Homemade carbide tools. - Page 2 - Woodworking Talk - Woodworkers Forum
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post #21 of 29 Old 09-20-2015, 12:38 PM
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I have tried several aftermarket carbide cutters and my experience is none have been as sharp as the easy cutters. Yeah they will cut wood but I think they were all meant for steel cutting. The easy ones, so far, have done a better job turning wood.
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post #22 of 29 Old 09-20-2015, 05:09 PM Thread Starter
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My Grandpa has a bunch of carbide cutters made for steel. The Byrd cutters were made to go in a planer, and definitely made to cut wood. They feel as sharp and cut wood as good as the EWT cutters. The AZcarbide cutters feel as sharp as the EWT cutters, but I bought them for making tools so I haven't used them.
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post #23 of 29 Old 09-20-2015, 11:27 PM
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I'm new to turning. I bought the supposedly "better" set of turning chisels from hf just to get started, & to kind of figure things out. They're ok, but I wouldn't give'em as a wedding gift. A friend of mine suggested carbide tools to me, but have no idea about resources. So, what's the round cutters for? And the square cutters? I'm guessing similar to gouges? I've been commissioned by family members to create flower vases for loved ones headstones. Not having a hollowing tool yet, I'm wondering if your round cutters would do what I need to do? What's your opinion? Yes, it sounds like a dumb question, I'm sure, but, I'm learning, & on a tight budget. I'm just kicking around ideas that will work, & will be safe to carry out. Thank you for your time.

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post #24 of 29 Old 09-20-2015, 11:37 PM Thread Starter
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I use the square cutter to make a bowl blank round after that I prefer a bowl gouge. A round one works good for hollowing the inside of a bowl. The round one works especially well for something like a vase where the inside is bigger than the opening. A curved neck works well for doing the top side around the opening of a hollow form.
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post #25 of 29 Old 09-20-2015, 11:55 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by sawdust703 View Post
I'm new to turning. I bought the supposedly "better" set of turning chisels from hf just to get started, & to kind of figure things out. They're ok, but I wouldn't give'em as a wedding gift. A friend of mine suggested carbide tools to me, but have no idea about resources. So, what's the round cutters for? And the square cutters? I'm guessing similar to gouges? I've been commissioned by family members to create flower vases for loved ones headstones. Not having a hollowing tool yet, I'm wondering if your round cutters would do what I need to do? What's your opinion? Yes, it sounds like a dumb question, I'm sure, but, I'm learning, & on a tight budget. I'm just kicking around ideas that will work, & will be safe to carry out. Thank you for your time.
The square cutters are used on convex surfaces and the round ones are used on concave surfaces.

The Easy Wood Tools are way overpriced for what you get. They are very well made and they give great customer support, but for what their tools cost, they ought to make house calls.

Good idea about not giving HF tools as wedding presents. It's best to go with major brand names. Besides, HF doesn't do bridal registries.

The most important thing is to get some instruction on tool usage, sharpening, and turning techniques. There is a huge amount of stuff to learn to be able to turn a vase. Without some mentoring, you will be floundering for quite a while and might wind up tossing in the towel. You can learn by watching videos and reading books, but it is a much slower path.

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post #26 of 29 Old 09-21-2015, 04:56 AM
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Floundering, Mr. Boehme? Throw in the towel? Not a chance, Sir. I'm a self taught woodworker from the beginning, & proud to say so. I appreciate your response, & advice, but, I've read, and read some more, About tool usage & sharpening, tool handling, etc., and finally decided to give it a go about 6 months ago. To this point, I've had a fair amount of success with my creations, & have even managed to sell some of them. Not to bad for a fat old retired truck driver, I'd say, wouldn't you?�� As far as watching the videos, when I started learning woodworking 14 years ago, I was still trucking. Out Anywhere from 3 - 6 weeks out at a time. I'd go to the library when I was home, check me out two or three books at a time, and read them.���� Didn't know anything about watching videos. I managed to finally get through enough books, I decided I was ready to start acquiring wood tools. I learned from what I'd read, trial & error, doing more & more projects. And making numerous mistakes, but I never quit. I decided I was going to learn to do something with old age besides die. I've just kept reading, learning, asking dumb questions, acquiring tools, and most importantly, kept woodworking.���� I'm no stranger to woodworking, Sir, & have no intentions of giving it up. I don't mean to be a pessimist, but, I have full intentions of learning all I can to my satisfaction. Again, my sincere appreciation for answering my questions, & advice. Enjoy the day.

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post #27 of 29 Old 09-21-2015, 12:00 PM Thread Starter
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I strongly agree with Bill that you should get some mentoring. Also a wood vase won't last very long exposed to the elements.
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post #28 of 29 Old 09-21-2015, 05:38 PM
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Didn't mean to raise your hackles, sir. From what you posted, I assumed that you hadn't touched a lathe up to this point and therefore all this was totally new. FWW, I am a self-taught woodworker and also very competent with around 40+ years of experience of serious woodworking and maybe twenty years of piddling around with wood before that. If you have done any serious woodturning then you know that the ONLY thing that woodturning and woodworking have in common is that they both use wood. Beyond that, woodturning is night and day different from woodworking. Using woodturning tools skillfully and creating things on the lathe is another world and it is also so satisfying that it is addictive. And, at the same time, it is also frustrating beyond words when trying to learn on your own (that is how I started out and I did invent some new words that you won't find in the dictionary). I've been turning now for over twelve years and still learning.

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post #29 of 29 Old 11-25-2015, 10:04 PM
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Great cutters!

I recently purchased a set of cutters from hweb99. Although I am a relative newbe to turning and have not use carbide much before, I'd say these are great tools. After getting the feel for them, I used them to turn a set of five handles from oak and a small bowl from hard maple. There was no problem with either wood and I have not had to sharpen them. As far as I can see, there is no change in the edge on the cutters.

Plus, the cutters are mounted on sturdy hardware. The set should last a long time.
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