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post #1 of 13 Old 09-21-2011, 01:23 PM Thread Starter
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Lathe Tools

Looking to get into woodturning and would like some suggestions on tools that wont break the bank ( under 150 for a set). Mostly planing to do spindles to start but might go into a few bowls once I can get some experience under my belt.

Going to have a Rikon Mini lathe if that helps with suggestions.

Thanks!

Post this in the hand tools section a couple of days ago with no responses so Im hoping you guys can lead me in the right direction.

If my price range is too low maybe help me decide on one or two high quality tools that I will not need to upgrade later on.
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post #2 of 13 Old 09-21-2011, 01:35 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by EHCRain View Post
Looking to get into woodturning and would like some suggestions on tools that wont break the bank ( under 150 for a set). Mostly planing to do spindles to start but might go into a few bowls once I can get some experience under my belt.

Going to have a Rikon Mini lathe if that helps with suggestions.

Thanks!

Post this in the hand tools section a couple of days ago with no responses so Im hoping you guys can lead me in the right direction.

If my price range is too low maybe help me decide on one or two high quality tools that I will not need to upgrade later on.
Their are lot's of tool's out their . I would only buy them one at a time. This way you only buy what you are going to use. If cutting's beed's their are beed cutter's out their making it easy to do. I have all 3 size's all mine are Richard Sorby which i find work's fine. Don't buy cheep one or that will be a head ack for you never stay sharpen and just junk. Do a google search for turnning tool's. I will send a link on turning their are lot's of sites. I belive if i were you i would read in them. Their will be more info their than here. this link has more readinf for you check it out. http://www.turnedwood.com/links.html

http://www.ehow.com/video_4755535_wo...ing-tools.html

Last edited by del schisler; 09-21-2011 at 02:08 PM. Reason: more info
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post #3 of 13 Old 09-21-2011, 01:53 PM
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Hey Rain, welcome to the world of woodturning. As del said, don't buy your tools in sets. THere will be tools that you don't need/like. To start with spindles, get yourself a spindle roughing gouge, a 1/4" and/or a 3/8" gouge, a diamond parting tool, and maybe a skew (takes practice to master this one mor ethan the others). These tools are great beginner tools, good quality without breaking the bank:
http://www.woodturnerscatalog.com/st...__Artisan?Args=

$155 for the tools mentioned above (add $30 for the 3/8" gouge) plus I think they take 10% off if you buy 2 or more tools at the same time (I don't think they have to be the same tool). Also, great customer service and fast order processing here.

Good luck.

That bowl was perfect right up until that last cut...
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post #4 of 13 Old 09-21-2011, 01:58 PM
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Paying more for wood turning tools is not necessarily better.

Initially I started of with a set of SteelX tools from Grizzly (6 for +-$100) and then I complemented the set with some expensive tools from Ashly Isles, mail ordered in from the UK. All my tools are high speed steel. The Grizzly stuff works just as well and holds their edge just as well.

I turn mostly furniture parts and the three I use the most are:

1.) 1 " Deep U gouge, if sharpened right with the final cut on the side bevel, 220 sandpaper finishes the rest fast.
2.) 3/4" Parting tool.
3.) 1" Skew.

I have 16 turning tools, but the above three do 95% of my work.

Last edited by WillemJM; 09-21-2011 at 02:19 PM.
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post #5 of 13 Old 09-21-2011, 02:30 PM
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Well actually the more expensive tools are better. They hold an edge longer, have better flute and grind shapes and usually are backed by the manufacturer if something is amiss. However it won't make your turnings any better. That's up to you and how you use and sharpen the tools. Benjamin's Best tools are good tools for the price. Off the top of my head I can't remember where to get them but I'll bet you can do a search and find them.
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post #6 of 13 Old 09-21-2011, 03:18 PM
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Benjamin's Best are the brand label of Penn State Industries -- sold through their own web site, and several resellers on (for example) eBay.

I just bought a couple of Benjamin's Best scrapers from PSI, already had one of their bowl gouges. I'm completely satisfied with them, but prefer the Thompson Tools bowl gouge and spindle detail gouge (which are more expensive, of course)

Please visit my website, Fruit of the Lathe
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post #7 of 13 Old 09-21-2011, 03:57 PM
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Someone had tools from Grizzly & PSI tested and not exactly M2 HSS, but close. Think good mix for spindle turning: 3/8” & ” spindle gouges, ” roughing gouge, ” or ” skew chisel, and diamond parting tool. Do not need scrappers for spindle work.

Craft Supplies artisan tools made by HT hard to beat for the price. PSI not bad for ordering individual tools too.

Learning to turn & sharpen on inexpensive tools not a bad way to start off.


You can order Ashley Iles tools from:
http://www.toolsforworkingwood.com/Merchant/merchant.mvc?Screen=CTGY&Store_Code=toolshop&Categ ory_Code=CIL
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post #8 of 13 Old 09-21-2011, 04:39 PM
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Before you buy the best chisels , scrapers and gouges that you can get ,
if you don't already have one ,
buy a good bench grinder and at least one top quality stone , and a diamond wheel dresser.
The best tools in the world can get killed on bad grindstones
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post #9 of 13 Old 09-21-2011, 05:35 PM
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+1 to what Manuka said. Good quality Norton wheels and a sharpening system like the wolverine jig are (almost) essential.

That bowl was perfect right up until that last cut...
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post #10 of 13 Old 09-21-2011, 05:44 PM
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It is nice to buy unhanded tools and get practice with your spindle turning. You can use different woods for each tool and make them both attractive and easier to identify.
Buy quality from a specialty vendor for your main tools. Lee Valley and other such stores should have a sales person that is a turner and can help. Start with tools for the size and type of turning you hope to do and add tools when you "need" them and spread the cost over time.
Taking courses and see what tools are used. There are a lot of interesting specialty tools for hollow work etc.
The previous advice for spindle work seemed good. A one inch skew is not too expensive and very valuable to learn to use if not master for spindle work. There are cuts for which they make the most clean slice. Scraping in spindle work is less desirable.
Good luck.
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post #11 of 13 Old 09-21-2011, 09:45 PM
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I bought my 8" grinder from Woodcraft. It comes with a 60 and 120 grit white diamond 1 1/8 wide wheels. So far they have worked great. You will also need a wolverine sharpening jig. Those are priceless. Next lathe tools, don't buy a whole set. It's a waste of money. Buy what you need and buy good quality tools "one at a time". Robert Sorby is a good brand. Thompson tools are great but you will need to make your own handle for them. I've got mostly Robert Sorby, 3/8 spindle gouge,1/2" bowl gouge,3/16 parting tool and others but I can do most of my work with these few tools. I do have some BB tools and they work good but do not hold an edge as long as the RS. Sometimes you can find the RS on e-bay or craigslist.
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post #12 of 13 Old 09-22-2011, 11:33 AM
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my 2 cents

Quote:
Originally Posted by EHCRain View Post
Looking to get into woodturning and would like some suggestions on tools that wont break the bank ( under 150 for a set). Mostly planing to do spindles to start but might go into a few bowls once I can get some experience under my belt.

Going to have a Rikon Mini lathe if that helps with suggestions.

Thanks!

Post this in the hand tools section a couple of days ago with no responses so Im hoping you guys can lead me in the right direction.

If my price range is too low maybe help me decide on one or two high quality tools that I will not need to upgrade later on.
If I may, good choice is Harbor freight set of chisels less than 50 bucks. Reasons
1. Really good HSS steel
2. Practice sharpening and reshaping cutters.
3 This will be the only set of chisels you should buy.After that individuals best bet.
----------------------------next------------------------------
4. Save your money, buy a good low speed (8 inch) grinder, Try Grizzly while your in there web site look at there chucks and live centers and spur drive.
5. I like Penn state and or Packard, for a look/see web site
6. DON.T FORGET AMAZON web site for comparison shopping, big savings.
I wish someone would of told me (ah well), you be lucky. Have fun be safe.
Ron Marietta Ga.
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post #13 of 13 Old 09-22-2011, 11:41 AM
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You might want to pick up an very inexpensive set just to learn on and to see which tools you will be using most. Here is one set less than $20.
http://www.harborfreight.com/8-piece...-kit-3793.html

A better set than that one will also get you going for now.
http://www.harborfreight.com/8-piece...set-47066.html








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