How did you learn to turn? - Woodworking Talk - Woodworkers Forum
 3Likes
  • 1 Post By Pineknot_86
  • 2 Post By holtzdreher
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
post #1 of 13 Old 07-30-2019, 08:09 AM Thread Starter
Senior Member
 
hawkeye10's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2015
Location: Murfreesboro, Tn.
Posts: 1,111
View hawkeye10's Photo Album My Photos
How did you learn to turn?

I have started off using carbide tools and I have been doing pretty good for a self-taught turner. I am now wanting to learn how to use conventional tools and I am finding it a lot harder to learn. I have been thinking about taking lessons if I can find someone to teach me. So the question is did you guys take lessons or are you self taught?

Don in Murfreesboro, TN.
hawkeye10 is offline  
Sponsored Links
Advertisement
 
post #2 of 13 Old 07-30-2019, 08:46 AM
Senior Member
 
Pineknot_86's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2016
Posts: 1,871
View Pineknot_86's Photo Album My Photos
I bought a used lathe several years ago and it went kapooey. Got a new Rikon. Have a set of Harbor Freight tools but some are never used. My first turning was a piece of 2x4 and a dull wood chisel! Two things I did- join AAW and a local club; www.woodturner.org is the site. You can search for a local club. Both are well worth the investment to learn. Welcome to the forum!!!!
Kerrys likes this.

A diamond is how coal reacts under pressure.
Pineknot_86 is offline  
post #3 of 13 Old 07-30-2019, 11:11 AM
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Aug 2017
Posts: 2,088
View Tool Agnostic's Photo Album My Photos
Multimodal, and still learning. I learn from books and magazines. I belong to a club. I ask a lot of questions. Fortunately, my friends have been understanding. Sometimes I learn from the internet. I prefer text with photos, but will watch an occasional YouTube video. Most important, I keep practicing on scrapwood and real hardwoods. I use both HSS and carbide tools.

The woodturning skill I needed the most was learning to sharpen the HSS tools well. I use a Grizzly wet grinder with Tormek jigs. The woodturning skill I needed second most was learning to relax.

I like to learn from books, but not everyone does. Here is the best basic woodturning book I have found so far. It is somewhat dry, but thorough. The included DVD is also dry:

https://www.amazon.com/Woodturning-F.../dp/1784940631
Tool Agnostic is online now  
Sponsored Links
Advertisement
 
post #4 of 13 Old 07-30-2019, 11:23 AM
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Jul 2016
Posts: 650
View holtzdreher's Photo Album My Photos
Back in the mid 1960's my father had me help him make a walnut gavel for my 6th teacher. He helped me with several projects and then he helped me make a bowl. By the time I was in college, I was making bowls and selling them for some extra cash. Moved away when I started working and never got back into it until 4 years ago. Mrs. and I were at a Christmas craft fair and saw a guy making Christmas trees on a lathe. He wasn't very good, but he was fast. Got me in the mood to try it again. I did hang on to the Craftsman lathe knives (I bought when I was in high school) through all those years away.
holtzdreher is offline  
post #5 of 13 Old 07-30-2019, 01:12 PM
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Sep 2011
Posts: 25,991
View Steve Neul's Photo Album My Photos
I was self taught (sort of). Learned in wood shop in high school. Teacher handed me the wood and a drawing of turnings to make and then went to his office.
Steve Neul is offline  
post #6 of 13 Old 07-30-2019, 03:30 PM
Generic Weeb
 
WeebyWoodWorker's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2017
Location: Gorgeous Oregon!
Posts: 911
View WeebyWoodWorker's Photo Album My Photos
Everybody was scared of the lathe we had when I was at school. Had it shoved away in a corner for years and years before I decided I wanted to to try it. Brought it out cleaned it up and went for it. I'm entirely self taught for better and for worse. Second bowl I tuned took a large piece of my left hand off, had to learn via "Trial By Fire" per say. Apparently I had an impact though as now they have a whole section of the shop set up to turning and got all kinds of fancy lathes and tools. Which is awesome. I got the old one too so now It runs in my shop. Going to have to fix it up a bit though...
-T

God I love Trigger. Inferno Cop is exactly the sort of idiocy they do, It's what makes them so cool. Met them all, great guys.
WeebyWoodWorker is offline  
post #7 of 13 Old 08-03-2019, 10:21 AM
Senior Member
 
firehawkmph's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2008
Location: Near Cleveland, Ohio
Posts: 5,000
View firehawkmph's Photo Album My Photos
Search out a local turning club in your area. You'll learn a lot faster without picking up bad habits along the way. Plus you'll meet a lot of nice people who are happy to help. You'll also learn how to sharpen traditional turning tools, different types of cuts, how to mount odd shaped pieces, etc.
Mike Hawkins
firehawkmph is offline  
post #8 of 13 Old 10-31-2019, 10:25 PM
Member
 
Join Date: Dec 2017
Posts: 37
View jspriddy's Photo Album My Photos
Quote:
Originally Posted by firehawkmph View Post
Search out a local turning club in your area. You'll learn a lot faster without picking up bad habits along the way. Plus you'll meet a lot of nice people who are happy to help. You'll also learn how to sharpen traditional turning tools, different types of cuts, how to mount odd shaped pieces, etc.
Mike Hawkins
This would be the ideal way to learn, but unfortunately, many of us live hours away from a club. I learned a lot from Youtube, and a lot from trial and error. Sharpening accounts for at least half if you're using conventional tools, which is all I have.

John
jspriddy is offline  
post #9 of 13 Old 11-01-2019, 10:47 AM
Senior Member
 
Pineknot_86's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2016
Posts: 1,871
View Pineknot_86's Photo Album My Photos
Woodcraft stores offer classes from basic to advanced.

A diamond is how coal reacts under pressure.
Pineknot_86 is offline  
post #10 of 13 Old 11-01-2019, 06:34 PM
Senior Member
 
Catpower's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2016
Location: Frognot Texas
Posts: 2,222
View Catpower's Photo Album My Photos
A lathe was the first woodworking machine I owned, and it was about 40 years before the internet so it was trial and error, never got hurt or killed so guess it worked out right


There is a lot of info on the net, I think what you are having a problem with is you are used to scraping and with conventional tools, at least gouges shearing creates a much cleaner cut, honestly I learned shearing on the net just watching people do it, I scraped for years, there is a lot lest sanding with shearing

There is no app for experience
Catpower is offline  
post #11 of 13 Old 11-01-2019, 07:15 PM
Senior Member
 
faith michel's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2017
Location: izmir-TÜRKİYE
Posts: 478
View faith michel's Photo Album My Photos
It is so dangerous machine.. my friend did a big accident with lathe.. He had to stay in the hospital. You have to use a motorcycle helmet. Don't self learning. You have to learn a woodworking teacher or a master.

SM-J700F cihazımdan Tapatalk kullanılarak gönderildi

SECOND CHANCE & SECOND LİFE
faith michel is offline  
post #12 of 13 Old 11-03-2019, 07:38 PM
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Jul 2016
Posts: 650
View holtzdreher's Photo Album My Photos
It is a dangerous machine. So is a wash machine or a microwave if you mis use it. Imagine how dangerous it would be to stick your fingers into bike spokes as the wheel spins at a high rpm. One simple rule. Don't stick your fingers in the bike spokes. Most people know not to stick their hand into a clogged law mower chute while the machine is running. Same rules apply with a lathe. Don't stick your body parts into the moving works. Don't wear clothes that might catch in the moving parts. Stuff goes flying, shavings, pieces of tools, a piece of wood spinning at a high rate can disintegrate from centrifugal force. Wear protection.
Catpower and Tool Agnostic like this.
holtzdreher is offline  
post #13 of 13 Old 11-18-2019, 12:07 AM
Ed
 
MountainGuardian's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2019
Location: North Idaho
Posts: 34
View MountainGuardian's Photo Album My Photos
I have been turning for about two years though the only things I have turned have been handles to my tools, shovels, axes etc so far. I am just now getting into trying to turn other stuff.

As for my tools I just have some old pieces of metal that I welded into the ends of pipes and sharpened into various shapes etc. One of my favorite tools is actually an old L shaped tire iron that I touched up on the grinder to have nice sharp sides and edges.

Just today I was out picking up a trailer load of willow and poplar logs from my wife's uncle to mill up and he went into the shop and pulled out a wooden case of lathe tools and gave it to me. They aren't anything special and have never actually been used yet but they should be handy. Short handles but I could extend the handles out a bit bigger.
MountainGuardian is offline  
Reply

Quick Reply
Message:
Options

Register Now



In order to be able to post messages on the Woodworking Talk - Woodworkers Forum forums, you must first register.
Please enter your desired user name, your email address and other required details in the form below.

User Name:
Password
Please enter a password for your user account. Note that passwords are case-sensitive.

Password:


Confirm Password:
Email Address
Please enter a valid email address for yourself.

Email Address:
OR

Log-in










Thread Tools
Show Printable Version Show Printable Version
Email this Page Email this Page
Display Modes
Linear Mode Linear Mode



Posting Rules  
You may post new threads
You may post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off

 
For the best viewing experience please update your browser to Google Chrome