gain more information on.

One thing that I really want to get an immediate handle on are the speed ranges for different turning applications. I wish that I had bought a lathe with the electronic speed control, when I bought my Jet mini, but I will adapt to the belt changes - until such time when I can afford myself a SUPER lathe .
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post #17 of 19 Old 07-07-2015, 07:26 PM
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If there is a woodturning club near you, then you can usually get hands on mentoring for free (or the cost of joining) that is as good or even better instruction offered at a Rockler's or Woodcraft store where you pay big bucks.

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post #18 of 19 Old 07-07-2015, 10:37 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Bill Boehme
If there is a woodturning club near you, then you can usually get hands on mentoring for free (or the cost of joining) that is as good or even better instruction offered at a Rockler's or Woodcraft store where you pay big bucks.
Totally agree. I got hands on mentoring plus two monthly meetings every month for the $30 price of joining.
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post #19 of 19 Old 07-08-2015, 04:22 AM Thread Starter
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Originally Posted by Bill Boehme View Post
If there is a woodturning club near you, then you can usually get hands on mentoring for free (or the cost of joining) that is as good or even better instruction offered at a Rockler's or Woodcraft store where you pay big bucks.
Thanks, Bill.

THAT, sounds like a REAL plan.
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