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post #1 of 12 Old 11-11-2011, 05:03 PM Thread Starter
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Jamb Chuck

To finish my shaving mug, I need a jamb chuck. So I am told.

The article I am working from says that the author made his. Would someone mind helping me out again? I really messed up the Becote blank that I was working on this morning, However, it does happen to be a 2 1/2" cylinder. Can I chuck it in my Talon chuck and put a rag over it to take up space and go for it or do I need something else?

Thank you in advance.

Andy

Thank You

Andy
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post #2 of 12 Old 11-11-2011, 05:59 PM
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Andy,
You'll probably mar the end up if you do that. A jamb chuck is very simply a piece of scrap wood turned to fit inside your mug snugly. You don't want it so tight you have to beat the mug on, but it should hold firmly without any wiggle. You can put a piece of painters tape around the joint to make sure it doesn't come off unexpectantly. Then take light cuts and go ahead and finish the bottom. The jamb chuck doesn't necessarily have to take up the whole space inside the mug. It just needs to go in far enough to hold it in place. 1/2- 1" should be fine.
Mike Hawkins
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post #3 of 12 Old 11-11-2011, 10:28 PM
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First as to terminology. The way I learned for a jamb chuck was like Mike explained. You turn a recess or tenon to match the diameter of your item. The part “jammed” is usually about ˝”. If you make it a little too small you can use paper towels to enhance the fit. This method allows you to turn the bottom with no support from the tailstock. It is tricky in that you must have a proper fit and use light cuts. In videos by Richard Raffan, Ray Keys, and Dennis White they all had to use paper towel to adjust the fit at one time or another so don’t feel bad if it is not perfect the first time, you really have to sneak up on the fit.

There is also a friction chuck and this sounds like what you are describing. Some people do call this a jamb chuck.
Any scrap of wood is held in the jaws and does not match your item in diameter (it is turned round and true). The end is flat or slightly concave so that only the outer edge contacts the inside of your item. You place whatever you want over the end, paper towel, scrap of leather, foam…. Anything to keep the inside from getting marred. You will need tailstock support for this, using only enough pressure for the necessary friction. Turn the bottom leaving only a small nub where the tailstock meets. Remove from the lathe and chisel off and sand away the small nub.

You can use either method. With the jamb chuck you have to be very accurate with the fit since this is the only thing holding the item on the lathe. With the friction chuck you have lots of leeway but you should anticipate your need to center the item and leave the original nub (or some mark from the tailstock) at the bottom from the start of your project. If you have the original point it is quick to line up the center again.
For a bowl I leave about a 3/8” wide nub when roughing out and it stays there until the very end of the final turning.

They who can give up essential liberty to obtain a little temporary safety, deserve neither liberty nor safety. Benjamin Franklin
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post #4 of 12 Old 11-12-2011, 09:35 AM
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I may end up using wet paper towel on jam chuck to get secure hold.
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post #5 of 12 Old 11-12-2011, 07:58 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by wildwood View Post
I may end up using wet paper towel on jam chuck to get secure hold.
WW,
the paper towel should be dry. It is meant just to work like a shim. If you wet it, you'll end up with raised grain where it touches.
Mike Hawkins
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post #6 of 12 Old 11-13-2011, 07:54 AM
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Mike right, using wet paper towels on a jam chuck raises the grain on both chuck and piece you want to hold if not already finished. Because you raise the grain when you wet wood just wetting wood will work too!

Benefits snug hold no wobble or wood slipping as you turn. Simply wet piece of paper towel wring it out, wrap completely around jam chuck, slide component over top make sure piece on center and start turning.

Cons have to wait until wood dry to sand and finish. Only use enough wet paper towel to get good fit. Too much wet/dry paper towel and force can split your wood. Try wetting wood if in doubt.

Learn this procedure from Richard Raffan “Turning Wood,” book and video and tips, tricks, and techniques past down by other turners. No wet paper towels do not work or practical on every type of jam chuck.
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post #7 of 12 Old 11-13-2011, 09:10 AM
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Look on you tube and watch "Turning small wooden boxes" You will see him making and using a jam chuck. Simple to make and easy to use. I have a cabinet full of them made out of scrap.
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post #8 of 12 Old 11-13-2011, 09:42 AM Thread Starter
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I made it!!! The shaving mug, razor, brush and stand are off to the show. I was also tasked to "test" out the shaving soap that she made. As a result, I turned a shaving brush for me out of Weng. I tested the soap this AM, it is fine.

I will post pix of the mug set when she gets back.

I used the ruined bacote as a jamb chuck. I used a garage rag to take up the space. I got a wobbly fit. I was able to finish the bottom of the mug. Considering it is my first try, I am happy with what I did. I am absolutely ecstatic with what I have learned. I could not have done it without the help that I got here. Thank you all.

This turning kind of gets under your skin. It is a very good outlet for creative energy.

Thank You

Andy
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post #9 of 12 Old 11-13-2011, 07:28 PM Thread Starter
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Pictures as promised. First the cocobolo mug and shaving set.




Bacote shaving set the mug will be along later. LOL

Thank You

Andy
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post #10 of 12 Old 11-13-2011, 07:42 PM
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I like both but I really like that cocobolo. Fancy and classy!
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post #11 of 12 Old 11-13-2011, 09:38 PM
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Nicely done. I particularly like the multiple indentations in the soap mug. I often think some of them are made by people who've never shaved -- they have perfectly smooth profiles that are impossible to grip with wet and/or soapy hands

Please visit my website, Fruit of the Lathe
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post #12 of 12 Old 11-14-2011, 09:38 PM
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Nice work Andy,
nothing like some polished up cocobolo.
Mike Hawkins
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