Kaleidoscopes I made - Page 2 - Woodworking Talk - Woodworkers Forum
Reply
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
post #21 of 61 Old 07-11-2011, 05:37 PM
Senior Member
 
Joe Lyddon's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2007
Location: Alta Loma, CA
Posts: 714
View Joe Lyddon's Photo Album My Photos
Cool

Okiebugg,

Would you like to share with us How you made them?

Sure would be nice...

Plans anywhere?

Thank you...
Joe Lyddon is offline  
Sponsored Links
Advertisement
 
post #22 of 61 Old 07-11-2011, 08:46 PM Thread Starter
Member
 
Join Date: Jul 2011
Location: Auburn Ga.
Posts: 37
View MrWayne52's Photo Album My Photos
Kaleidoscopes first mudule

As an introduction to my teaching how to make Kaleidoscopes I feel a brief history of the Kaleidoscope is in order.

Sir David Brewster invented them in 1816 however his patent failed to withstand a challenge in the courts of his day and as a result Sir Brewster enjoyed little economic benefit from his invention.

In 1986 Cozy Baker founded the Brewster Society which is still in existence today. Those interested in pursuing more history on Kaleidoscopes can go to www.brewstersociety.com and learn huge amounts of helpful and interesting history.

I first learned about making Kaleidoscopes around eight years ago from a gentleman in Atlanta Georgia. Jim spent a full Saturday covering the basic skills needed to make a Kaleidoscope. Jim was a caring and devoted artist and freely shared his talent with anyone interested for free.

Moving on, a Kaleidoscope consists of mainly five major components. There is a barrel, an eye piece, a mirror system, an object cell and an object cell housing. By far the most important component is the mirror assembly. Without a well crafted mirror assembly the Kaleidoscope would be nothing more than a beautiful trinket for the mantle.

Turned wooden Kaleidoscopes are not the only shape they come in. Many people make them from stained glass, there are wet cell and dry cell scopes, metal, and plastic or cardboard. Just about anything you can imagine can be made into a Kaleidoscope as long as you can fit a mirror system into the barrel. Don’t worry all these foreign terms will mean something soon.

I happen to make wooden turned Kaleidoscopes because this is my preferred medium. You however may prefer to make scopes out of other materials. By visiting the Brewster Society you can let your imagination go free.

This is about all the time I have tonight but when I return hopefully tomorrow I will get into the nuts and bolts of the mirror systems and explain why Kaleidoscopes rise and fall on the mirror system.

Hope to be back soon

Wayne email: MrWayne52(at)aol(dot)com
MrWayne52 is offline  
post #23 of 61 Old 07-12-2011, 07:55 AM
Old School
 
cabinetman's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2007
Location: So. Florida
Posts: 24,027
View cabinetman's Photo Album My Photos
Those are really very well done. I remember Kaleidoscopes from when I was a kid, and I think they were made from cardboard. Yours are beautiful. I like the wood look.








.
cabinetman is offline  
Sponsored Links
Advertisement
 
post #24 of 61 Old 07-12-2011, 09:54 PM Thread Starter
Member
 
Join Date: Jul 2011
Location: Auburn Ga.
Posts: 37
View MrWayne52's Photo Album My Photos
Kaleidoscopes second module

Ok let’s talk about Kaleidoscope mirrors. But first, there is not only one way to make them, some are big some small there are short and long mirrors. There are some things though that should not be tinkered with when it comes to having a quality image in the Kaleidoscope. I recommend only using what is called a first surface mirrors. The reflective mirror media is on the top of the glass where on standard mirror glass has it on the back surface facing the top of the glass. This causes a double reflection of the colored objects in the Kaleidoscope object cell. This is because the top of the glass will create a reflection then the back surface reflector will do it again making a somewhat distorted image.

Our next important issue is to decide how many mirrors will be used. To explain the mirror assembly consists of mirror strips that run the length of the barrel they are housed in. Looking at the scopes I make the center barrel is 8 inches long so my mirrors are cut 8 inches long. Kaleidoscope mirrors I make are either 2 or 3 mirror assemblies. The mirrors are made into a very accurate triangle. A 2 mirror system has the base made of a black painted piece of plain glass I paint this piece flat black. The 2 sides are the mirror pieces. I make the triangle either 45 degrees or 30 degrees. ( I will include a picture later when my Digital camera comes back home). For a 3 mirror system all 3 pieces are mirror and again are 45 or 30 degrees.
Let me stress the importance of the accuracy of the triangle mirror assembly. If the angle formed at the apex of the mirrors is not extremely accurate the image when viewed through the Kaleidoscope will not be symmetrical and will have an unpleasing look. I will go into more detail about how to cut mirrors to get this accuracy later. Do not let this section of the discussion discourage you I have resources available to get pre made mirror assemblies if needed.

As should be noted there are many different ways to craft the mirrors. There are more than 3 piece assemblies but I have no experience with them. So rather than give untested information I will defer these to those experts.
This is enough for tonight so I will try to move on to other things tomorrow like wet or dry object cells.

Hopefully people are getting some value from this thread. I am very excited about doing this and look forward to giving away my Kaleidoscope craft.

Wayne
MrWayne52 is offline  
The Following 3 Users Say Thank You to MrWayne52 For This Useful Post:
JohnSo (07-22-2011), TexasTimbers (10-27-2011), tmoll (07-13-2011)
post #25 of 61 Old 07-13-2011, 10:16 PM Thread Starter
Member
 
Join Date: Jul 2011
Location: Auburn Ga.
Posts: 37
View MrWayne52's Photo Album My Photos
Kaleidoscopes third module

There is much more that could be said about Kaleidoscope mirrors but for the sake of time and space all I want to add is the two mirror systems I have discussed 45 degree and 30 degree are about all I use. One other mirror I have made was a 36 degree system. This mirror makes a 5 pointed star and is quite beautiful.

Our next area to consider is the object cell. This is where the colored media is stored. When someone views the Kaleidoscope through the eye piece and rotates the object cell housing the colored media tumbles and creates the cascading ever changing symphony of beauty. The speed of the media tumbling is controlled by what is in the cell along with the colored beads. There are dry cells meaning only the beads are in the cell. With this type object cell the beads tumble quickly and are even a bit noisy. Dry cells are easier to make than wet cells because there is nothing to leak out and spoil the housing. Wet cells have some type liquid inside, when rotated the beads quietly and gracefully tumble at a slower speed. I personally use medium weight clear mineral oil. Some Kaleidoscope makers use glycerin, either will work, and since a friend gave me a 5 gallon bucket of mineral oil I stick with it . All colored beads I use are available at craft stores in most fair sized cities.

I usually put 2 or 3 of each color I decide to use into the object cell. I lean strongly towards red, blue, green, and a pink one or two. Be careful to avoid using to many beads, if you do then the beads will not have enough room to tumble and this will diminish the cascading effect. All the beads must be of the type that light can go through them, otherwise the beads will just be a black shape without any color showing. There are some scopes that solid beads will work but that is a type I have no experience with.

To recap I have covered briefly the mirrors, and now the object cells. However there is much more I could have mentioned but this will do for now. I don’t want this to overwhelm anyone so I will stop here.

Tomorrow I will discuss making the wood parts and what I do. In reality I will only scratch the surface so you will be free to use your own turning skills and imagination.

MrWayne
MrWayne52 is offline  
post #26 of 61 Old 07-13-2011, 10:26 PM
Scotty D
 
mdntrdr's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2009
Location: IL.
Posts: 4,479
View mdntrdr's Photo Album My Photos
Awesome right up!

This is very interesting, please continue posting.

Scott
OH, wait a minute ............Yep!.............That's what he said!

"Like" us on facebook
www.ScottyDsWoodworks.com
Watch Our YouTube Video
mdntrdr is offline  
post #27 of 61 Old 07-13-2011, 10:31 PM
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Jan 2011
Location: Detroit Michigan
Posts: 782
View Woodworkingkid's Photo Album My Photos
They look great and I would also would love to learn how to make one so thanks for explaining indeapth about them

Sent from my iPod touch using Wood Forum

Lighten up . It's just the internet.
Woodworkingkid is offline  
post #28 of 61 Old 07-13-2011, 10:40 PM Thread Starter
Member
 
Join Date: Jul 2011
Location: Auburn Ga.
Posts: 37
View MrWayne52's Photo Album My Photos
I plan to continue

Thanks everyone for the kind words you have said here. I am really enjoying doing this and intend to continue. I plan to eventually put all the instructions into a downloadable ebook that will not be chopped up into bits and pieces. I envision a complete video series and if all works out I hope to publish a Kindle version for those with the Kindle, Nook and the soon to be released Google ebook reader.

Again Thanks

MrWayne
MrWayne52 is offline  
post #29 of 61 Old 07-13-2011, 10:54 PM
Trytore Member
 
Shop Dad's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2011
Location: Central New Jersey
Posts: 2,764
View Shop Dad's Photo Album My Photos
Thanks for taking time to share with us. You have some rapt listeners here!
Shop Dad is offline  
post #30 of 61 Old 07-13-2011, 11:07 PM
Old used up Marine
 
okiebugg's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2010
Location: Sapulpa Oklahoma-Tulsa suburb
Posts: 41
View okiebugg's Photo Album My Photos
Quote:
Originally Posted by Joe Lyddon View Post
Okiebugg,

Would you like to share with us How you made them?

Sure would be nice...

Plans anywhere?

Thank you...
As one old retired fart to another, I hope that you feel up to doin a little digging. A kaleidioscope with a few similarities was shown as a project in 1985 thru 1990-My memory is...what was I talking about??? Oh, fine woodworking Magazine.
I'll go back in my files and see if I have some project scopes in all of my junk. I don't know what your skill level is, but between the two of us, we surely could come up with something...If you have questions, Email me and we will get together over the phone...Jim

"As the Wood Turns"
Fine woodworking
Fine woodturning
Sapulpa, OK
okiebugg is offline  
post #31 of 61 Old 07-13-2011, 11:27 PM
Senior Member
 
Joe Lyddon's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2007
Location: Alta Loma, CA
Posts: 714
View Joe Lyddon's Photo Album My Photos
Cool

okiebugg,

I thought you would be talking to all of us... NOT just me...
Just start out with something Elementary... and easy to understand.
Then we can grow from there...
Joe Lyddon is offline  
post #32 of 61 Old 07-14-2011, 11:44 AM Thread Starter
Member
 
Join Date: Jul 2011
Location: Auburn Ga.
Posts: 37
View MrWayne52's Photo Album My Photos
Would an ebook be helpful?

After posting Kaleidoscope making techniques in this thread, I started, and thinking about a complete ebook with all the information I posted compiled into one document might be helpful.I feel like the information chopped up like this would make it cumbersum to follow if people try to build one. So I thought a complete ebook that could be downloaded and then printed out might be a valuable addition. Of course that would have to be done after all the posts I plan to do were posted here first.

Let me know your thoughts.

MrWayne
MrWayne52 is offline  
post #33 of 61 Old 07-14-2011, 12:18 PM
Senior Member
 
Joe Lyddon's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2007
Location: Alta Loma, CA
Posts: 714
View Joe Lyddon's Photo Album My Photos
Cool

MrWayne,

Sounds like an eBook would be better & easier for you/us in the long run.

You be the judge... I can take either way...

I do think the eBook would be better... all in one place, like you said.

Are you going to have pictures too?

Thank you...
Joe Lyddon is offline  
post #34 of 61 Old 07-14-2011, 02:33 PM Thread Starter
Member
 
Join Date: Jul 2011
Location: Auburn Ga.
Posts: 37
View MrWayne52's Photo Album My Photos
ebook.with pictures

I would think an ebook would be useless unless there were pictures. I think the best value to people would be to have a ebook rich with pictoral. One picture would save a lot of typing

MrWayne
MrWayne52 is offline  
post #35 of 61 Old 07-14-2011, 08:41 PM
Senior Member
 
Joe Lyddon's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2007
Location: Alta Loma, CA
Posts: 714
View Joe Lyddon's Photo Album My Photos
Cool

... I agree...
Joe Lyddon is offline  
post #36 of 61 Old 07-14-2011, 09:54 PM
Trytore Member
 
Shop Dad's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2011
Location: Central New Jersey
Posts: 2,764
View Shop Dad's Photo Album My Photos
Think of this as your first draft!
Shop Dad is offline  
post #37 of 61 Old 07-14-2011, 10:35 PM Thread Starter
Member
 
Join Date: Jul 2011
Location: Auburn Ga.
Posts: 37
View MrWayne52's Photo Album My Photos
Kaleidoscopes module 4

I have made several dozen Kaleidoscopes from various wood species. There are black walnut, cedar, zebra, canary, cherry, and cocobolo, woods that I have used so be creative and just select something you think you would like to use.

For the type scopes I make there are three basic components in the scope the barrel, object cell housing and the eye piece. When I purchase wood it usually is in the ¾ inch thickness range. My finished barrel is 1¾ inch diameter and the two end pieces are 2 3/8 inch diameter. When I start out I rip a strip of material 2 inches wide and then I cut the strip into 3 pieces 8 ¼ long. I make sure the shorter strips are as flat and straight as I can make them. This makes for a very small glue joint when I glue the three pieces together on their faces. I also don’t have to clamp them together with extreme force to get a tight joint. You now have a 2 inch wide by 2 ¼ thick block. Before I proceed with anything else I trim both ends to make the block exactly 8 inches long. Next I take a straight edge and draw a line diagonally from the corners on the ends. This will give a center point for positioning the live center in the tailstock and a point to place the drive center in the chuck for turning between centers.

This same procedure works for the end pieces except I rip one strip of the wood 2 ¾ wide and long enough to get 4 pieces 6 1/4 inches long. This way when I turn the two end pieces I turn both at the same time. Easier doing these both. Again glue the 4 pieces together to form a block 2 3/4 wide 3 tall and 6 1/4 long. This piece looks a little wasteful but it works best for me to just turn away the excess and not worry about it. Trim the ends and arrive at approximately a 6 inch long block. Mark the ends and set aside. We will get back to it.

We now have to make the barrel round. I place the barrel piece between centers and rough turn it to something like 2 inches in diameter. I choose this size because my lathe chuck will only open that big. Got to get a bigger chuck.

Since I use 8 inch long mirror assemblies for my Kaleidoscopes I have to get a hole all the way through the length of the barrel. With the assembly going through the barrel this hole must be drilled as straight as possible. The mirror will not tolerate any bending. I do not even attempt the drill all the way from one end but drill half way through from each end. This averages out the mismatch. I drill it with a 1 ¼ drill. The mirror assemblies will fit nicely.

Tomorrow I will delve deeper into finishing this piece and then get on to the rest of the wood pieces. I promise when I get my digital camera back there will be pictures uploaded.
Wayne

Last edited by MrWayne52; 07-14-2011 at 10:37 PM.
MrWayne52 is offline  
post #38 of 61 Old 07-15-2011, 09:41 PM Thread Starter
Member
 
Join Date: Jul 2011
Location: Auburn Ga.
Posts: 37
View MrWayne52's Photo Album My Photos
Kaleidoscopes module 5

Lets talk some more about drilling the hole through the barrel. As I said I do not drill this hole from one end but rather from both ends. To digress a bit I failed to state that after turning the barrel to 2 inches I chuck it into the lathe chuck. This necessitates getting it running true in the chuck. Now I drill half way through. Turn around and Re chuck the piece and drill until I meet the hole from the other end. There will be some mismatch but it will be provided it isn’t to much. With the barrel being 2 inches in diameter chuck jaw marks are not a worry we have one last finishing turn to do and any marks will go away.

To start the final turning operations I make a dummy plug to fit the hole in the barrel with slight resistance to going in. This will support the end of the barrel, when the tailstock live center point is forced into the end.

To finish turn I make a friction mandrel by chucking a scrap piece of wood about 3 ½ inches long and 2 1/2 inches in diameter into the chuck. I turn this piece of wood back about 2 inches to fit the hole in the barrel this must be a snug friction fit so I usually make small cuts until I get very close then out comes the 80 grit to 100 grit sandpaper and I sand it down until the barrel will slide over it to the shoulder. This fit needs to be fairly tight but not so much that you can’t get it back off later when finished.
Now I slide the barrel onto this mandrel and insert the plug into the tailstock end and tighten the tailstock live center into the plug until it forces the barrel against the shoulder on the mandrel. The final sizing and finishing can now be done. Here is when close attention to precision comes into play. The outside of the barrel must be turned the full length to slightly under 1 ¾ inches in diameter. That is if you plan to spray it with clear lacquer or some other clear finish. My scopes after sanding thru 400 grit paper are coated with 6 or 7 coats of clear lacquer.

My scopes have a rotating object cell housing on them so the person viewing the image can rotate the housing without having to rotate the whole scope to make the image do it’s magic. This has always held a sense of wonderment for people as to how I do this without the housing pulling off. Well here is the secret. I use a coated wire locking mechanism to retain the housing. The wire I use is 1/8 diameter and what I do is I cut a groove a little more than the wire is wide and deep enough that it is completely below the out side diameter of the barrel. I cut a piece of wire long enough to wrap all the way around the barrel but short enough that it doesn’t have both ends meet. This groove needs to be deep enough so the cell housing with a 1 ¾ hole will pass over the wire in the groove when side onto the barrel. This will make since when I upload the assembly procedure pictures. I position this groove a half inch from one eng of the barrel. To do this I scribe a line onto the barrel ½ inch from the end I chose and center the groove at this line and widen both sides until it is 3/16 wide to the proper depth.

I know all this is probably confusing and overwhelming at this point but please bare with me and all the pictures I upload will clear it up. My wife will be home Sunday and I will start putting pictures up as soon as I can.

This has been longwinded so I will stop here. Over the weekend I will post more about turning the end pieces and then you will know all I know about Kaleidoscopes by next weekend.

I know you have questions and to help anyone with that I set up a email account for questions and comments. Please feel free to email me and I will try to answer them here so other people can benefit. Suggestions are welcome and your email will not be used to spam you.

MY email [email protected]

Wayne
MrWayne52 is offline  
post #39 of 61 Old 07-18-2011, 10:54 PM Thread Starter
Member
 
Join Date: Jul 2011
Location: Auburn Ga.
Posts: 37
View MrWayne52's Photo Album My Photos
Kaleidoscopes module 6

I want to go over how I make the two end pieces. At this point they are both just one large rectangle glued up block. What I do here is hold between centers again and rough turn the whole block into a cylinder approximately 2 ¾ in diameter. As I said earlier my lathe chuck will only open enough to chuck on a 2 inch piece of wood so I turn a tenon on the tailstock end 2 inches diameter and a ½ inch long. Next I turn the cylinder around and chuck on the tenon I turned earlier.

Here I drill 3 holes in this end I drill with fostner style drills so I get flat bottomed holes. I start with a 1 ¾ diameter drill and I drill 1 ¾ deep these drilled depths need to be held fairly close but don’t get to fanatical with it plus or minus 1/16 inch will be fine. Next I use a 1 ½ diameter drill and drill ¾ inch deep from the bottom of the 1 ¾ diameter hole. This hole will create a shoulder for the object cell to install to. Now I use a 1 ¼ Diameter drill and drill 5/8 to ¾ deep from the bottom of the 1 ½ hole. After drilling the holes I next cut a radius shaped groove into the 1 ¾ diameter hole, this groove will allow the wire I discussed earlier to spring into when the wire is installed into the groove in the barrel and this housing is slid over the barrel creating the locking mechanism to keep it from falling off. Locate the groove 1 inch from the end and cut it just deep enough to have a well formed radius. Just keep in mind that you will cut the end off when finishing the final shape if it is cut to deep. You can now finish the final shape. Be very gentle here as this part can fly out of the chuck and make a mess of your face. Gentle cuts and no catches. You can now do most of the sanding and prep work for the final finishing. When ready part the housing off to about 3 inches long making sure it doesn’t bounce all through your shop.


We need a new friction mandrel that we will use to finish these pieces. Make it to fit snugly enough into the hole so we can do the outside turning without them flying off. By making it about 2 inches long I can use it for both pieces.

Now I am going to mostly finish the eye piece. I make sure that I have the final shape in mind and I turn it to that shape. The only rule to keep in mind on this final shape is to make it pleasing to your eye. You can look at my finished scopes for an idea to start with but use your imagination for yours. This part is much easier, we drill a 1 ¾ diameter hole 1 5/8 deep. I use the 1 ½ diameter drill and drill a very shallow hole from the bottom of the 1 ¾ hole 1/8 deep. This is a cavity to install a clear glass lens to keep out dust and debris. Last I drill a hole 3/8 diameter through the rest of the piece. Rough the final shape and get it mostly ready for the final finishing steps part it off 2 inches long.

Now chuck the friction mandrel back in the chuck and blend the ends to suit the shape you want them to be and do all your finish sanding.

We are pretty much done with all the wood pieces and can now apply the coating of your choice. I spray my finish sanded scopes with clear lacquer about 6 or 7 times until they look like I want.

Next time we will discuss cutting mirrors, making the object cell, and installing it in the housing and installing the glass lens in the eye piece.

Wayne email: [email protected]

Last edited by MrWayne52; 07-18-2011 at 10:57 PM.
MrWayne52 is offline  
post #40 of 61 Old 07-21-2011, 09:56 PM
Junior Member
 
WoodBen's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2011
Location: Tulare, California
Posts: 21
View WoodBen's Photo Album My Photos
Thumbs up Exciting ideas!!

OK!! I can see right now there are going to be a whole BUNCH of new ideas I am going to get excited about on this forum!! Thanks for the post and pics. I'm going to have to look into this one for sure. I know my grandkids would LOVE a kaleidoscope from Papa!!
WoodBen is offline  
Reply

Quick Reply
Message:
Options

Register Now



In order to be able to post messages on the Woodworking Talk - Woodworkers Forum forums, you must first register.
Please enter your desired user name, your email address and other required details in the form below.

User Name:
Password
Please enter a password for your user account. Note that passwords are case-sensitive.

Password:


Confirm Password:
Email Address
Please enter a valid email address for yourself.

Email Address:
OR

Log-in










Thread Tools
Show Printable Version Show Printable Version
Email this Page Email this Page
Display Modes
Linear Mode Linear Mode



Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
I think I made it too big... Masterofnone General Woodworking Discussion 9 06-09-2011 03:51 PM
Made in the USA Scribbler General Woodworking Discussion 29 12-26-2010 09:23 AM
I made my own.. Gene Howe General Woodworking Discussion 17 03-15-2009 11:17 AM
Made another box Geoguy Project Showcase 8 01-06-2009 02:48 PM
Made my first ZCI TS3660 General Woodworking Discussion 6 03-13-2008 10:05 AM

Posting Rules  
You may post new threads
You may post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off

 
For the best viewing experience please update your browser to Google Chrome